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Book
x, 305 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Contents and AbstractsIntroduction: The Death of an Arab Jew chapter abstractThis chapter contextualizes the history of Iraqi Jews in Israel within Zionist, Mizrahi, Arab, and global histories. While liberal Zionist discourse emphasizes that Israel before 1967 was an ethical society, attempting to meet the challenges of survival and migration, the Introduction argues that the period from 1948 to 1967 was one of the most horrific eras in Israel's history, when many of its citizens, Jews and Arabs alike, were faced with losing their past homes, livelihoods, and, essentially, everything that they had, amid the indifference of the people living around them. This chapter describes how the state interacted with the Iraqi Jewish community as a project of social engineering, wherein state elites believed that all immigrants, especially Middle Eastern Jews, needed to become Hebrew-speaking, socialist Zionists. 1Human Material chapter abstractThis chapter shows that Iraqi Jews in Israel were migrant-citizens. They had been granted citizenship rights upon their arrival, so that they could vote in general elections and receive welfare benefits and social services. Nonetheless, because the authorities believed they came from a primitive country and were in need of discipline, and because the state did not have resources to attend to their needs, Iraqi Jews were treated as migrant-citizens, namely, as people who should be thankful for the little they got and who were undeserving of full citizenship rights. Iraqi Jews, as well as other groups of migrants to Israel, were classified as "human material, " a classification that reflects their dependency on the state and their dehumanization as a result of migration. 2Children of Iraq, Children of Israel chapter abstractThis chapter tells the story of Iraqi-Jewish children in Israel, who grew up in transit camps, in the poor neighborhoods, and on kibbutzim. These children were quicker to adjust to the new living conditions in Israel as their memories of Iraq faded and they learned Hebrew. And yet, these children were the most vulnerable group among the newcomers. They suffered from malnutrition-- their parents could not always deal with the pain of displacement and sometimes took out their anger on their children-- they attended poor-quality schools-- and they often had to leave school to work to support their families. These able and creative children, however, learned how to adjust to the new conditions and challenge and resist the state. 3The Only Democracy in the Middle East chapter abstractThis chapter proposes that the Israeli political system, despite being only partially democratic, offered venues in which Iraqi Jews could voice their complaints. It looks at political parties that had Iraqi-Jewish members who were active in the transit camps and published in the Arabic newspapers of various political parties. The chapter explores Iraqi-Jewish involvement in these organizations and analyzes how parties' leaders conceptualized their relationship to Iraqi Jews. Despite the parties' efforts at outreach, however, none of the political organizations in Israel offered a comprehensive solution to the Iraqi problem. At each and every step of the way, the parties' refusal to recognize the racism of their own members curtailed the possibility of providing a genuine solution. 4Elements of Resistance chapter abstractFocusing on the issue of political action, this chapter explores elements of resistance to the state's politics. Despite being poor migrants, Iraqi Jews became subversive political actors. From transit camps to the streets of towns, Iraqi Jews resisted the state's housing and employment politics, wrote and sang protest songs, established local committees to negotiate their concerns with the state, showered the state's ministries and administrative bodies with petitions, and destroyed public property. Some were successful in that they managed to secure livelihoods for unemployed individuals, improve their living conditions, or gain employment. Others' protests were less successful in achieving the newcomers' goals, but were effective in raising public awareness of the sufferings of Iraqi Jews. 5Israeli Babylonians chapter abstractThis chapter highlights three identities of the Iraqi-Jewish community that emerged during the 1950s and 1960s in Israel. The first is Iraqi-- facing hardships in Israel, Iraq became the Promised Land for many Iraqi Jews. The second was Arab-Jewish-- Iraqi Jews continued writing and communicating in Arabic with Arabic-speaking Israeli Jews and Palestinians. Their mastery of Arabic also made them valuable to the state as teachers, translators, and members of the state's security apparatus. The third was Mizrahi, an identity shaped through the struggle against Ashkenazi hegemony, which connected Iraqi Jews to other non-European Jews. The intertwining of these identities created Israelis of Iraqi descent, who were critical of the Ashkenazi establishment, and yet considered themselves Israeli patriots. Conclusion: The Death of Arab Jewishness chapter abstractThe chapter looks at the history of Iraqi Jews in Israel after 1967. It suggests that contemporary Mizrahi debates have their roots in the 1950s and 1960s, when some Iraqi Jews chose to focus on exclusively the Mizrahi and Iraqi struggle for civil rights, while others, especially communists, sided with the Palestinian struggle. Today, Mizrahi radicals are torn on the issue of the connections, or their absence, between their struggles and those of other oppressed groups in Israel, especially the Palestinians. Looking ahead, it seems very plausible that Israel will become a more segregated society, where Iraqi Jews will still partake of Mizrahi Arab culture as produced in Israel, yet will struggle as Jews in the Jewish state.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602656 20170829
