%{search_type} search results

23 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xxxv, 256 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. Locating Boccaccio: 1. Boccaccio as cultural mediator Guyda Armstrong, Rhiannon Daniels and Stephen J. Milner-- 2. Boccaccio and his desk Beatrice Arduini-- 3. Boccaccio's narrators and audiences Rhiannon Daniels-- Part II. Literary Forms and Narrative Voices: 4. The Decameron and narrative form Pier Massimo Forni-- 5. The Decameron and Boccaccio's poetics David Lummus-- 6. Boccaccio's Decameron and the semiotics of the everyday Stephen J. Milner-- 7. Voicing gender in the Decameron F. Regina Psaki-- Part III. Boccaccop's Literary Contexts: 8. Boccaccio and Dante Guyda Armstrong-- 9. Boccaccio and Petrarch Gur Zak-- 10. Boccaccio and humanism Tobias Gittes-- 11. Boccaccio and women Marilyn Migiel-- Part IV. Transmission and Adaptation: 12. Editing Boccaccio Brian Richardson-- 13. Translating Boccaccio Cormac O Cuilleanain-- 14. Boccaccio beyond the text Massimo Riva-- Guide to further reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107609631 20160618
Incorporating the most recent research by scholars in Italy, the UK, Ireland and North America, this collection of essays foregrounds Boccaccio's significance as a pre-eminent scholar and mediator of the classical and vernacular traditions, whose innovative textual practices confirm him as a figure of equal standing to Petrarch and Dante. Situating Boccaccio and his works in their cultural contexts, the Companion introduces a wide range of his texts, paying close attention to his formal innovations, elaborate voicing strategies, and the tensions deriving from his position as a medieval author who places women at the centre of his work. Four chapters are dedicated to different aspects of his masterpiece, the Decameron, while particular attention is paid to the material forms of his works: from his own textual strategies as the shaper of his own and others' literary legacies, to his subsequent editorial history, and translation into other languages and media.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107609631 20160618
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
x, 248 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Introduction "Fateci dipingere la Cortesia": Historicizing Cortesia Chapter One Boccaccio's History of Cortesia: The Incivility and Greed of Elite Families * Cortesia and the Florentine Elite from the Early Commune to the Age of Dante * The Dantean cornice of Inf. 16 and "cortesia" lost: Decameron 1.8, 6.9 and Esposizioni 16 * The Greed of the Genoese (but not Florentine) Elite: Decameron 1.8, Guiglielmo Borsiere, and Ermino Grimaldi * The Incivility of Cortesia: Decameron 6.9, Betto Brunelleschi and Guido Cavalcanti Chapter Two The Politics of Cortesia: Historicizing the Elite and the gente nuova * Florentine Politics and Economics from Dante to Boccaccio: The Older Elite Families and the gente nuova * From Dantean Prophecy to Boccaccian Enactment: Florence from 1300-1302 * Figuring Florentine Conflict: Corso Donati (cortesia) versus Vieri de' Cerchi (avarizia) * The Elite and the popolo: The Case of Cisti and Geri Spini * The Arno Runs Red: Narrating Florentine Violence Chapter Three The Ethical (and Dantean) Framework of the Decameron: The Avarice of Clerics and Merchants * Cangrande della Scala: Dante's Generous Host Experiences an Unusual, and Momentary, Affliction of Avarice * Pope Boniface VIII: Figuring Avarice at the Beginning and End of the Decameron * A Tempered "epopea dei mercatanti": Musciatto Franzesi and the Avarice of the Merchant Class * The Dantean cornice of Avarice: Esposizioni 1 and Decameron 10.3 * From Finance to Fowling: The Case of the Gianfigliazzi Family Chapter Four Constructing a Future for Cortesia in the Past: Virility, Nobility, and the History of the Guelphs and the Ghibellines * The Familial Court of Cortesia: The Civil Acts of the Malaspina Family * Cortesia Was Chaste: The Virility of the Guelphs and the Ghibellines * Virility as Nobility: Cortesia in Romagna Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442647077 20160617
In Courtesy Lost, Kristina M. Olson analyses the literary impact of the social, political, and economic transformations of the fourteenth century through an exploration of Dante's literary and political influence on Boccaccio. The book reveals how Boccaccio rewrote the past through the lens of the Commedia, torn between nostalgia for elite families in decline and the need to promote morality and magnanimity within the Florentine Republic. By examining the passages in Boccaccio's Decameron, De casibus, and Esposizioni in which the author rewrites moments in Florentine and Italian history that had also appeared in Dante's Commedia, Olson illuminates the ways in which Boccaccio expressed his deep ambivalence towards the political and social changes of his era. She illustrates this through an analysis of Dante's and Boccaccio's treatments of the idea of courtesy, or cortesia, in an era when the chivalry of the declining aristocracy was being supplanted by the civility of the rising merchant classes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442647077 20160617
