Search results

RSS feed for this result

18 results

Book
xxxv, 1262 pages ; 27 cm.
  • An introduction to statutes
  • Representational structures
  • Structures of legislative deliberation
  • Direct democracy
  • Statutes as a source of public policy and legal principle
  • Theories of statutory interpretation
  • Doctrines of statutory interpretation
  • Implementation of statutes in the administrative state
  • Judicial deference to agency interpretations
  • Appendix A: The Constitution of the United States
  • Appendix B: The Supreme Court's canons of statutory interpretation
  • Appendix C: Administrative Procedure Act (selected provisions)
  • Appendix D: Executive orders addressing regulatory planning and review.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-319-01, LAW-665-01
Book
xviii, 484 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Congress and lawmaking
  • The Congressional budget process
  • Preliminary legislative action
  • Scheduling legislation in the House
  • House floor procedure
  • Scheduling legislation in the Senate
  • Senate floor procedure
  • Resolving House-Senate differences
  • Legislative oversight
  • A dynamic process.
As a governing body, Congress continually adapts to changes in process and practice. This procedural context governs every aspect of the House and Senate and affects lawmakers as they make voting decisions, expedite or delay legislation, or defeat a bill. Walter OleszekEs definitive work examines how the majority and minority parties use procedural devices to achieve their political goals and offers an assessment of the role of conference committees in reconciling bicameral differences. Not shying away from the complexity of the topic, Oleszek ensures that the machinations of Congress are understandable through an array of interesting examples, cases, and anecdotes that he is well-positioned to witness and experience first-hand.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452226033 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-532-01, LAW-665-01
Book
v. (loose-leaf) : forms ; 25 cm.
  • Overview
  • Ethical considerations
  • Commitment (and other) letters
  • Preliminary considerations
  • Documenatry aspects of lender liability avoidance
  • The borrower : identity, capacity, and authority
  • Opinion of the borrower's counsel
  • The loan agreement
  • The promissory note
  • The security agreement
  • The financing statement
  • Pledges
  • Landlord's waiver
  • Where to file. Where to search. Notices
  • Real estate collateral
  • Special forms of collateral
  • Guaranties
  • Subordination agreements
  • Intercreditor agreements
  • Insurance
  • Environmental concerns
  • Opinion letter to the lender
  • Processing the paperwork
  • Post-closing changes
  • Workouts and forbearance agreements
  • Debtor-in-possession financing and use of cash collateral
  • Table of forms
  • Index.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01
Book
xxviii, 468 pages ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction to American law and legal writing
  • Rule-based reasoning
  • An introduction to judicial decisions and statutes
  • Inside the writing process
  • More about writing
  • Office memoranda
  • Predictive writing
  • Selecting authority
  • Working with statutes
  • Working with precedent
  • Working with facts
  • A paradigm for organizing proof of a conclusion of law
  • Varying the depth of rule proof and rule application
  • Combining proofs of separate conclusions of law
  • Working with the paradigm
  • Paragraphing
  • Effective style
  • Quotations
  • Professional email
  • Orally reporting research results
  • Client advice letters
  • Developing a persuasive theory
  • Developing persuasive arguments
  • Motion memoranda
  • Point headings and subheadings
  • Statements of the case (or facts)
  • Appellate practice
  • Appellate briefs
  • Writing the appellate brief
  • Questions presented
  • Oral argument.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-219-01, LAW-665-01, LAW-7816-01, LAW-7827-01
Book
xli, 996 p. ; 26 cm.
  • The legislative process and statutory interpretation --Canons of construction
  • The constitutional position of administrative agencies
  • The regulatory process
  • Statutory interpretation in the administrative state.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
xvii, 583 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
xii, 279 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Senate procedure and practice
  • Legislative business
  • Floor debates
  • Legislation and committee procedures
  • Bills and joint resolutions
  • The amendment process
  • Voting in the Senate
  • Finalizing legislation to send to the president's desk
  • The appropriations and budget processes
  • Executive business and the executive calendar.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
xix, 314 p. ; 23 cm.
The second edition of Charles Fox's best-selling paperback guide, updates the original edition published in 2002. The perfect resource for new associates, law school students, business people, or anyone who frequently deals with complex contracts, the second edition expands existing material on contract covenants and remedies for breach of a covenant; due diligence conditions; organisation of the agreement; credit-related provisions; acquisition-related provisions; the integration clause; and indemnification. Other miscellaneous revisions are found in every chapter of the Second Edition. In addition, the glossary and the index have been thoroughly revised. In its updated form, "Working with Contracts" remains the most useful and practical guide for anyone dealing with sophisticated agreements.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402410604 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
xxiii, 388 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The players
  • The instruments
  • Accounting matters
  • Bankruptcy: rules of the endgame
  • The issuer and the obligation: recourse, ranking, rights, and remedies
  • Beyond the issuer: corporate structure issues
