Book
ix, 315 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xv, 350 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • A city to be transformed
  • Imagining a "cultured" Tashkent
  • War and evacuation
  • Central Asian lives at war
  • The postwar Soviet city, 1945-1953
  • Central Asian Tashkent and the postwar Soviet state
  • Redesigning Tashkent after Stalin
  • The Tashkent model
  • Epilogue.
Paul Stronski tells the fascinating story of Tashkent, an ethnically diverse, primarily Muslim city that became the prototype for the Soviet-era reimagining of urban centers in Central Asia. Based on extensive research in Russian and Uzbek archives, Stronski shows us how Soviet officials, planners, and architects strived to integrate local ethnic traditions and socialist ideology into a newly constructed urban space and propaganda showcase.The Soviets planned to transform Tashkent from a "feudal city" of the tsarist era into a "flourishing garden, " replete with fountains, a lakeside resort, modern roadways, schools, hospitals, apartment buildings, and of course, factories. The city was intended to be a shining example to the world of the successful assimilation of a distinctly non-Russian city and its citizens through the catalyst of socialism. As Stronski reveals, the physical building of this Soviet city was not an end in itself, but rather a means to change the people and their society. Stronski analyzes how the local population of Tashkent reacted to, resisted, and eventually acquiesced to the city's socialist transformation. He records their experiences of the Great Terror, World War II, Stalin's death, and the developments of the Krushchev and Brezhnev eras up until the earthquake of 1966, which leveled large parts of the city. Stronski finds that the Soviets established a legitimacy that transformed Tashkent and its people into one of the more stalwart supporters of the regime through years of political and cultural changes and finally during the upheavals of glasnost.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822961130 20160606
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xix, 280 p., [24] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 20 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION-- PART 1: PHENOMENAL KNOWLEDGE-- 1. WHAT ROBOMARY KNOWS, DANIEL DENNET, TUFTS UNIVERSITY-- 2. SO THIS IS WHAT IT'S LIKE: A DEFENSE OF THE ABILITY HYPOTHESIS, LAURENCE NEMIROW, DAVIS GRAHAM & STUBBS INCOME TAX, BENEFITS & ESTATE GROUP-- 3. THE KNOWLEDGE ARGUMENT, DIAPHANOUSNESS, REPRESENTATIONALISM, FRANK JACKSON, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY, BRITISH ACADEMY, AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN AUSTRALIA, AND FAND INSTITUT INTERNATIONAL DE PHILOSOPHIE-- 4. DOES REPRESENTATIONALISM UNDERMINE THE KNOWLEDGE ARGUMENT?, TORIN ALTER, THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA-- 5. WHAT IS THIS THING YOU CALL COLOR: CAN A TOTALLY COLOR-BLIND PERSON KNOW ABOUT COLOR?, KNUT NORDBY, FORMERLY UNIVERSITY OF OSLO AND TELNOR COMMUNICATIONS, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT-- PART 2: PHENOMENAL CONCEPTS-- 6. WHAT IS A PHENOMENAL CONCEPT?, JANET LEVIN, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA-- 7. PHENOMENAL AND PERCEPTUAL CONEPTS, DAVID PAPINEAU, KING'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY-- 8. PHENOMENAL CONCEPTS AND THE MATERIALIST CONSTRAINT, JOSEPH LEVINE, THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT AMHERST-- 9. PHENOMENAL CONCEPTS AND THE EXPLANATORY GAP, DAVID CHALMERS, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY-- 10. DIRECT REFERENCE AND DANCING QUALIA, JOHN HAWTHORNE, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY-- 11. PROPERTY DUALISM, PHENOMENAL CONCEPTS, AND THE SEMANTIC PREMISE, STEPHEN WHITE, TUFTS UNIVERSITY-- 12. MAX BLACK'S OBJECTION TO MIND-BRAIN IDENTITY, NED BLOCK, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY-- 13. GRASPING PHENOMENAL PROPERTIES, MARTINE NIDA-RUMELIN, UNIVERSITY OF FRIBOURG.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195368635 20160528
  • PREFACE TO THE SECOND PAPERBACK EDITION-- NOTE ON THE TEXT-- LIST OF PLATES-- LIST OF MAPS-- INTRODUCTION-- 1. Historys cruel tricks-- 2. Reviving the dream-- 3. The drama of reform-- 4. Waiting for the end of the world-- 5. Survival and cannibalism in the rust belt-- 6. Democracy without liberalism?-- 7. Idealism and treason-- EPILOGUE-- NOTES-- FURTHER READING-- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195368642 20160528
Featuring extensive revisions to the text as well as a new introduction and epilogue-bringing the book completely up to date on the tumultuous politics of the previous decade and the long-term implications of the Soviet collapse-this compact, original, and engaging book offers the definitive account of one of the great historical events of the last fifty years. Combining historical and geopolitical analysis with an absorbing narrative, Kotkin draws upon extensive research, including memoirs by dozens of insiders and senior figures, to illuminate the factors that led to the demise of Communism and the USSR. The new edition puts the collapse in the context of the global economic and political changes from the 1970s to the present day. Kotkin creates a compelling profile of post Soviet Russia and he reminds us, with chilling immediacy, of what could not have been predicted-that the world's largest police state, with several million troops, a doomsday arsenal, and an appalling record of violence, would liquidate itself with barely a whimper. Throughout the book, Kotkin also paints vivid portraits of key personalities. Using recently released archive materials, for example, he offers a fascinating picture of Gorbachev, describing this virtuoso tactician and resolutely committed reformer as "flabbergasted by the fact that his socialist renewal