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
viii, 268 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction - Pier Massimo Forni and Francesco Ciabattoni The Tale of Masetto da Lamporecchio (III.1) - Massimo Ciavolella The Tale of the King and the Groom (III.2) - Elsa Filosa The Tale of the Gentlewoman, the Gallant Man and the Friar (III.3) - Stefano Gulizia The Tale of Fra Puccio (III.4) - Jelena Todorovic The Tale of Zima (III.5) - Alessandro Vettori The Tale of Ricciardo and Catella (III.6) - Myriam Swennen Ruthenberg The Tale of Tedaldo degli Elisei (III.7) - Susanna Barsella The Tale of Ferondo's Purgatory (III. 8) - Martin Eisner The Tale of Giletta di Narbona (III.9) - Anthony Cassell The Tale of Alibech (III.10) - Steven Grossvogel.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442648241 20160613
Divided into ten days of ten novellas each, Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron is one of the literary gems of the fourteenth century. The 'Decameron' Third Day in Perspective is an interpretive guide to the stories of the text's Third Day. For each novella, a distinguished Boccaccio scholar offers an essay that both reviews the current scholarly literature and advances new and intriguing interpretations of the work. The whole collection reflects the series's guiding principle of examining the text "in perspective, " revealing the connections among the novellas, the Days, and the framing narrative that holds the whole Decameron together. The second of the University of Toronto Press's interpretive guides to Boccaccio's Decameron, this collection forms part of an ambitious project to examine the entire Decameron, Day by Day.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442648241 20160613
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
xix, 555 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Chronology of Boccaccio's life and works / Victoria Kirkham
  • Introduction: a man of many turns / Janet Levarie Smarr
  • The vernacular master. Also known as "Prencipe Galeotto" (Decameron) / Ronald L. Martinez ; The textual history of the Decameron / Brian Richardson
  • The autodidact. Moments of Latin poetry (Carmina) / Giuseppe Velli ; A fable of the world's creation and Phaeton's fall (Allegoria mitologica) / Steven M. Grossvogel ; A portrait of a young humanist (Epistolae 1-4) / Jason Houston
  • Classical romances. Love-struck in Naples (Filostrato) / David Wallace ; A lovers' tale and auspicious beginning (Filocolo) / Elissa Weaver ; The girl outside the window (Teseida delle nozze d'Emilia) / Michael Sherberg
  • Allegorical terza rima. The game of love (Caccia di Diana) / Arielle Saiber ; Mural morality in Tableaux vivants (Aamorosa visione) / Jonathan Usher
  • New pastorals. On the threshold of paradise (Comedia delle ninfe fiorentine, or Ameto) / Jane Tylus ; Myth and history: toward a new order (Ninfale fiesolano) / Susanna Barsella ; The changing landscape of the self (Buccolicum carmen) / David Lummus
  • Woman and women. An experiment in the healing power of literature (Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta) / Annelise M. Brody ; Rhetoric and invective in love's labyrinth (Il corbaccio) / Letizia Panizza ; Doing and undoing: Boccaccio's feminism (De mulieribus claris) / Deanna Shemek
  • Devotion to Dante and Petrarch. A life in progress (De vita et moribus Francisci Petracchi de Florentia) / Giuseppe Mazzotta
  • To praise Dante, to please Petrarch (Trattatello in laude di Dante) / Elsa Filosa ; Boccaccio's divided allegiance (Esposizioni sopra la "comedia") / Robert Hollander
  • Historian and humanist. Gods, greeks, and poetry (Genealogia deorum gentilium) / Jon Solomon ; Boccaccio on fortune (De casibus virorum illustrium) / Simone Marchesi -;Vernacularization in context (Volgarizzamenti of Livy, Valerius Maximus, and Ovid) / Alison Cornish
  • Geographical explorations. Boccaccio's humanistic ethnography (De canaria) / James L. Coleman ; Between text and territory (De montibus, silvis, fontibus, lacubus, fluminibus, stagnis - Seu paludibus et de diversis nominibus maris) / Theodore J. Cachey Jr
  • Miscellanies: lyrics, letters, notebooks. Pathways through the lyric forest (Rime) / Roberto Fedi ; Personality and conflict (Epistole, lettere) / Todd Boli ; Boccaccio's working notebooks (Zibaldone laurenziano, miscellanea laurenziana - Zibaldone magliabechiano) / Claude Cazalé-Bérard
  • Epilogue
  • A visual legacy (Boccaccio as artist) / Victoria kirkham
  • An intimate self-portrait (Testamentum) / Michael Papio.
