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Book
361 pages : chiefly illustrations ; 24 cm
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01
Book
307 pages ; 22 cm
"A dazzling debut novel about a Russian immigrant family living in Brooklyn and their struggle to learn the new rules of the American Dream. In this account of two decades in the life of an immigrant household, the fall of communism and the rise of globalization are artfully reflected in the experience of a single family. Ironies, subtle and glaring, are revealed: the Nasmertovs left Odessa for Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, with a huge sense of finality, only to find that the divide between the old world and the new is not nearly as clear-cut as they thought. The dissolution of the Soviet Union makes returning just a matter of a plane ticket, and the Russian-owned shops in their adopted neighborhood stock even the most obscure comforts of home. Pursuing the American Dream once meant giving up everything, but does the dream still work if the past is always within reach? If the Nasmertov parents can afford only to look forward, learning the rules of aspiration, the family's youngest, Frida, can only look back. In striking, arresting prose loaded with fresh and inventive turns of phrase, Yelena Akhtiorskaya has written the first great novel of Brighton Beach: a searing portrait of hope and ambition, and a profound exploration of the power and limits of language itself, its ability to make connections across cultures and generations"-- Provided by publisher.
"The story of an immigrant family living in Brooklyn's Little Odessa, and the obstinate uncle who resists his family's and their adopted country's promise of a superior life"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01
Book
321 pages ; 24 cm
"A singularly talented writer makes his literary debut with this provocative, soulful, and sometimes hilarious story of a failed journalist asked to do the unthinkable: Forge Holocaust-restitution claims for old Russian Jews in Brooklyn, New York. Yevgeny Gelman, grandfather of Slava Gelman, "didn't suffer in the exact way" he needs to have suffered to qualify for the restitution the German government has been paying out to Holocaust survivors. But suffer he has -- as a Jew in the war; as a second-class citizen in the USSR ; as an immigrant to America. So? Isn't his grandson a "writer"? High-minded Slava wants to put all this immigrant scraping behind him. Only the American Dream is not panning out for him -- Century, the legendary magazine where he works as a researcher, wants nothing greater from him. Slava wants to be a correct, blameless American -- but he wants to be a lionized writer even more. Slava's turn as the Forger of South Brooklyn teaches him that not every fact is the truth, and not every lie a falsehood. It takes more than law-abiding to become an American ; it takes the same self-reinvention in which his people excel. Intoxicated and unmoored by his inventions, Slava risks exposure. Cornered, he commits an irrevocable act that finally grants him a sense of home in America, but not before collecting a price from his family. A Replacement Life is a dark, moving, and beautifully written novel about family, honor, and justice"-- Provided by publisher.
"A humorous and heart-wrenching story of an aspiring twenty-something Russian-Jewish writer who struggles to reconcile his immigrant roots with his fragile new American identity"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01

4. The free world [2011]

Book
356 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01
Book
ix, 408 p. ; 24 cm.
Following the demise of communism in the early 1990s, more than 1.6 million Jews from the former Soviet Union emigrated to Israel, the United States, Canada, Germany, and other Western countries. Larissa Remmenick relates the saga of their encounter with the economic marketplaces, lifestyles, and everyday cultures of their new homelands, drawing on comparative sociological research among Russian-Jewish immigrants she conducted over the last decade. Although former Soviets of Jewish origin ostensibly left the former Soviet Union to flee persecution and join their co-religionists, Israeli, North American, and German Jews were universally disappointed by the new arrivals' tenuous Jewish identity and lack of interest in Jewish religious and community life. In turn, Russian Jews, whose identity had been shaped by seventy years of secular education and assimilation into the Soviet mainstream, hoped to be accepted on their own terms, as ambitious and hard working individuals seeking better lives. These divergent expectations shaped lines of conflict between Russian-speaking Jews and the Jewish communities of the receiving countries. Since her own immigration to Israel from Moscow in 1991, Remmenick has been both a participant and an observer of this saga, with optimal access to and cultural tools for the study of an ethnic diaspora. This is the first attempt to compare resettlement and integration experiences of a single ethnic community (former Soviet Jews) in various global destinations. It also analyzes their emerging transnational lifestyles, spanning three continents and embracing multiple domains of physical and virtual activities. Earlier studies of Soviet-Jewish experience have been narrow, focusing on Russian/Soviet Jewry in its homeland, on Jewish migrations during the twentieth century generally, or else describing the lives of the immigrants in one specific host country. Written from an interdisciplinary perspective, this book opens new perspectives for a diverse readership, including sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, historians, Slavic scholars, and Jewish studies specialists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780765803405 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01
Book
xiii, 297 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Table of Contents: Introduction 1. Creativity versus Repression: The Jews in Russia, 1881-1917 2. Revolution and the Ambiguities of Liberation 3. Reaching for Utopia: Building Socialism and a New Jewish Culture 4. The Holocaust 5. The Black Years and the Gray, 1948-1967 6. Soviet Jews, 1967-1987: To Reform, Conform, or Leave? 7. The "Other" Jews of the Former USSR: Georgian, Central Asian, and Mountain Jews 8. The Post-Soviet Era: Winding Down or Starting Up Again? 9. The Paradoxes of Post-Soviet Jewry.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253338112 20160528
A century ago the Russian Empire contained the largest Jewish community in the world, numbering about 5 million people. Today, the Jewish population of the former Soviet Union has dwindled to half a million, but remains probably the third largest Jewish community in the world. In the intervening century the Jews of that area have been at the centre of some of the most dramatic events of modern history - two world wars, revolutions, pogroms, political liberation, repression, and the collapse of the USSR. They have gone through dizzyingly rapid upward and downward economic and social mobility and experienced great enthusiasms and profound disappointments. In startling photographs and lively narrative, "A Century of Ambivalence" traces the historical experience of Jews in Russia from a period of creativity and repression in the second half of the nineteenth century through the paradoxes posed by the post-Soviet era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253338112 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01
Green Library
HISTORY-87S-01, JEWISHST-87S-01, REES-87S-01