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Book
201 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • On the trail of folk songs
  • Depression's beginnings and labor songs
  • The early Roosevelt years
  • Heart of the depression
  • Woody Guthrie emerges
  • The New Deal survives
  • Decade ends.
While music lovers and music historians alike understand that folkmusic played an increasingly pivotal role in American labor and politicsduring the economic and social tumult of the Great Depression, how did thisrelationship come to be? Ronald D. Cohen sheds new light on the complexcultural history of folk music in America, detailing the musicians, governmentagencies, and record companies that had a lasting impact during the1930s and beyond. Covering myriad musical styles and performers, Cohennarrates a singular history that begins in nineteenth-century labor politicsand popular music culture, following the rise of unions and Communismto the subsequent Red Scare and increasing power of the Conservativemovement in American politics-with American folk and vernacular musiccentered throughout. Detailing the influence and achievements of such notablemusicians as Pete Seeger, Big Bill Broonzy, and Woody Guthrie, Cohenexplores the intersections of politics, economics, and race, using the rootsof American folk music to explore one of the United States' most troubledtimes. Becoming entangled with the ascending American left wing, folkmusic became synonymous with protest and sharing the troubles of real peoplethrough song.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469630465 20161010
Green Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (116 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 audio disc ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; unknown; unknown. digital; optical; stereo. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; region 1. audio file; CD audio.
  • CD. I loves you Porgy
  • Don't let me be misunderstood
  • I put a spell on you
  • Strange fruit
  • Sinnerman
  • Mississippi Goddam
  • Little girl blue
  • Don't smoke in bed
  • My baby just cares for me
  • Lilac wine
  • Black is the color of my true love's hair
  • Night song
  • Nobody knows you when you're down and out
  • Feeling good
  • Ne me quitte pas.
Profiles the life and career of American singer Nina Simone.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-55N-01, AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (116 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 CD Sound: digital; optical. Digital: video file; Blu-Ray.
A documentary about the life and legend Nina Simone, an American singer, pianist, and civil rights activist labeled the High Priestess of Soul. This includes a bonus CD of her works which features the classics I Loves You Porgy; Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out; I Put a Spell on You; and many more.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01

4. We shall overcome [1989]

Video
1 videodisc (58 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; all regions.
Narrated by Harry Belafonte, provides a history of the song, We shall overcome, and its influence on the civil rights movement.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (73 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; stereo. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; all regions.
  • On top of old Smokey
  • Darling Corey
  • Allelujah
  • Guantanamera
  • Tomorrow lies in the cradle
  • Woody's rag
  • When the Saints go marching in
  • Goodnight Irene
  • Tzena, Tzena, Tzena
  • Miner's life
  • Venga Jaleo
  • Einstein theme song
  • Wasn't that a time
  • If I had a hammer
  • Victor Jara
  • Nobody knows you when you're down and out
  • Hay una mujer desaparecida
  • Banjo breakdown
  • Kisses sweeter than wine
  • Wimoweh (Mbube)
  • Get up and go
  • We wish you a merry Christmas.
Performances by the folksong group, the Weavers, with Arlo Guthrie, Don McLean, Holly Near, Peter, Paul & Mary.