  • Commitments, conditions, pricing, and risk; liquidity support and credit support; credit derivatives
  • A deal in time
  • Contract structure and key elements
  • Housekeeping, insurance, and information convenants
  • Debt and liens (negative pledges)
  • General business convenants
  • Financial convenants
  • Amendments, waivers, and control provisions
  • Risk-based review; transactions analysis
  • Best practices.
The new "Drafting for Corporate Finance" is an essential primer and handbook for attorneys in their early years of corporate finance lawyering, as well as a useful refresher for experienced practitioners.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402408823 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01
Book
xxix, 346 p. ; 19 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01
Book
xviii, 543 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Debt and interest
  • Present value
  • Real estate
  • Annuities and retirement plans
  • Insurance
  • Accounting and financial reporting
  • Valuation of a going business
  • Federal taxation
  • Insolvency and bankruptcy
  • Business organizations
  • Corporations
  • Securities regulation
  • Mergers and acquisitions
  • Trading in stocks and bonds
  • Options, futures, and derivatives
  • Investment companies.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
xviii, 618 p. ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
xix, 164 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-219-01, LAW-665-01, LAW-7816-01, LAW-7827-01
Book
xii, 363 p. ; 25 cm.
  • CONTENTS-- INTRODUCTION-- 1. In Substance, and In Principle, the Same as It Was Heretofore: The Customary Constitution-- 2. A Rule Obligatory Upon Every Department: The Origins of Judicial Review-- 3. The Power Under the Constitution Will Always Be in the People: The Making of the Constitution-- 4. Courts, as Well as Other Departments, Are Bound by That Instrument: Accepting Judicial Review-- 5. What Every True Republican Ought to Depend On: Rejecting Judicial Supremacy-- 6. Notwithstanding This Abstract View: The Changing Context of Constitutional Law-- 7. To Preserve the Constitution, as a Perpetual Bond of Union: The Lessons of Experience-- 8. A Layman's Document, Not a Lawyer's Contract: The Continuing Struggle for Popular Constitutionalism-- 9. As An American: Popular Constitutionalism, Circa 2003-- EPILOGUE.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195169188 20160528
The United States Constitution is the foundational document of the longest and most successful democratic experiment in modern human history. It not only serves as the legal bedrock for the world's most powerful nation-state but also, more broadly, reflects that nation's fundamental commitments as a society. Who then has the authority to interpret a blueprint of such extraordinary influence? Americans have come to treat the Constitution as somehow beyond the purview, even the competence, of the average American citizen. Only lawyers, judges, and academics are deemed fit to state what exactly the Constitution means. This elitist reliance on expert judgement is a radical and troublesome departure from the founding fathers' intent. America's Founding generation, in darling contrast, embraced a political ideology that celebrated the central role of the "the people" in supplying government with its energy and direction, an ideal that remained at all times in the forefront of their thinking-Federalist and Anti-Federalist alike. In this groundbreaking interpretation of America's founding and of its entire system of judicial review, Larry Kramer reveals that the colonists fought for and birthed a very different system - and held a very different understanding of citizenship - than Americans believe to be the norm today. "Popular sovreignty" was no historical abstraction nor was the notion of "the people" invoked largely as a flip rhetorical convenience on the campaign trail. Important trials and the prospective passage of the influentional legislation such as the Alien Act - which granted a president the power to imprison or even deport immigrants - were met with vigorous public debate. The outcomes were greeted with celebratory feasts and bonfires, or riotous resistance. In short, Americans drew a clear parallel between the law and the lived reality of their daily existence. Theis self-sovreignty in law as much as politics was active not abstract. With this book, Larry Kramer vaults to the forefront of Constitutional interpretation. In the process, he rekindles the original spark of "we the people", inviting every citizen to join him in enlivening the seemingly deadened sensibilities that mark the relationship between Americans and their constitutional past, present, and future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195169188 20160528
In this groundbreaking interpretation of America's founding and of its entire system of judicial review, Larry Kramer reveals that the colonists fought for and created a very different system-and held a very different understanding of citizenship-than Americans believe to be the norm today. "Popular sovereignty" was not just some historical abstraction, and the notion of "the people" was more than a flip rhetorical device invoked on the campaign trail. Questions of constitutional meaning provoked vigorous public debate and the actions of government officials were greeted with celebratory feasts and bonfires, or riotous resistance. Americans treated the Constitution as part of the lived reality of their daily existence. Their self-sovereignty in law as much as politics was active not abstract.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195306453 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-5017-01, LAW-665-01
Book
1 v. (loose-leaf) : forms ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
1 v. (loose-leaf) : forms ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
x, 64 p. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01
Book
1 v. (loose-leaf) ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-665-01, LAW-7815-01