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Book
xvi, 353 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction: Disaster relief and the welfare state
  • Building the sympathetic state
  • Innovations
  • The spreading delta
  • Crafting the Depression
  • The bomb-proof power
  • The well-beaten path
  • We lost our all
  • Postscript: Living in a sympathetic state.
Even as unemployment rates soared during the Great Depression, FDR's relief and social security programs faced attacks in Congress and the courts on the legitimacy of federal aid to the growing population of poor. In response, "New Dealers" pointed to a long tradition - dating back to 1790 and now largely forgotten - of federal aid to victims of disaster. In "The Sympathetic State", Michele Landis Dauber recovers this crucial aspect of American history, tracing the roots of the modern American welfare state beyond the New Deal and the Progressive Era back to the earliest days of the republic when relief was forthcoming for the victims of wars, fires, floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes. Drawing on a variety of materials, including newspapers, legal briefs, political speeches, art and literature of the time, and letters from thousands of ordinary Americans, Dauber shows that while this long history of government disaster relief has faded from our memory today, it was extremely well-known to advocates of an expanded role for the national government in the 1930s. Making this connection required framing the Great Depression as a disaster afflicting citizens through no fault of their own. Dauber argues that the disaster paradigm, though successful in defending the New Deal, would ultimately come back to haunt advocates for social welfare. By not making a more radical case for relief, proponents of the New Deal helped create the weak, uniquely American welfare state we have today - one torn between the desire to come to the aid of those suffering and the deeply rooted suspicion that those in need are responsible for their own deprivation. Contrary to conventional thought, the history of federal disaster relief is one of remarkable consistency, despite significant political and ideological change. Dauber's pathbreaking and highly readable book uncovers the historical origins of the modern American welfare state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226923499 20160609
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01, LAW-738-01
Book
lv, 1042 : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The legal system at work : what we know and how we know it
  • The impact of society on law
  • The impact of law on society
  • The legal system as a social structure : structure, rules and roles
  • Law, culture, and history.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01, LAW-8011-01, LAW-8011-01
Book
404 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
xx, 376 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Chicago lawyers revisited
  • The changing character of lawyers' work / with Ethan Michelson
  • Integration and separation
  • Prestige
  • Organizations
  • Careers / with Kathleen E. Hull
  • Income and income inequality
  • Divided opinions / with Monique R. Payne
  • Community roles / with Paul S. Schnorr
  • Connections within the bar
  • A satisfying profession? / with Kathleen E. Hull and Ava A. Harter
  • The processes of change.
Over the past several decades, the number of lawyers in large cities has doubled, women have entered the bar at an unprecedented rate, and the scale of firms has greatly expanded. This immense growth has transformed the nature and social structure of the legal profession. In the most comprehensive analysis of the urban bar to date, Urban Lawyers presents a compelling portrait of how these changes continue to shape the field of law today. Drawing on extensive interviews with Chicago lawyers, the authors demonstrate how developments in the profession have affected virtually every aspect of the work and careers of urban lawyers - their relationships with clients, job tenure and satisfaction, income, social and political values, networks of professional connections, and patterns of participation in the broader community. Yet despite the dramatic changes, much remains the same. Stratification of income and power based on gender, race, and religious background, for instance, still maintains inequality within the bar. The authors of Urban Lawyers conclude that organizational priorities will likely determine the future direction of the legal profession. And with this landmark study as their guide, readers will be able to make their own informed predictions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226325408 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01, LAW-681G-01, LAW-681G-01
Book
xv, 228 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • ch. 1. On the sociology of deviance
  • ch. 2. The Puritans of Massachusetts Bay
  • ch. 3. The shapes of the devil
  • ch. 4. Stabilities and instabilities in Puritan crime rates
  • ch. 5. Puritanism and deviancy.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01

6. Four trials [2004]

Book
xvii, 237 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
x, 259 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Overworked Americans or the growth of leisure?
  • Working time from the perspective of families
  • Do Americans feel overworked?
  • How work spills over into life
  • The structure and culture of work
  • American workers in cross-national perspective / with Janet C. Gornick
  • Bridging the time divide
  • Where do we go from here?
In a panoramic study that draws on diverse sources, Jerry Jacobs and Kathleen Gerson explain why and how time pressures have emerged and what we can do to alleviate them. In contrast to the conventional wisdom that all Americans are overworked, they show that time itself has become a form of social inequality that is dividing Americans in new ways - between the overworked and the underemployed, women and men, parents and non-parents. They piece together a compelling story of the increasing mismatch between our economic system and the needs of American families, sorting out important trends such as the rise of demanding jobs and the emergence of new pressures on dual-earner families and single parents. Comparing American workers with their European peers, Jacobs and Gerson also find that policies that are simultaneously family-friendly and gender equitable are not fully realised in any of the countries they examine. As a consequence, they argue that the United States needs to forge a new set of solutions that offer American workers new ways to integrate work and family life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674011533 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
xv, 912 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Law, lawyers, and popular culture / Friedman, Lawrence M.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
xxxvii, 525 p. ; 23 cm.
A re-issue of this classic study of President Roosevelt's administrative policy toward monopoly during the period of the New Deal, updated with an introduction by the author.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823216093 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
xiv, 351 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
x, 274 p. ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01
Book
393 p. illus. 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-538-01