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Book
xiii, 381 pages ; 26 cm
  • Preface 1. Intelligence Analysis: What Is It -- and What Does It Take? James B. Bruce and Roger Z. George Part I: The Analytic Tradition 2. The Evolution of Intelligence Analysis in the US Intelligence Community John H. Hedley 3. The Track Record of CIA Analysis Richard J. Kerr and Michael Warner 4. Is Intelligence Analysis a Discipline? Rebecca Fisher, Rob Johnston, and Peter Clement Part II: The Policymaker--Analyst Relationship 5. Serving the National Policymaker John McLaughlin 6. The Policymaker's Perspective: Transparency and Partnership James B. Steinberg 7. Serving the Senior Military Consumer: A National Agency Perspective John Kringen Part III: Diagnosis and Prescription 8. Why Bad Things Happen to Good Analysts Jack Davis 9. Making Intelligence Analysis More Reliable: Why Epistemology Matters to Intelligence James B. Bruce 10. The Missing Link: The Analyst--Collector Relationship James B. Bruce Part IV: Enduring Challenges 11. The Art of Intelligence and Strategy Roger Z. George 12. Foreign Deception and Denial: Analytic Imperatives James B. Bruce and Michael Bennett 13. Warning in an Age of Uncertainty Roger Z. George and James J. Wirtz Part V: Analysis for Twenty-First-Century Issues 14. Structured Analytic Techniques: A New Approach to Analysis Randolph H. Pherson and Richards J. Heuer Jr. 15. New Analytic Techniques for Tactical Military Intelligence Vincent Stewart, Drew E. Cukor, Joseph Larson III, and Matthew Pottinger 16. Domestic Intelligence Analysis Maureen Baginski Part VI: Leading Analytic Change 17. Building a Community of Analysts Thomas Fingar 18. The Education and Training of Intelligence Analysts Mark M. Lowenthal 19. Analytic Outreach: Pathway to Expertise Building and Professionalization Susan H. Nelson 20. Conclusion: Professionalizing Intelligence Analysis in the Twenty-First Century Roger Z. George and James B. Bruce Glossary Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781626160255 20160616
Analyzing Intelligence, now in a revised and extensively updated second edition, assesses the state of the profession of intelligence analysis from the practitioners point of view. The contributors -- most of whom have held senior positions in the US intelligence community -- review the evolution of the field, the rise of new challenges, pitfalls in analysis, and the lessons from new training and techniques designed to deal with 21st century national security problems. This second edition updates this indispensable book with new chapters that highlight advances in applying more analytic rigor to analysis, along with expertise-building, training, and professional development. New chapters by practitioners broaden the original volume's discussion of the analyst-policymaker relationship by addressing analytic support to the military customer as well as by demonstrating how structured analysis can benefit military commanders on the battlefield. Analyzing Intelligence is written for national security practitioners such as producers and users of intelligence, as well as for scholars and students seeking to understand the nature and role of intelligence analysis, its strengths and weaknesses, and steps that can improve it and lead it to a more recognizable profession. The most comprehensive and up-to-date volume on professional intelligence analysis as practiced in the US Government, Analyzing Intelligence is essential reading for practitioners and users of intelligence analysis, as well as for students and scholars in security studies and related fields.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781626160255 20160616
Green Library
IPS-219-01
Book
xv, 248 pages ; 23 cm
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix Note on Redactions xiii 1 Birth of an Enigma: 1945 1949 1 2 Halcyon Days and Growing Pains: 1950 1961 35 3 The CIA and its Discontents: 1961 1976 70 4 A Time of Troubles: 1977 1987 108 5 Victory Without Redemption: 1988 2000 138 6 9/11, WMD, GWOT, IRTPA, and ODNI: 2001 2004 172 7 Crisis of Identity: 2005 2013 206 Index 235.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781444351378 20160613
The Hidden Hand is a succinct accessible and up-to-datesurvey of the Central Intelligence Agency s history from itsinception in 1947 to the present. * Covers both aspects of the CIA s mission thecollection and analysis of intelligence and the execution offoreign policy through covert, paramilitary operations * De-mythologizes the CIA s role in America s globalaffairs while addressing its place within American political andpopular culture * Written by an esteemed scholar and high-ranking officer in theintelligence community, drawing on the latest research * Assesses the agency s successes and failures, with an eyeto the complex and controversial nature of the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781444351378 20160613
Green Library
IPS-219-01
Book
xxi, 250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
After the September 11 attacks, the 9/11 Commission argued that the United States needed a powerful leader, a spymaster, to forge the scattered intelligence bureaucracies into a singular enterprise to vanquish America's new enemies - stateless international terrorists. In the midst of the 2004 presidential election, Congress and the president remade the post - World War II national security infrastructure in less than five months, creating the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) and a National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC). Blinking Red illuminates the complicated history of the bureaucratic efforts to reform America's national security after the intelligence failures of 9/11 and Iraq's missing weapons of mass destruction, explaining how the NSC and Congress shaped the U.S. response to the 9/11 attacks. Michael Allen asserts that the process of creating the DNI position and the NCTC is a case study in power politics and institutional reform. By bringing to light the legislative transactions and political wrangling during the reform of the intelligence community, Allen helps us understand why the effectiveness of these institutional changes is still in question.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781612346151 20160612
