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Book
viii, 658 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The state
  • Foreign institutions
  • Democracy
  • Political decay.
"The second volume of the bestselling landmark work on the history of the modern state Writing in The Wall Street Journal, David Gress called Francis Fukuyama's Origins of Political Order "magisterial in its learning and admirably immodest in its ambition." In The New York Times Book Review, Michael Lind described the book as "a major achievement by one of the leading public intellectuals of our time." And in The Washington Post, Gerard DeGrott exclaimed "this is a book that will be remembered. Bring on volume two." Volume two is finally here, completing the most important work of political thought in at least a generation. Taking up the essential question of how societies develop strong, impersonal, and accountable political institutions, Fukuyama follows the story from the French Revolution to the so-called Arab Spring and the deep dysfunctions of contemporary American politics. He examines the effects of corruption on governance, and why some societies have been successful at rooting it out. He explores the different legacies of colonialism in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, and offers a clear-eyed account of why some regions have thrived and developed more quickly than others. And he boldly reckons with the future of democracy in the face of a rising global middle class and entrenched political paralysis in the West. A sweeping, masterful account of the struggle to create a well-functioning modern state, Political Order and Political Decay is destined to be a classic"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
INTLPOL-230-01, INTNLREL-114D-01, POLISCI-114D-01, POLISCI-314D-01
Book
xiv, 585 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Francis Fukuyama examines the paths that different societies have taken to reach their current forms of political order.
Green Library
INTLPOL-230-01, INTNLREL-114D-01, POLISCI-114D-01, POLISCI-314D-01
Book
xxvi, 245 p. ; 24 cm.
The newest volume in the acclaimed "Journal of Democracy" series addresses electoral systems and democracy. As the number of democracies has increased around the world, a heated debate has emerged among political scientists about which system best promotes the consolidation of democracy. Is proportional representation, a majoritarian system, a mixture of the two, or some other system the best for new democracies? This book compares the experiences of diverse countries, from Latin America to southern Africa, from Uruguay, Japan, and Taiwan to Israel, Afghanistan, and Iraq.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801884740 20160528
Green Library
INTLPOL-230-01, INTNLREL-114D-01, POLISCI-114D-01, POLISCI-314D-01