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Book
xv, 554 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Since its inception in Illinois in 1899, the juvenile court has become a remarkable legal and social institution all over the developed world, one that plays a singular role in modern government. At its founding, the juvenile court was intended to reverse longstanding legal traditions, and place the child's interests first in areas of law ranging from dependency to delinquency. Yet in recent years, legal responses to youths' offences have undergone striking changes, as more juveniles are being transferred to adult courts and serving adult sentences. "A Century of Juvenile Justice" is the first standard, comprehensive and comparative reference work to span the history and current state of juvenile justice. An extraordinary assemblage of leading authorities have produced an accessible, illustrated document, designed as a reference for everyone from probation and police to students, educators, lawyers and social workers. Editors' introductions place into context each of the book's five sections, which consider the history of the ideas around which the system was organized and the institutions and practices that resulted; the ways in which this set of institutions and practices interacts with other aspects of government policy toward children in the US and in other nations; and also the ways in which changing social and legal meanings of childhood and youth have continued to influence juvenile justice. The doctrine and institutions of juvenile justice in Europe, Japan, England and Scotland are profiled in depth to show the range of modern responses to youth crime and child endangerment. This comparative material provides a fresh basis for judging the direction of policy in the US.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226727837 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-417-01