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Book
xxxvi, 567 p. : ill. ; 26 cm. + 1 computer disk (3 1/2 in.).
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01, LAW-207-02
Book
xxx, 941 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01
Book
viii, 340 p. ; 25 cm.
How Linux and the free software movement undercut the high-tech titans. A riveting look at the rise and popular acceptance of Linux and how free software is changing the nature of business and wealth. Linux and the Free Software Movement began its siege on the seemingly unshakeable Microsoft in 1999. But the story began as far back as 1984 when Richard Stallman, a prolific code writer, founded the Free Software Movement in an effort to break the bureaucratic stranglehold he saw forming in the computer industry. Enter Linus Torvalds in the early'90s, a coding genius and a long-time Stallman disciple, who became the master of Linux code. The result: a marketplace where the best software solutions win and monolithic computer Goliaths are faced with the proverbial David. Free for All tells the fascinating story of how a simple idea provided a framework that organised thousands of open code users and revolutionised the nature of business. It also tells how a group of passionate people have dedicated their lives to creating software that's easier--and cheaper--than Microsoft's to use.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780066620503 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01
Book
xvi, 270 p. ; 25 cm.
  • The information society-- four puzzles-- the public and private realms-- information economics-- intellectual property and the liberal state-- copyright and the invention of authorship-- blackmail-- insider trading and the romantic entrepreneur-- spleens-- stereotyping information and searching for an author-- the international political economy of authorship-- private censors, transgenic slavery, and electronic indenture-- proposals and objections.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674805224 20160527
Who owns your genetic information? Might it be the doctors who, in the course of removing your spleen, decode a few cells and turn them into a patented product? In 1990 the Supreme Court of California said yes, marking another milestone on the information superhighway. This case is one of the many that James Boyle takes up in "Shamans, Software and Spleens", a look at the problems posed by the information society. Boyle discusses topics ranging from blackmail and insider trading to artificial intelligence (with stops in microeconomics, intellectual property, and cultural studies along the way). In the 1990s information is power, and questions about who owns it, who controls it, and who gets to use it carry powerful implications. These are the questions Boyle explores in matters as diverse as autodialers and direct advertising, electronic bulletin boards and consumer databases, ethno-botany and indigenous pharmaceuticals, the right of publicity (why Johhny Carson owns the phrase "Here's Johnny!"), and the right to privacy (does J.D. Salinger "own" the letter's he's sent?). Boyle finds that our ideas about intellectual property rights rest on the notion of the Romantic author - a notion that Boyle maintains is not only outmoded but actually counterproductive, restricting debate, slowing innovation and widening the gap between rich and poor nations. What emerges from this discussion is an argument for relaxing the initial protection of authors' works and expanding the concept of fair use of information. For those with an interest in the legal, ethical and economic ramifications of the dissemination of information - in short, for every member of the information society, willing or unwilling - this book makes its case.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674805224 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01
Book
xiii, 438 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01
Book
xiii, 332 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The restructuring of corporate America
  • The war against insider trading
  • The criminalization of regulatory offenses
  • Rudy Giuliani's reign of terror
  • The end of Drexel
  • Was Milken guilty?
  • Michael Milken and the savings and loan crisis
  • Charles Keating and Lincoln Savings
  • More S & L scapegoats
  • More victims : Fred Carr and executive life
  • Assessment.
According to James Stewart's Den of Thieves, what happened on Wall Street in the '80s was really simple. Due to the crimes of Michael Milken and others, Stewart states: "the ownership of entire corporations changed hands, often forcibly, at a clip never before witnessed, " "[h]ousehold names ... vanished in takeovers that spawned criminal activity and violations of the securities laws, " "thousands of workers lost their jobs, " "profits were sacrificed, " and "bondholders and shareholders lost many millions more." "These, " he writes, "are the costs of greed coupled with market power." But according to Daniel Fischel, this popular view is completely wrong.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01

7. Den of thieves [1991]

Book
493 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
An account of how Ivan Boesky, Michael Milken and their accomplices created a series of financial frauds on a vast scale, and of the chase that finally brought them to justice. The author is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who also wrote "The Partners" and "The Prosecutors".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780671638023 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-2009-01