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Book
cx, 1494 pages ; 27 cm.
  • The development and structure of the federal judicial system
  • The nature of the federal judicial function : cases and controversies
  • The original jurisdiction of the Supreme Court
  • Congressional control of the distribution of judicial power among federal and state courts
  • Review of state court decisions by the Supreme Court
  • The law applied in civil actions in the district courts
  • Federal common law
  • The federal question jurisdiction of the district courts
  • Suits challenging official action
  • Judicial federalism : limitations on district court jurisdiction or its exercise
  • Federal habeas corpus
  • Advanced problems in judicial federalism
  • The diversity jurisdiction of the federal district courts.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2403-01, LAW-294-01, LAW-294-01
Book
v, 451 p. ; 26 cm.
  • The story of Marbury v. Madison : judicial authority and political struggle / William Michael Treanor
  • The story of ex parte McCardle : the power of Congress to limit the Supreme Court's appellate jurisdiction / Daniel J. Meltzer
  • The story of Klein : the scope of Congress's authority to shape the jurisdiction of the federal courts / Amanda L. Tyler
  • The story of Michigan v. Long : Supreme Court review and the workings of American federalism / Edward A. Purcell, Jr.
  • The story of Tarble's case : state habeas and federal detention / Ann Woolhandler and Michael Collins
  • Riding the color line : the story of Railroad Commission of Texas v. Pullman Co. / Lauren Robel
  • The story of Fay v. Noia : another case about another federalism / Larry Yackle
  • "Not a happy precedent" : the story of ex parte Quirin / Carlos M. Vázquez
  • The story of ex parte Young : once controversial, now canon / Barry Friedman
  • The story of Bivens v. Six Unknown Named Agents of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics / James E. Pfander
  • The story of Santa Clara Pueblo v. Martinez : tribal sovereignty, sex equality and the federal courts / Catherine T. Struve
  • Sovereignties : federal, state and tribal : the story of Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida / Vicki C. Jackson and Judith Resnik
  • The story of Crowell : grounding the administrative state / Mark Tushnet
  • The story of Lincoln Mills : jurisdiction and the source of law / David L. Shapiro
  • The story of Banco Nacional de Cuba v. Sabbatino : federal judicial power in foreign relations cases / Ernest A. Young.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01
Book
xlix, 470 p. : ill., maps ; 20 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Note on the text
  • Synopsis of the federalist papers
  • Select bibliography
  • A chronology of events 1763/1791
  • Map of the United States circa 1787
  • The federalist papers
  • Appendix : the Constitution of the United States
  • Explanatory notes
  • Thematic index.
'A nation without a national government is an awful spectacle.' In the winter of 1787-8 a series of eighty-five essays appeared in the New York press; the purpose of the essays was to persuade the citizens of New York State to ratify the Constitution of the United States. The three authors - Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay - were respectively the first Secretary of the Treasury, the fourth President, and the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in American history. Each had played a crucial role in the events of the American Revolution; together they were convinced of the need to weld thirteen disparate and newly-independent states into a union. Their essays make the case for a new and united nation, governed under a written Constitution that endures to this day. The Federalist Papers are an indispensable guide to the intentions of the founding fathers who created the United States, and a canonical text in the development of western political thought. This new edition pays full attention to the classical learning of their authors and the historical examples they deploy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780192805928 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01
Book
xxxvii, 648 p. ; 18 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01
Book
240 p. ; 24 cm.
The Civil War brought pressure on the Constitution that had never been seen before and hasn't been seen since, testing it in much the same way as an engineer tests his materials to destruction to assess their structure. Did the South have the right to secede? Did Abraham Lincoln trample on the Bill of Rights? Can the president go to war without congressional approval? What is the nature of the Union, and what are the limits of states' rights? Forced to confront these issues during the Civil War, Lincoln ran squarely into the conflicts and the issues at the heart of our constitution, issues that remain with us today. Daniel Farber's purpose in "Lincoln's Constitution" is to lead the reader to understand exactly what Lincoln did, what arguments he made in defence of his actions, and how his words and deeds fit into the context of the times. Farber sets the constitutional problems that arose during Lincoln's term within their historical moment, as illuminated by recent work by historians, and investigates how well Lincoln's views hold up today - over a century later. The answers are crucial not only for a better understanding of the Civil War but also for shedding light on issues that the courts struggle with now: state sovereignty, presidential power, and national security limitations on civil liberties. The first book in over 75 years to evaluate Lincoln's legal legacy comprehensively, "Lincoln's Constitution" is a blend of history and constitutional thought. Written for the intelligent reader, its insights speak urgently to us as our nation again finds itself in a time of danger and the limits of constitutional law are once more being tested.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226237930 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01
Book
515 p. ; 20 cm.
Written at a time when furious arguments were raging about the best way to govern America, "The Federalist Papers" had the immediate practical aim of persuading New Yorkers to accept the newly drafted Constitution in 1787. In this they were supremely successful, but their influence also transcended contemporary debate to win them a lasting place in discussions of American political theory. Acclaimed by Thomas Jefferson as 'the best commentary on the principles of government which ever was written', "The Federalist Papers" make a powerful case for power-sharing between State and Federal authorities and for a Constitution that has endured largely unchanged for two hundred years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140444957 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01
Book
xxviii, 478 p. ; 18 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01
Book
xxxii, 332 p. ; 20 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01
Book
4 v. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01
Book
560 p. ; 18 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-294-01, LAW-7017-01