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Book
390 pages ; 25 cm
  • Patriot royalism : the Stuart monarchy and the turn to prerogative, 1768-1775
  • "One step farther, and we are got back to where we set out from" : patriots and the Royalist theory of representation
  • "The Lord alone shall be king of America" : 1776, common sense, and the Republican turn
  • "The old government, as near as possible" : royalism in the wilderness, 1776-1780
  • "All know that a single magistrate is not a king" : royalism and the constitution of 1787
  • Conclusion: "A new monarchy in America".
Generations of students have been taught that the American Revolution was a revolt against royal tyranny. In this revisionist account, Eric Nelson argues that a great many of our "founding fathers" saw themselves as rebels against the British Parliament, not the Crown. The Royalist Revolution interprets the patriot campaign of the 1770s as an insurrection in favor of royal power--driven by the conviction that the Lords and Commons had usurped the just prerogatives of the monarch.Leading patriots believed that the colonies were the king's own to govern, and they urged George III to defy Parliament and rule directly. These theorists were proposing to turn back the clock on the English constitution, rejecting the Whig settlement that had secured the supremacy of Parliament after the Glorious Revolution. Instead, they embraced the political theory of those who had waged the last great campaign against Parliament's "usurpations" the reviled Stuart monarchs of the seventeenth century.When it came time to design the state and federal constitutions, the very same figures who had defended this expansive conception of royal authority--John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and their allies--returned to the fray as champions of a single executive vested with sweeping prerogatives. As a result of their labors, the Constitution of 1787 would assign its new president far more power than any British monarch had wielded for almost a hundred years. On one side of the Atlantic, Nelson concludes, there would be kings without monarchy; on the other, monarchy without kings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674735347 20170515
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7017-01
Book
xxiii, 698 p. ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The intellectual origins of the constitution
  • Creating a national government
  • The federal judiciary
  • The federal executive
  • The federal legislature
  • Slavery
  • The ratification process : federalists and anti-federalists
  • The Bill of rights
  • The ideological origins of the reconstruction amendments
  • The thirteenth amendment
  • The fourteenth amendment
  • The fifteenth amendment
  • The Supreme Court's use of history
  • The originalism debate.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7017-01
Book
xlix, 470 p. : ill., maps ; 20 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Note on the text
  • Synopsis of the federalist papers
  • Select bibliography
  • A chronology of events 1763/1791
  • Map of the United States circa 1787
  • The federalist papers
  • Appendix : the Constitution of the United States
  • Explanatory notes
  • Thematic index.
'A nation without a national government is an awful spectacle.' In the winter of 1787-8 a series of eighty-five essays appeared in the New York press; the purpose of the essays was to persuade the citizens of New York State to ratify the Constitution of the United States. The three authors - Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay - were respectively the first Secretary of the Treasury, the fourth President, and the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in American history. Each had played a crucial role in the events of the American Revolution; together they were convinced of the need to weld thirteen disparate and newly-independent states into a union. Their essays make the case for a new and united nation, governed under a written Constitution that endures to this day. The Federalist Papers are an indispensable guide to the intentions of the founding fathers who created the United States, and a canonical text in the development of western political thought. This new edition pays full attention to the classical learning of their authors and the historical examples they deploy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780192805928 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01
Book
xxxvii, 648 p. ; 18 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01
Book
xiii, 359 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7017-01
Book
vii, 111 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7017-01
Book
xxiv, 124 p. ; 24 cm.
The central principles of what today is broadly known as political liberalism were made current in large part by Locke's "Second Treatise of Government" (1690). The principles of individual liberty, the rule of law, government by consent of the people, and the right to private property are taken for granted as fundamental to the human condition now. Most liberal theorists writing today look back to Locke as the source of their ideas. Some maintain that religious fundamentalism, 'post-modernism', and socialism are today the only remaining ideological threats to liberalism. To the extent that this is true, these ideologies are ultimately attacks on the ideas that Locke, arguably more than any other, helped to make the universal vocabulary of political discourse.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780915144938 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7017-01
Book
xiv, 653 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7017-01
Book
4 v. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01
Book
560 p. ; 18 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01