Between 1949 and 1951, 123,000 Iraqi Jews immigrated to the newly established Israeli state. Lacking the resources to absorb them all, the Israeli government resettled them in maabarot, or transit camps, relegating them to poverty. In the tents and shacks of the camps, their living conditions were squalid and unsanitary. Basic necessities like water were in short supply, when they were available at all. Rather than returning to a homeland as native sons, Iraqi Jews were newcomers in a foreign place. Impossible Exodus tells the story of these Iraqi Jews' first decades in Israel. Faced with ill treatment and discrimination from state officials, Iraqi Jews resisted: they joined Israeli political parties, demonstrated in the streets, and fought for the education of their children, leading a civil rights struggle whose legacy continues to influence contemporary debates in Israel. Orit Bashkin sheds light on their everyday lives and their determination in a new country, uncovering their long, painful transformation from Iraqi to Israeli. In doing so, she shares the resilience and humanity of a community whose story has yet to be told.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602656 20170829
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xxiii, 597 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • PROLOGUE.- 1. OTTOMAN SOCIETY, PALESTINE, AND THE ORIGINS OF ZIONISM, 1516-1914.- 2. WORLD WAR I, GREAT BRITAIN, AND THE PEACE SETTLEMENTS: Deciding Palestine's Fate, 1914-1921.- 3. PALESTINE BETWEEN THE WARS: Zionism, the Palestinian Arabs, and the British Mandate, 1920-1939.- 4. WORLD WAR II AND THE CREATION OF THE STATE OF ISRAEL, 1939-1949.- 5. THE BEGINNING OF THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT: Regional Strife and Cold War Rivalries, 1949-1957.- 6. FROM SUEZ TO THE SIX-DAY WAR, 1957-1967.- 7. LAND, WAR, AND DIPLOMACY: Shifting Calculations in a Cold War Context, 1967-1976.- 8. LEBANON, THE WEST BANK, AND THE CAMP DAVID ACCORDS: The Palestinian Equation in the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1977-1984.- 9. FROM PARIAH TO PARTNER: The PLO and the Quest for Peace in Global and Regional Contexts, 1984-1993 Peace Gambits, Terrorism, and Political Strife, 1984-1987.- 10. ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN/ARAB NEGOTIATIONS AND AGREEMENTS, 1993-1999.- 11. THE OSLO PROCESS UNDONE: Camp David 2000, Palestinian Rebellion/Factionalism, and Israeli Unilateralism: Identities in Conflict, 1999-2015.- EPILOGUE.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781319028053 20180813
The gold standard of texts on the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict provides a comprehensive, balanced, and accessible narrative of a complex historical topic. The ninth edition explores the relationships among peoples and events and guides students through the often complex web of circumstances, parties, and personalities that constitute the story of Palestinian-Israeli relations. The narrative is supported by more than 40 primary documents that highlight perspectives from all sides of the struggle. Throughout the book, the author examines how underlying issues, group motives, religious and cross-cultural clashes, diplomacy and imperialism, and the arrival of the modern era shaped this volatile region. Maps, photographs, chronologies, public opinion polls, and discussion questions help facilitate student understanding. A fully updated final chapter makes this the most current history of the topic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781319028053 20180813
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
x, 368 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
An enthralling, big-picture history that examines the Six-Day War, its causes, and its enduring consequences against its global context One fateful week in June 1967 redrew the map of the Middle East. Many scholars have documented how the Six-Day War unfolded, but little has been done to explain why the conflict happened at all. As we approach its fiftieth anniversary, Guy Laron refutes the widely accepted belief that the war was merely the result of regional friction, revealing the crucial roles played by American and Soviet policies in the face of an encroaching global economic crisis, and restoring Syria's often overlooked centrality to events leading up to the hostilities. The Six-Day War effectively sowed the seeds for the downfall of Arab nationalism, the growth of Islamic extremism, and the animosity between Jews and Palestinians. In this important new work, Laron's fresh interdisciplinary perspective and extensive archival research offer a significant reassessment of a conflict-and the trigger-happy generals behind it-that continues to shape the modern world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300222708 20170418
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01

4. The wanted 18 [2014]

Video
1 videodisc (75 min.) : sound, color with black and white sequences ; 4 3/4 in Sound: digital; video. Projection: widescreen. Video: DVD. Digital: video file; DVD; region 1.