Green Library
IPS-219-01
Book
xxi, 417 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • What Is "Intelligence"? The Development of U.S. Intelligence The U.S. Intelligence Community The Intelligence Process-A Macro Look: Who Does What For Whom? Collection and the Collection Disciplines Analysis Counterintelligence Covert Action The Role of the Policy Maker Oversight and Accountability The Intelligence Agenda: Nation States The Intelligence Agenda: Transnational Issue Ethical and Moral Issues in Intelligence Intelligence Reform Foreign Intelligence Services.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781608716753 20160607
"Intelligence" veteran Mark M. Lowenthal details how the intelligence community's history, structure, procedures, and functions affect policy decisions. With straightforward and friendly prose, the book demystifies a complex process. The fifth edition highlights crucial developments and new challenges in the intelligence community, including: changes in the management of U.S. intelligence and the fourth DNI in five years; obama administration policies; developments in collection and analysis; the killing of bin Laden, Wikileaks, and updates on Russia, North Korea, China, and the Middle East; the ability to handle the shift from large-scale attacks to smaller, individual attempts; and expanded coverage of foreign intelligence services and new coverage of intelligence in authoritarian regimes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781608716753 20160607
Green Library
IPS-219-01
Book
xv, 367 p. : ill., map ; 26 cm.
  • Foreword Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, USAF (Ret.)Preface Introduction: The National Security Enterprise: Institutions, Cultures and Politics Roger Z. George and Harvey RishikofPart I: The Interagency Process1. History of the Interagency Process for Foreign Relations in the United States: Murphy's Law? Jon J. Rosenwasser and Michael Warner2. The Evolution of the NSC Process David Auerswald3. The Office of Management and Budget: The President's Policy Tool Gordon Adams4. The State Department: Culture as Interagency Destiny? Marc Grossman5. The Office of the Secretary of Defense: Civilian Masters? Frederick C. Smith and Franklin C. Miller6. The Military: Forging a Joint Warrior Culture Michael J. Meese and Isaiah Wilson III7. Office of the Director of National Intelligence: Promising Start Despite Ambiguity, Ambivalence, and Animosity Thomas Fingar8. Central Intelligence Agency: The President's Own Roger Z. George9. The Evolving FBI: Becoming a New National Security Enterprise Asset Harvey Rishikof10. The Department of Homeland Security: Chief of Coordination Gary M. Shiffman and Jonathan HoffmanPart II: The President's Partners and Rivals11. Congress: Checking Presidential Power Gerald Felix Warburg12. The United States Supreme Court: The Cult of the Robe in the National Security Enterprise Harvey RishikofPart III: The Outside Players 13. Lobbyists: U.S. National Security and Special Interests Gerald Felix Warburg 14. Think Tanks: Supporting Cast Players in the National Security Enterprise Ellen Laipson15. The Media: Witness to the National Security Enterprise John Diamond Conclusion: Navigating the Labyrinth of the National Security Enterprise Harvey Rishikof and Roger Z. George Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781589016989 20160605
Recent breakdowns in American national security have exposed the weaknesses of the nation's vast overlapping security and foreign policy bureaucracy and the often dysfunctional interagency process. In the literature of national security studies, however, surprisingly little attention is given to the specific dynamics or underlying organizational cultures that often drive the bureaucratic politics of U.S. security policy. "The National Security Enterprise" offers a broad overview and analysis of the many government agencies involved in national security issues, the interagency process, Congressional checks and balances, and the influence of private sector organizations. The chapters cover the National Security Council, the Departments of Defense and State, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Office of Management and Budget. The book also focuses on the roles of Congress, the Supreme Court, and outside players in the national security process like the media, think tanks, and lobbyists. Each chapter details the organizational culture and personality of these institutions so that readers can better understand the mindsets that drive these organizations and their roles in the policy process. Many of the contributors to this volume are long-time practitioners who have spent most of their careers working for these organizations. As such, they offer unique insights into how diplomats, military officers, civilian analysts, spies, and law enforcement officials are distinct breeds of policymakers and political actors. To illustrate how different agencies can behave in the face of a common challenge, contributors reflect in detail on their respective agency's behavior during the Iraq War. This impressive volume is suitable for academic studies at both the undergraduate and graduate level; ideal for U.S. government, military, and national security training programs; and useful for practitioners and specialists in national security studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781589016989 20160605
Green Library, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
IPS-219-01
Book
xii, 176 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Reducing uncertainty
  • Myths, fears, and expectations
  • Spies collect data, analysts provide insight
  • Using intelligence to anticipate and shape the future
  • Estimative analysis : what it is, what it isn't, and how to read it
  • A tale of two estimates
  • Epilogue : lessons and challenges.