A documentary film about the folk singing group, The Weavers, covering their career and the effects of their blacklisting during the McCarthy era. Interviews each member of the group and shows their preparation for a reunion concert at Carnegie Hall on November 28, 1980, twenty-five years after their last Carnegie Hall concert in 1955. Includes segments of the 1980 concert.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
xiii, 352 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Introduction Chapter 1: From Harlem, Jamaica, and the Segregated Navy to New York City's Interracial Left-Wing Culture, 1927-1948 Chapter 2: Black Left, White Stage, Cold War: Moving into the Spotlight, 1949-1954 Chapter 3: Multimedia Stardom and the Struggle for Racial Equality, 1955-1960 Chapter 4: Storming the Gates: Producing Film and Television, 1957-1970 Afterword Abbreviations for Notes Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292729148 20160617
A son of poor Jamaican immigrants who grew up in Depression-era Harlem, Harry Belafonte became the first black performer to gain artistic control over the representation of African Americans in commercial television and film. Forging connections with an astonishing array of consequential players on the American scene in the decades following World War II - from Paul Robeson to Ed Sullivan, John Kennedy to Stokely Carmichael - Belafonte established his place in American culture as a hugely popular singer, matinee idol, internationalist, and champion of civil rights, black pride, and black power. In Becoming Belafonte, Judith E. Smith presents the first full-length interpretive study of this multitalented artist. She sets Belafonte's compelling story within a history of American race relations, black theater and film history, McCarthy-era hysteria, and the challenges of introducing multifaceted black culture in a moment of expanding media possibilities and constrained political expression. Smith traces Belafonte's roots in the radical politics of the 1940s, his careful negotiation of the complex challenges of the Cold War 1950s, and his full flowering as a civil rights advocate and internationally acclaimed performer in the 1960s. In Smith's account, Belafonte emerges as a relentless activist, a questing intellectual, and a tireless organizer. From his first national successes as a singer of Calypso-inflected songs to the dedication he brought to producing challenging material on television and film regardless of its commercial potential, Belafonte stands as a singular figure in American cultural history - a performer who never shied away from the dangerous crossroads where art and politics meet. A son of poor Jamaican immigrants who grew up in Depression-era Harlem, Harry Belafonte became the first black performer to gain artistic control over the representation of African Americans in commercial television and film. Forging connections with an astonishing array of consequential players on the American scene in the decades following World War II - from Paul Robeson to Ed Sullivan, John Kennedy to Stokely Carmichael - Belafonte established his place in American culture as a hugely popular singer, matinee idol, internationalist, and champion of civil rights, black pride, and black power.In Becoming Belafonte, Judith E. Smith presents the first full-length interpretive study of this multitalented artist. She sets Belafonte's compelling story within a history of American race relations, black theater and film history, McCarthy-era hysteria, and the challenges of introducing multifaceted black culture in a moment of expanding media possibilities and constrained political expression. Smith traces Belafonte's roots in the radical politics of the 1940s, his careful negotiation of the complex challenges of the Cold War 1950s, and his full flowering as a civil rights advocate and internationally acclaimed performer in the 1960s. In Smith's account, Belafonte emerges as a relentless activist, a questing intellectual, and a tireless organizer. From his first national successes as a singer of Calypso-inflected songs to the dedication he brought to producing challenging material on television and film regardless of its commercial potential, Belafonte stands as a singular figure in American cultural history - a performer who never shied away from the dangerous crossroads where art and politics meet.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292729148 20160617
Green Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
xviii, 843 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part One: 1939-1964. Billie Holiday, "Strange fruit" ; Woody Guthrie, "This land is your land" ; Zilpha Horton, Frank Hamilton, Guy Carawan and Pete Seeger, "We shall overcome" ; Bob Dylan, "Masters of war" ; Nina Simone, "Mississippi Goddam"
  • Part Two: 1965-1973. Country Joe and the Fish ; "I-feel-like-I'm-fixin' -to-die rag" ; James Brown, "Say it loud - I'm black and I'm proud" ; Plastic Ono Band, "Give peace a chance" ; Edwin Starr, "War" ; Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, "Ohio" ; Gil Scott-Heron, "The revolution will not be televised" ; Stevie Wonder, "Living for the city"
  • Part Three: 1973-1977 (Chile, Nigeria, Jamaica). Victor Jara, "Manifesto" ; Fela Kuti and Afrika 70, "Zombie" ; Max Romeo and the Upsetters, "War in Babylon"
  • Part Four: 1977-1987. The Clash, "White riot" ; Carl Bean, "I was born this way" ; Linton Kwesi Johnson, "Sonny's lettah (Anti-Sus poem)" ; The Dead Kennedys, "Holiday in Cambodia" ; Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five feat. Melle Mei and Duke Bootee, "The message" ; Crass, "How does it feel?" ; Frankie Goes to Hollywood, "Two tribes" ; U2, "Pride (In the name of love)" ; The Special AKA, "Nelson Mandela" ; Billie Bragg, "Between the wars" ; R.E.M., "Exhuming McCarthy"
  • Part Fivd: 1989-2008. Public Enemy, "Fight the power" ; Huggy Bear, "Her jazz" ; The Prodigy feat. Pop Will Eat Itslf, "Their law" ; Manic Street Preachers, "Of walking abortion" ; Rage Against the Machine, "Sleep now in the fire" ; Steve Earle, "John Walker's blues" ; Green Day, "American Idiot"
  • Appendices. Protest songs before 1900 ; Songs and albums mentioned in the text ; One hundred recommended songs.