It's 1987, and the first Palestinian popular movement in the West Bank is rising. Residents want local alternatives to Israeli goods, including milk, which they've been buying from an Israeli company.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xv, 330 p. : ill.
  • From settlers to sovereigns
  • The formation of the liberal settler state
  • Citizenship as a category of exclusion
  • Spectacles of sovereignty
  • Both citizens and strangers.
eReserve
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xiv, 445 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
  • Questions marks
  • At first sight, 1897
  • Into the Valley, 1921
  • Orange grove, 1939
  • Masada, 1942
  • Lydda, 1948
  • Housing estate, 1957
  • The Project, 1967
  • Settlement, 1975
  • Gaza Beach, 1991
  • Peace, 1993
  • J'accuse, 1999
  • Sex, drugs, and the Israeli condition, 2000
  • Up the Galilee, 2003
  • Reality shock, 2006
  • Occupy Rothschild, 2011
  • Existential challenge, 2013
  • By the sea.
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
viii, 316 : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Prologue : the first year of the occupation
  • part 1. A short history of the occupation regime. The first decade
  • The second decade
  • Uprisings, separations, and subjugations
  • part 2. Ruling the noncitizens. The order of violence
  • Abandoning Gaza
  • part 3. The Israeli regime. The conceptual scheme
  • Structural divisions and state projects
  • Recruitment
  • Conclusion : toward a new regime.
Since the start of the occupation of Palestinian territories in 1967, Israel's domination of the Palestinians has deprived an entire population of any political status or protection. But even decades on, most people speak of this rule - both in everyday political discussion and in legal and academic debates - as temporary, as a state of affairs incidental and external to the Israeli regime. In The One-State Condition, Ariella Azoulay and Adi Ophir directly challenge this belief. Looking closely at the history and contemporary formation of the ruling apparatus - the technologies and operations of the Israeli army, the General Security Services, and the legal system imposed in the Occupied Territories - Azoulay and Ophir outline the one-state condition of Israel/Palestine: the grounding principle of Israeli governance is the perpetuation of differential rule over populations of differing status. Israeli citizenship is shaped through the active denial of Palestinian citizenship and civil rights. Though many Israelis, on both political right and left, agree that the occupation constitutes a problem for Israeli democracy, few ultimately admit that Israel is no democracy or question the very structure of the Israeli regime itself. Too frequently ignored are the lasting effects of the deceptive denial of the events of 1948 and 1967, and the ways in which the resulting occupation has reinforced the sweeping militarization and recent racialization of Israeli society. Azoulay and Ophir show that acknowledgment of the one-state condition is not only a prerequisite for considering a one- or two-state solution; it is a prerequisite for advancing new ideas to move beyond the trap of this false dilemma.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804775922 20160610
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xii, 227 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Note on Transliteration-- Acknowledgments-- Introduction Chapter 1. Palestinian Christian Elites from the Late Ottoman Era to the British Mandate-- Chapter 2. Reinventing the Millet System: British Imperial Policy and the Making of Communal Politics-- Chapter 3. The Arab Orthodox Movement-- Chapter 4. Appropriating Sectarianism: The Brief Emergence of Pan-Christian Communalism, 1929-1936-- Chapter 5. Palestinian Arab Episcopalians under Mandate-- Epilogue. The Consequences of Sectarianism Notes-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292726536 20160606