Long celebrated as one of "the Three Crowns" of Florence, Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-75) experimented widely with the forms of literature. His prolific and innovative writings - which range beyond the novella, from lyric to epic, from biography to mythography and geography, from pastoral and romance to invective - became powerful models for authors in Italy and across the Continent. This collection of essays presents Boccaccio's life and creative output in its encyclopedic diversity. Exploring a variety of genres, Latin as well as Italian, it provides short descriptions of all his works, situates them in his oeuvre, and features critical expositions of their most salient features and innovations. Designed for readers at all levels, it will appeal to scholars of literature, medieval and Renaissance studies, humanism and the classical tradition, as well as European historians, art historians, and students of material culture and the history of the book. Anchored by an introduction and chronology, this volume contains contributions by prominent Boccaccio scholars in the United States, as well as essays by contributors from France, Italy, and the United Kingdom. The year 2013, Boccaccio's seven-hundredth birthday, will be an important one for the study of his work and will see an increase in academic interest in reassessing his legacy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226079189 20160612
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
xiv, 243 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Boccaccio between Dante and Petrarch: cultivating vernacular literary community in the Chigi codex-- 1. Dante's dirty feet and the limping republic: Boccaccio's defense of literature in the Vita di Dante-- 2. Dante's shame and Boccaccio's paratextual praise: editing the Vita nuova, Commedia, and canzoni distese-- 3. The making of Petrarch's vernacular Book of Fragments (Fragmentorum liber)-- 4. The inventive scribe: glossing Cavalcanti in the Chigi and Decameron 6.9-- Epilogue: the allegory of the vernacular: Boccaccio's Esposizioni and Petrarch's Griselda.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107041660 20160612
Giovanni Boccaccio played a pivotal role in the extraordinary emergence of the Italian literary tradition in the fourteenth century, not only as author of the Decameron, but also as scribe of Dante, Petrarch and Cavalcanti. Using a single codex written entirely in Boccaccio's hand, Martin Eisner brings together material philology and literary history to reveal the multiple ways Boccaccio authorizes this vernacular literary tradition. Each chapter offers a novel interpretation of Boccaccio as a biographer, storyteller, editor and scribe, who constructs arguments, composes narratives, compiles texts and manipulates material forms to legitimize and advance a vernacular literary canon. Situating these philological activities in the context of Boccaccio's broader reflections on poetry in the Decameron and the Genealogy of the Gentile Gods, the book produces a new portrait of Boccaccio that integrates his vernacular and Latin works, while also providing a new context for understanding his fictions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107041660 20160612
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
x, 369 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
273 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
viii, 270 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • The Decameron proem / Robert Hollander
  • The place of the title (Decameron, day one, introduction) / Thomas C. Stillinger
  • The tale of Ser Ciappelletto (I.1) / Franco Fido
  • The tale of Abraham the Jew (I.2) / Marga Cottino-Jones
  • The tale of the three rings (I.3) / Pamela D. Stewart
  • The tale of the monk and his abbot (I.4) / Ronald Martinez
  • The tale of the marchioness of Monferrato (I.5) / Dante Della Terza
  • The tale of the inquisitor (I.6) / Janet Levarie Smarr
  • The tale of Bergamino (I.7) / Michelangelo Picone
  • The tale of Guigliemo Borsiere (I.8) / Victoria Kirkham
  • The tale of the king of Cyprus and the lady of Gascony (I.9) / Pier Massimo Forni
  • The tale of Maestro Alberto (I.10) / Millicent Marcus.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
xxii, 152 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
xi, 219 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
250 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
555 p.