was leading to the system's liquidation"-and more or less going along with it. At once authoritative and provocative, Armageddon Averted illuminates the collapse of the Soviet Union, revealing how "principled restraint and scheming self interest brought a deadly system to meek dissolution." Acclaim for the First Edition: "The clearest picture we have to date of the post-Soviet landscape." --The New Yorker "A triumph of the art of contemporary history. In fewer than 200 pagesKotkin elucidates the implosion of the Soviet empire-the most important and startling series of international events of the past fifty years-and clearly spells out why, thanks almost entirely to the 'principal restraint' of the Soviet leadership, that collapse didn't result in a cataclysmic war, as all experts had long forecasted." -The Atlantic Monthly "Concise and persuasive The mystery, for Kotkin, is not so much why the Soviet Union collapsed as why it did so with so little collateral damage." --The New York Review of Books.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195368635 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
x, 331 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix Chapter 1: Late Socialism An Eternal State 1 Chapter 2: Hegemony of Form Stalin's Uncanny Paradigm Shift 36 Chapter 3: Ideology Inside Out Ethics and Poetics 77 Chapter 4: Living "Vnye" Deterritorialized Milieus 126 Chapter 5: Imaginary West The Elsewhere of Late Socialism 158 Chapter 6: Tr ue Colors of Communism King Crimson, Deep Purple, Pink Floyd 207 Chapter 7: Dead Irony Necroaesthetics, "Stiob, " and the Anekdot 238 Conclusion 282 Bibliography 299 Index 319.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691121161 20160528
Soviet socialism was based on paradoxes that were revealed by the peculiar experience of its collapse. To the people who lived in that system the collapse seemed both completely unexpected and completely unsurprising. At the moment of collapse it suddenly became obvious that Soviet life had always seemed simultaneously eternal and stagnating, vigorous and ailing, bleak and full of promise. Although these characteristics may appear mutually exclusive, in fact they were mutually constitutive. This book explores the paradoxes of Soviet life, during the period of "late socialism" (1960s-1980s) through the eyes of the last Soviet generation. Focusing on the major transformation of the 1950s at the level of discourse, ideology, language, and ritual, Alexei Yurchak traces the emergence of multiple unanticipated meanings, communities, relations, ideals, and pursuits that this transformation subsequently enabled. His historical, anthropological, and linguistic analysis draws on rich ethnographic material from Late Socialism and the post-Soviet period. The model of Soviet socialism that emerges provides an alternative to binary accounts that describe that system as a dichotomy of official culture and unofficial culture, the state and the people, public self and private self, truth and lie - and ignore the crucial fact that, for many Soviet citizens, the fundamental values, ideals, and realities of socialism were genuinely important, although they routinely transgressed and reinterpreted the norms and rules of the socialist state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691121161 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xi, 436 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
"Revolution on My Mind" is a stunning revelation of the inner world of Stalin's Russia. We see into the minds and hearts of Soviet citizens who recorded their lives during an extraordinary period of revolutionary fervour and state terror. Writing a diary, like other creative expression, seems nearly impossible amid the fear and distrust of totalitarian rule; but as Jochen Hellbeck shows, diary-keeping was widespread, as individuals struggled to adjust to Stalin's regime. Rather than protect themselves against totalitarianism, many men and women bent their will to its demands, by striving to merge their individual identities with the collective and by battling vestiges of the old self within. We see how Stalin's subjects, from artists to intellectuals and from students to housewives, absorbed directives while endeavouring to fulfil the mandate of the Soviet revolution - re-creation of the self as a builder of the socialist society. Thanks to a newly discovered trove of diaries, we are brought face to face with individual life stories - gripping and unforgettably poignant. The diarists' efforts defy our liberal imaginations and our ideals of autonomy and private fulfilment. These Soviet citizens dreamed differently. They coveted a morally and aesthetically superior form of life, and were eager to inscribe themselves into the unfolding revolution. "Revolution on My Mind" is a brilliant exploration of the forging of the revolutionary self, a study without precedent that speaks to the evolution of the individual in mass movements of our own time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674021747 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xviii, 367 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Empire, nation, and the scientific state
  • Toward a revolutionary alliance
  • The national idea versus economic expediency
  • Cultural technologies of rule and the nature of Soviet power
  • The 1926 census and the conceptual conquest of lands and peoples
  • Border-making and the formation of Soviet national identities
  • Transforming "the peoples of the USSR" : ethnographic exhibits and the evolutionary timeline
  • The Nazi threat and the acceleration of the Bolshevik revolution
  • State-sponsored evolutionism and the struggle against German biological determinism
  • Ethnographic knowledge and terror.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01

7. Stalin [2005]

Book
xvii, 227 p. ; 21 cm.