The US government spends billions of dollars every year to reduce uncertainty: to monitor and forecast everything from the weather to the spread of disease. In other words, we spend a lot of money to anticipate problems, identify opportunities, and avoid mistakes. A substantial portion of what we spend - over $50 billion a year - goes to the US Intelligence Community. Reducing Uncertainty describes what Intelligence Community analysts do, how they do it, and how they are affected by the political context that shapes, uses, and sometimes abuses their output. In particular, it looks at why IC analysts pay more attention to threats than to opportunities, and why they appear to focus more on warning about the possibility of "bad things" happening than on providing the input necessary for increasing the likelihood of positive outcomes. The book is intended to increase public understanding of what IC analysts do, to elicit more relevant and constructive suggestions for improvement from outside the Intelligence Community, to stimulate innovation and collaboration among analysts at all grade levels in all agencies, and to provide a core resource for students of intelligence. The most valuable aspect of this book is the in-depth discussion of National Intelligence Estimates - what they are, what it means to say that they represent the "most authoritative judgments of the Intelligence Community, " why and how they are important, and why they have such high political salience and symbolic importance. The final chapter lays out, from an insider's perspective, the story of the flawed Iraq WMD NIE and its impact on the subsequent Iran nuclear NIE - paying particular attention to the heightened political scrutiny the latter received in Congress following the Iraq NIE debacle.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804775946 20160605
Green Library
IPS-219-01
Book
xvi, 241 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface 1. Twenty-first-Century Intelligence: New Enemies and Old 2. Permanent Enemies: Why Intelligence Failures Are Inevitable 3. Theory Traps: Expertise as an Enemy 4. Incorruptibility or Influence? Costs and Benefits of Politicization 5. Two Faces of Failure: September 11 and Iraq's WMD 6. An Intelligence Reformation? Two Faces of Reorganization 7. Whose Knowledge of Whom? The Conflict of Secrets 8. Enemies at Bay: Successful Intelligence Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231138888 20160528
The tragic events of September 11, 2001, and the false assessment of Saddam Hussein's weapons arsenal were terrible reminders that good information is essential to national security. These failures convinced the American public that their intelligence system was broken and prompted a radical reorganization of agencies and personnel, but as Richard K. Betts argues in this book, critics and politicians have severely underestimated the obstacles to true reform. One of the nation's foremost political scientists, Betts draws on three decades of work within the U.S. intelligence community to illuminate the paradoxes and problems that frustrate the intelligence process. Unlike America's efforts to improve its defenses against natural disasters, strengthening its strategic assessment capabilities means outwitting crafty enemies who operate beyond U.S. borders. It also requires looking within to the organizational and political dynamics of collecting information and determining its implications for policy. Combining academic research with personal experience, Betts outlines strategies for better intelligence gathering and assessment. He describes how fixing one malfunction can create another; in what ways expertise can be both a vital tool and a source of error and misjudgment; the pitfalls of always striving for accuracy in intelligence, which in some cases can render it worthless; the danger, though unavoidable, of "politicizing" intelligence; and the issue of secrecy& mdash; when it is excessive, when it is insufficient, and how limiting privacy can in fact protect civil liberties. Betts argues that when it comes to intelligence, citizens and politicians should focus less onconsistent solutions and more on achieving a delicate balance between conflicting requirements. He also emphasizes the substantial success of the intelligence community, despite its well-publicized blunders, and highlights elements of the intelligence process that need preservation and protection. Many reformers are quick to respond to scandals and failures without detailed, historical knowledge of how the system works. Grounding his arguments in extensive theory and policy analysis, Betts takes a comprehensive and realistic look at how knowledge and power can work together to face the intelligence challenges of the twenty-first century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231511131 20160527
Green Library
IPS-219-01