Drawing on a rich base of British archival materials, Arabic periodicals, and secondary sources, Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine brings to light the ways in which the British colonial state in Palestine exacerbated sectarianism. By transforming Muslim, Christian, and Jewish religious identities into legal categories, Laura Robson argues, the British ultimately marginalized Christian communities in Palestine. Robson explores the turning points that developed as a result of such policies, many of which led to permanent changes in the region's political landscapes. Cases include the British refusal to support Arab Christian leadership within Greek-controlled Orthodox churches, attempts to avert involvement from French or Vatican-related groups by sidelining Latin and Eastern Rite Catholics, and interfering with Arab Christians' efforts to cooperate with Muslims in objecting to Zionist expansion. Challenging the widespread but mistaken notion that violent sectarianism was endemic to Palestine, Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine shows that it was intentionally stoked in the wake of British rule beginning in 1917, with catastrophic effects well into the twenty-first century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292726536 20160606
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xxix, 432 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
On 2 November 1917, after much discussion, the British War Cabinet under Lloyd George finally approved and issued a statement in the form of a short letter from the Foreign Office to the English Zionist, Lord Rothschild. It was signed by the foreign Secretary, Arthur Balfour and contained the key short paragraph that began: 'His Majesty's Government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object '. "The Balfour Declaration", as it came to be known, set in motion a series of events, entirely unforeseen by its authors, which shaped the modern world and continues to shape it. Conceived against a backdrop of the First World War, its midwives were an extraordinary cast of diplomats, scholars, soldiers and spies, Arab insurgents and Zionist zealots. It is a tale full of intrigue, betrayal, adventure, death and triumph. And ranges from London to Cairo to the Deserts of Arabia, where the enigmatic figure of T.E. Lawrence achieved lasting fame. Alongside the scrap of paper with which Chamberlain returned from Munich in 1938, the "Balfour Declaration" is one of the most important documents of the last 100 years and Jonathan Schneer's scrupulously researched and vivid retelling brings to life this key episode in one of the world's longest lasting and most damaging conflicts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780747599487 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xi, 237 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Acknowledgments 1. Introduction: Palestine's Conflictual Modernity 2. The Mountain against the Sea? Cultural Wars of the Eastern Mediterranean 3. From Emma Bovary to Hasan al-Banna: Small Towns and Social Control 4. Bourgeois Nostalgia and the Abandoned City 5. A Musician's Lot: The Jawhariyyeh Memoirs as a Key to Jerusalem's Early Modernity 6. Lepers, Lunatics, and Saints: The Nativist Ethnography of Tawfiq Canaan and His Circle 7. Sultana and Khalil: The Origins of Romantic Love in Palestine 8. The Last Feudal Lord 9. Ishaq Shami and the Predicament of the Arab Jew in Palestine 10. The Enigmatic Bolshevik from the Holy City 11. The Vagabond Cafe and Jerusalem's Prince of Idleness Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520251298 20160528
This groundbreaking book on modern Palestinian culture goes beyond the usual focal point of the 1948 war to address the earlier, formative years. Drawing on previously unavailable biographies of Palestinians (including Palestinian Jews), Salim Tamari offers eleven vignettes of Palestine's cultural life in the momentous first half of the twentieth century. He brings to light the memoirs, diaries, letters, and other writings of six Jerusalem intellectuals whose lives spanned (and defined) the period of 1918-1948: a musician, a teacher, a former aristocrat, a doctor, a Bolshevik revolutionary, and a Jewish novelist. These essays present an integrated cultural history that illuminates a watershed in the modern social history of the Arab East, the formulation of the Arab Enlightenment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520251298 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
285 p. : maps.