  • Introduction-- 1. Chaucer in Florence and Lombardy-- 2. The General Prologue and the anatomy of associational form-- 3. 'From every shires Ende': English guides and Chaucer's Compagnye-- 4. 'No falaweshipe': thesian polity-- 5. Powers of the countryside-- 6. Absent city-- 7. 'Deyntee to Chaffare': men of law, merchants, and the constance story-- 8. Household rhetoric: violence and eloquence in the Tale of Melibee-- 9. After eloquence: Chaucer in the house of Apollo-- 10. 'Whan she translated was': humanism, tyranny, and the Petrarchan academy-- 11. All that fall: Chaucer's monk and 'every myghty man'-- 12. 'If that thou live': legends and lives of good women-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804736619 20160528
Chaucer's encounters with the great Trecento authors Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch facilitate the testing and dismantling of time-honored terms such as medieval, Renaissance, and humanism. The author argues that no magic curtain separated medieval London and Westminster from Renaissance Florence and Milan; as a result of his Italian journeys, all sites were interlinked for Chaucer as parts of a transnational nexus of capital, cultural, mercantile, and military exchange. In his travels, Chaucer was exposed to the Trecento's most crucial material and ideological conflict, that between a fully developed and highly inclusive associational polity (Florence) and the first, prototypically imperfect, absolutist state of modern times (Lombardy). Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the author proposes, explores both the establishment and maintenance of generously inclusive associational forms (the pilgrim compagnye) and the dangers of despotism (most famously exemplified by tyraunts of Lombardye). The Tales thus speaks to political tensions experienced in Ricardian, or fourteenth-century, England that find resolution only in the sixteenth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804736619 20160528
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
283 p., 15 p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
117 p.
  • Acknowledgments-- Chronology-- Part I. The Making of the Decameron: 1. The Decameron as a landmark of world literature-- 2. Boccaccio, Naples and Florence before the Decameron-- Part II. The Decameron: 3. Title and preface-- 4. First Day (Introduction)-- (i) the plague-- (ii) the mise-en-scene-- 5. First Day: the saint's life and the powers of language-- 6. Second Day: fortune, female character and the impulse to trade-- 7. Third Day: sex, voice and morals-- 8. Fourth Day (introduction): Boccaccio's apology for Florentine prose-- 9. Fourth Day: love and feudal aristocracy-- 10. Fifth Day: romance, class difference, social negotiation-- 11. Sixth Day: Florentine society and associational form-- 12. Seventh Day: controlling domestic space-- 13. Eighth Day: the scholar and the widow-- 14. Ninth Day: the mystery of Calandrino-- 15. Tenth Day: magnificance and myths of power-- 16. The return to Florence and the author's conclusion-- Part III. After the Decameron: Guide to further reading.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521381826 20160528
In Boccaccio's innovative text, ten young people leave Florence to escape the Black Death of 1348, and organize their collective life in the countryside through the pleasure and discipline of story-telling. David Wallace guides the reader through their one hundred novelle, which explore both new and familiar conflicts from private and public spheres of life with unprecedented subtlety, urgency and humour. He emphasises the relationship between Decameron and the precocious vitality of Florentine culture in Boccaccio's time. He also discusses gender issues and the influence of the text particularly on Chaucer and the novel.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521381826 20160528
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
284 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
xvi, 280 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
ix, 230 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01

18. Boccaccio [1981]

Book
viii, 392 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
vi, 136 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01
Book
xx, 246 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
ITALIAN-152-01, ITALIAN-352-01