Why 33? Partly because that's the number of rotations performed by a vinyl album in one minute, and partly because it takes a lot of songs to tell a story which spans seven decades and five continents - to capture the colour and variety of this shape-shifting genre. This is not a list book, rather each of the 33 songs offers a way into a subject, an artist, an era or an idea. The book feels vital, in both senses of the word: necessary and alive. It captures some of the energy that is generated when musicians take risks, and even when they fail, those endeavours leave the popular culture a little richer and more challenging. Contrary to the frequently voiced idea that pop and politics are awkward bedfellows, it argues that protest music is pop, in all its blazing, cussed glory.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780571241347 20160605
Green Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (97 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Over the course of a meteoric music career that spanned two turbulent decades, Phil Ochs sought the bright lights of fame and social justice in equal measure, a contradiction that eventually tore him apart. From youthful idealism to rage to pessimism, the arc of Ochs's life paralleled that of the times, and the anger, satire, and righteous indignation that drove his music also drove him to dark despair. A timely and relevant tribute to an unlikely American hero.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
ix, 190 p., [18] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), music ; 23 cm.
  • The early decades
  • African American songs
  • Labor/union songs : part 1
  • The later 1930s and the war years
  • The postwar years to 1960
  • Recent decades.
In this wide-ranging and accessible survey of American labour songs, Ronald D. Cohen chronicles the history behind the work songs of cowboys, sailors, hoboes, and others, as well as the singing culture of groups ranging from the Industrial Workers of the World to Pete Seeger's "People's Songs." He discusses protest songs, the links between labour songs and the Left, the importance of labour song leaders such as Joe Glazer, labour musicals and songsters, and the folk music movement from Lead Belly and the Almanac Singers through Woody Guthrie. Ronald D. Cohen is a professor emeritus of history at Indiana University Northwest and the author of many books on radical history and folk music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780974412481 20160605
Green Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
xvi, 223 p. : ill. ; 22 cm. + 1 sound disc (digital ; 4 3/4 in.)
  • TRACK LIST-- FOREWORD FROM SERIES EDITORS MICHAEL STOFF AND JAMES WEST DAVIDSON-- FOREWORD-- PROLOGUE-- 1. - "Talking Union"-- 2. - "If I Had a Hammer"-- 3. - "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?"-- 4. - "We Shall Overcome"-- 5. - "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy"-- 6. - "Sailing Down my Golden River"-- AFTERWORD-- NOTES-- BIBLIOGRAPHY-- AUDIO CREDITS-- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195324822 20160528
Folk music has long played a vital role in supporting reform movements in the United States. Radical activists, seeking to counter a variety of abuses in mid-to-late 20th century America, often used music to express their hopes, aims, and goals. In "To Everything There Is a Season": Pete Seeger and the Power of Song, Allan Winkler describes how folk singer Pete Seeger applied his musical talents to improve conditions for less fortunate people everywhere. This book uses Seeger's long life and wonderful songs to reflect on the important role folk music played in various protest movements and to answer such fundamental questions as: What was the source of Seeger's appeal? How did he capture the attention and affection of people around the world? And why is song such a powerful medium? For over half of a century, Pete Seeger's life and music cut across the major issues of the day. A tireless supporter of union organization in the 1930s and 1940s, he joined the Communist Party, performing his songs with banjo and guitar accompaniment to promote worker solidarity. He sang out against American involvement in World War II in the early 1940s, only to change his tune after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He enlisted in the Army and, still singing, served overseas in the South Pacific. In the 1950s, he found himself under attack during the Red Scare for his radical past. He narrowly escaped a long jail term for refusing to cooperate with the House Committee on Un-American Activities, when his contempt conviction was thrown out on a technicality. In the 1960s, he became the minstrel of the civil rights movement, focusing its energy with songs that inspired protestors and challenged the nation's patterns of racial discrimination. Toward the end of the decade, he turned his musical talents to resisting the war in Vietnam, and again drew fire from those who attacked his dissent as treason. Finally, in the 1970s, he lent his voice to the growing environmental movement by leading the drive to clean up the Hudson River, which flowed almost literally through his backyard in New York State. His life reflected the turbulence of his times as his songs sounded the spirit of the issues that he felt mattered most. A sample of Seeger's music accompanies this book. Songs include "If I Had a Hammer, " with its call to confront injustice; "Where Have all the Flowers Gone?" and its lyrical appeal to stop the cycle of war; and "We Shall Overcome, " the standard hymn of the struggle for freedom. Richly researched and crisply written, Allan Winkler provides a gripping account of the power of Pete Seeger's songs in promoting a better world for us all.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195324822 20160528
Green Library, Music Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (90 min.) : sd., col. and b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
This film explores Guthrie's creative genius -- his life and music as well as lesser known talents like writing and painting. Every American who has listened to the radio knows Guthrie's 'This Land Is Your Land.' The music of the folk singer/songwriter has been recorded by everyone from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir to U2.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (84 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
  • I remember, I believe
  • Joan Little
  • In the upper room
  • In the morning when I rise
  • We shall not be moved
  • Fulani chant
  • Ballad of Harry T. Moore
  • Denko
  • Young and positive
  • Ballad of the broken word
  • Prayer to the One
  • The women gather
  • Nature song
  • Come unto Me
  • Old Ship of Zion (encore).
