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Book
xiv, 380 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Abbreviations-- Introduction-- Part I. Background: 1. Syntax-- 2. Semantics-- Part II. Kinds of Arguments: 3. Arguments in syntax-- 4. Arguments in semantics-- 5. Implicit arguments-- Part III. Analysis of Argument Relations: 6. Thematic relations-- 7. Agent and patient-- 8. Role iteration-- 9. Separation-- 10. Event structure-- 11. Linking and framing-- Part IV. Case Studies: 12. Passives-- 13. Resultatives-- Glossary-- References-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521190961 20160618
Argument structure - the pattern of underlying relations between a predicate and its dependents - is at the base of syntactic theory and the theory of the interface with semantics. This comprehensive guide explores the motives for thematic and event-structural decomposition, and its relation to structure in syntax. It also discusses broad patterns in the linking of syntactic to semantic relations, and includes insightful case studies on passive and resultative constructions. Semantically explicit and syntactically impartial, with a careful, interrogative approach, Williams clarifies notions of argument within both lexicalist and nonlexicalist approaches. Ideal for students and researchers in syntactic and semantic theory, this introduction includes: * A comprehensive overview of arguments in syntax and semantics * Discussion questions and suggestions for further reading * A glossary with helpful definitions of key terms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521190961 20160618
Green Library
LINGUIST-232A-01
Book
viii, 278 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Challenges for theories of argument realization-- 2. Semantic role lists-- 3. Current approaches to lexical semantic representation-- 4. Three conceptualizations of events-- 5. The mapping from lexical semantics to syntax-- 6. Thematic hierarchies in argument realization-- 7. Multiple argument realization-- 8. Postscript.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521663311 20160528
The relationship between verbs and their arguments is a widely debated topic in linguistics. This comprehensive survey provides an up-to-date overview of this important area of research, exploring current theories of how a verb's semantics can determine the morphosyntactic realization of its arguments. Assuming a close connection between verb meaning and syntactic structure, it provides a bridge between lexical-semantic and syntactic research, synthesizing the results of work from a range of linguistic subdisciplines and in a variety of theoretical frameworks. The first four chapters survey leading theories about event structure and conceptualization. The fifth and sixth chapters focus on the mapping from lexical semantics to morphosyntax and include a detailed discussion of the thematic hierarchy. The final chapter reviews treatments of multiple argument realization. With useful bibliographic references and clear definitions of relevant terms, this book will be invaluable to students and researchers in syntax and semantics, as well as those in related fields.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521663311 20160528
Green Library
LINGUIST-232A-01
Book
xiii, 336 p.
  • Introduction - unaccusativity introduced, approaches to unaccusativity, deep versus surface unaccusativity, assumptions about lexical representations-- the anatomy of a diagnostic - the resultative construction - the distribution of resultative phrases, the syntax of the resultative construction, semantic restrictions on the resultative construction, alternative accounts of the resultative construction-- the causative alternation - a probe into lexical semantics and argument structure - a causative analysis of alternating unaccusative verbs, a closer look at the causative alternation, verbs of existence and appearance-- the linking of arguments - the linking of rules, ordering the linking rules, comparison with other approaches-- verbs with multiple meanings - rule-governed variable behaviour, consequences for lexical representation, variable behaviour that is not rule-governed-- the problem of locative inversion - locative inversion - an introduction, the verbs found in locative inversion, the discourse function of locative inversion, evidence from various verb classes, unergative verbs in locative inversion, the syntax of locative inversion - is unaccusative analysis necessary?, an alternative account, the larger picture. Appendices: verb classes and their members-- verbs found on locative inversion construction.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262121859 20160528
This text presents an extended investigation into a set of linguistic phenomena that have received much attention over the last 15 years. Besides providing support for David Perlmutter's hypothesis that unaccusativity is syntactically represented but semantically determined, this book contributes to the development of a theory of lexical semantic representation and to the elucidation of the mapping from lexical semantics to syntax. Perlmutter's Unaccusative Hypothesis proposes that there are two classes of intransitive verbs - unergatives and unaccusatives - each associated with a distinct syntactic configuration. Unaccusativity begins by isolating the semantic factors that determine whether a verb will be unaccusative or unergative through a careful examination of the behaviour of intransitive verbs from a range of semantic classes in diverse syntactic constructions. Notable are the extensive discussions of verbs of motion, verbs of emission, and various types of verbs of change of state. The authors then introduce rules that determine the syntactic expression of the arguments of the verbs investigated and examine the interactions among them. The proper treatment of verbs that systematically show multiple meanings - and hence variable classification as unaccusative or unergative - is also considered. In the final chapter, the authors argue that the distribution of locative inversion, a purported unaccusative diagnostic, is determined instead by discourse considerations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262121859 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
LINGUIST-232A-01
Book
xviii, 348 p. ; 24 cm.
In this rich reference work, Beth Levin classifies over 3,000 English verbs according to shared meaning and behavior. Levin starts with the hypothesis that a verb's meaning influences its syntactic behavior and develops it into a powerful tool for studying the English verb lexicon. She shows how identifying verbs with similar syntactic behavior provides an effective means of distinguishing semantically coherent verb classes, and isolates these classes by examining verb behavior with respect to a wide range of syntactic alternations that reflect verb meaning. The first part of the book sets out alternate ways in which verbs can express their arguments. The second presents classes of verbs that share a kernel of meaning and explores in detail the behavior of each class, drawing on the alternations in the first part. Levin's discussion of each class and alternation includes lists of relevant verbs, illustrative examples, comments on noteworthy properties, and bibliographic references. The result is an original, systematic picture of the organization of the verb inventory. Easy to use, English Verb Classes and Alternations sets the stage for further explorations of the interface between lexical semantics and syntax. It will prove indispensable for theoretical and computational linguists, psycholinguists, cognitive scientists, lexicographers, and teachers of English as a second language.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226475325 20160528
Green Library
LINGUIST-232A-01