eReserve
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xxiv, 285 p. : maps. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface to the second edition-- Introduction-- 1. The Palestinians and 1948: the underlying causes of failure Rashid Khaldi-- 2. Revisiting the Palestinian exodus of 1948 Benny Morris-- 3. The Druze and the birth of Israel Laila Parsons-- 4. Israel and the Arab coalition in 1948 Avi Shlaim-- 5. Jordan and 1948: the persistence of an official history Eugene L. Rogan-- 6. Iraq and the 1948 war: mirror of Iraq's disorder Charles Tripp-- 7. Egypt and the 1948 war: internal conflict and regional ambition Fawaz A. Gerges-- 8. Syria and the Palestine War: fighting King 'Abdullah's 'Greater Syria Plan' Joshua Landis-- 9. Collusion across the Litani? Lebanon and the 1948 war Matthew Hughes-- 10. Saudi Arabia and the 1948 Palestine War: beyond official history Madawi Al-Rasheed-- 11. Afterword: the consequences of 1948 Edward W. Said.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521875981 20160528
The 1948 war led to the creation of the state of Israel, the fragmentation of Palestine, and to a conflict which has raged across the intervening sixty years. The historical debate likewise continues and these debates are encapsulated in the second edition of The War for Palestine, updated to include chapters on Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. In a preface to the new edition, the editors survey the state of scholarship in this contested field. The impact of these debates goes well beyond academia. There is an important link between the state of Arab-Israeli relations and popular attitudes towards the past. A more complex and fair-minded understanding of that past is essential for preserving at least the prospect of reconciliation between Arabs and Israel in the future. The rewriting of the history of 1948 thus remains a practical as well as an academic imperative.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521875981 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xvii, 454 p. : map ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xlii, 281 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: Writing Middle Eastern history in a time of historical amnesia
  • 1. Arab society in Mandatory Palestine
  • 2. The Palestinians and the British mandate
  • 3. A failure of leadership
  • 4. The revolt, 1948, and afterward
  • 5. Fateh, the PLO, and the PA: the Palestinian para-state
  • 6. Stateless in Palestine
  • Notes
  • Index.
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xvi, 309 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Contrasting Narratives of Palestinian Identity Cultural Life and Identity in Late Ottoman Palestine: The Place of Jerusalem Competing and Overlapping Loyalties in Ottoman Jerusalem Elements of Identity I: Peasant Resistance to Zionist Settlement Elements of Identity II: The Debate on Zionism in the Arabic Press The Formation of Palestinian Identity: The Critical Years, 1917-1923 The "Disappearance" and Reemergence of Palestinian Identity.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231105149 20160528
Since the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948, Palestinians have spread out across the region - in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, as well as the occupied territories of Israel itself. Beginning with World War I, and across the geographical borders of their diaspora, this volume explores the evolution of a Palestinian national identity that developed in spite of, and in some cases because of, the obstacles it faced. It illuminates the sources of collective Palestinian identity from the late Ottoman Empire onward: religious beliefs; ethnic backgrounds; local loyalties; education; and external forces such as Zionism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231105149 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01
Book
xvi, 440 p. : map ; 24 cm.
This work explores the mutually formative interactions between the Arab and Jewish working classes, labour movements and worker-oriented political parties in Palestine just before and during the period of British colonial rule.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520204195 20160528
In "Comrades and Enemies" Zachary Lockman explores the mutually formative interactions between the Arab and Jewish working classes, labour movements, and worker-oriented political parties in Palestine just before and during the period of British colonial rule. Unlike most of the historical and sociological literature on Palestine in this period, "Comrades and Enemies" avoids treating the Arab and Jewish communities as if they developed independently of each other. Instead of focusing on politics, diplomacy, or military history, Lockman draws on detailed archival research in both Arabic and Hebrew, and on interviews with activists, to delve into the country's social, economic, and cultural history, showing how Arab and Jewish societies in Palestine helped to shape each other in significant ways. "Comrades and Enemies" presents a narrative of Arab-Jewish relations in Palestine that extends and complicates the conventional story of primordial identities, total separation, and unremitting conflict while going beyond both Zionist and Palestinian nationalist mythologies and paradigms of interpretation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520202597 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-288-01, HISTORY-388-01, JEWISHST-288-01, JEWISHST-388-01