A documentary about the 30 year career of the a cappella vocal group Sweet Honey in the Rock. Includes concert footage, archival stills and footage, behind the scenes footage, and in-depth interviews with group members.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (88 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
A documentary film, featuring interviews and performance footage, looking at women's music and how the movement came to prominence.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videodisc (57 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
  • Special features: Extended scenes (25 min.); extended interviews (53 min.); reference and information web links.
A examination of the anti-lynching protest song made famous by Billie Holiday. Reviews the historical events, contexts and incidents of racial hatred that the song's title represents, and then the subsequent performances by Billie Holiday that brought the song and its message to a national audience. The film also follows the underlying problem of racism that continues into contemporary culture.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
xx, 427 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
www.aspresolver.com Black Thought and Culture
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Music recording
10 sound discs : digital ; 4 3/4 in., 212 p. : ill. (some col.), music ; 31 cm.
  • disc 1. The Leftist roots of the folk revival
  • disc 2. Theatre and cabaret performers, 1936-1941
  • disc 3. The Almanac Singers, March 1941-July 1941
  • disc 4. Fighting the Fascists, 1942-1944
  • disc 5. World War II and the folk revival
  • disc 6. The People's songs era, 1945-1949
  • disc 7. Pete Seeger, 1946-1948
  • disc 8. Charter Records, 1946-1949
  • disc 9. Campaign songs, 1944-1949
  • disc 10. An era closes, 1949-1953.
Media & Microtext Center, Music Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
xi, 367 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Book
xix, 266 p. : ill., music, ports. ; 26 cm.
Montgomery, Alabama, 1955: Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat on the bus to a white man. A local pastor, Martin Luther King Jr, agrees to let people meet in his church to discuss what to do. The civil rights movement has begun. Pete Seeger and Robert Reiser tell the story of how the movement unfolded, building their narrative around the words of the people who were there, the photographs and the songs. It is a story of courage and resilience on the part of ordinary people, and the powerful force of an idea whose time had come. The authors record the sit-ins, freedom rides and marches of the movement, not forgetting the stones, the burning buses, or the jails. But their emphasis is on the triumphs large and small, the victory for black and white alike, and the need to remember and celebrate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393026467 20160527
In words, photographs and music, "Everybody Says Freedom" tells the story of the civil rights movement. Documenting the sit-ins, freedom rides and marches that occurred along the path to triumph in an uncertain age, Pete Seeger and Bob Reiser build their narrative around the accounts of people involved and the songs that inspired their struggle. This narrative scrapbook collects forty songs and includes profiles of activists and a chronological outline of the extraordinary events from 1955 to 1968. It is a story of courage and resilience on the part of ordinary people. From "This Little Light of Mine" to "We Shall Overcome", the music of the time was both encouragement and catharsis for those who struggled against adversity in an effort to change the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393306040 20160528
Green Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Video
1 videocassette (78 min) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
A reunion of the folksinging group, The Weavers. Includes part of their historic last performance at Carnegie Hall.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-55N-01, FEMGEN-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01
Music score
368 p. illus. 26 cm.
Green Library, Music Library
AMSTUD-55N-01, HISTORY-55N-01