  • 1. From Georgia to Russia 2. Revolutions and Civil War 3. Struggle for Power 4. 'Revolution from Above' 5. Famine and Terror 6. War 7. Gotterdammerung.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780582784796 20160528
This biography presents the enigmatic and extraordinary life of Stalin and explains why and how he became one of the most powerful Communist leaders of his time. Through recently uncovered research material and Stalin's archives in Moscow, Kuromiya analyzes how and why Stalin was rare, even unique politician who literally lived by politics alone. He further analyses how Stalin understood psychology or human relations well and how he used this understanding in his poltical reign and terror. Kuromiya provides a convincing, concise and up-to-date analysis of Stalin's political life. Profile in Power Series In recent years historians have been preoccupied with broad questions of structure and process, and many have become suspicious of biography and the 'Great Man" approach to history. On the other hand many students and readers continue to be drawn to history by an interest in individuals. This ambitious and wide-ranging series provides critical studies of key figures in international political history since 1500. The books are not biographies, though inevitably they contain much biographical material; rather they are succinct interpretative essays, analysing the major features of the career within the context of its own time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780582784796 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xx, 876 p., [32] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
A portrait of the head of the Soviet Union whose rule followed Stalin's identifies his impact on the country and the rest of the world, tracing his efforts to reform communism and ease the cold war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393051445 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xv, 416 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations ix List of Tables xi Acknowledgments xiii Introduction: Making Sense of War 7 PART I: DELINEATING THE BODY POLITIC 41 One Myth and Power: The Making of a Postwar Elite 43 Two "Living Up to the Calling of a Communist": Purification of the Rank and File 82 PART II: DELINEATING THE BODY SOCIOETHNIC 127 Three Excising Evil 129 Four Memory of Excision, Excisionary Memory 191 PART III: THE MAKING OF A POSTWAR SOVIET NATION 237 Five Integral Nationalism in the Trial of War 239 Six Peasants to Soviets, Peasants to Ukrainians 298 Afterword: A Soviet World without Soviet Power, a Myth of War without War 364 Bibliography 387 Index 411.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691057026 20160528
In "Making Sense of War" Amir Weiner reconceptualizes the entire historical experience of the Soviet Union from a new perspective, that of World War II. Breaking with the conventional interpretation that views World War II as a post-revolutionary addendum, Weiner situates this event at the crux of the development of the Soviet - not just the Stalinist - system. Through a richley detailed look at Soviet society as a whole, and at one Ukranian region in particular, the author shows how World War II came to define the ways in which members of the political elite as well as ordinary citizens viewed the world and acted upon their beliefs and ideologies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691057026 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xxv, 639 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
This study is a street-level inside account of what Stalinism meant to the masses of ordinary people who lived it. Stephen Kotkin was the first American in 45 years to be allowed into Magnitogorsk, a city built in response to Stalin's decision to transform the predominantly agricultural nation into a "country of metal". With unique access to previously untapped archives and interviews, Kotkin forges a vivid and compelling account of the impact of industrialization on a single urban community. Kotkin argues that Stalinism offered itself as an opportunity for enlightenment. The utopia it proffered, socialism, would be a new civilization based on the repudiation of capitalism. The extent to which the citizenry participated in this scheme and the relationship of the state's ambitions to the dreams of ordinary people form the substance of this story. Kotkin depicts a whole range of life: from the blast furnace workers who laboured in the enormous iron and steel plant, to the families who struggled with the shortage of housing and services.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520069084 20160528
This study is the first of its kind: a street-level inside account of what Stalinism meant to the masses of ordinary people who lived it. Stephen Kotkin was the first American in 45 years to be allowed into Magnitogorsk, a city built in response to Stalin's decision to transform the predominantly agricultural nation into a 'country of metal'. With unique access to previously untapped archives and interviews, Kotkin forges a vivid and compelling account of the impact of industrialization on a single urban community. Kotkin argues that Stalinism offered itself as an opportunity for enlightenment. The utopia it proffered, socialism, would be a new civilization based on the repudiation of capitalism. The extent to which the citizenry participated in this scheme and the relationship of the state's ambitions to the dreams of ordinary people form the substance of this fascinating story. Kotkin tells it deftly, with a remarkable understanding of the social and political system, as well as a keen instinct for the details of everyday life. Kotkin depicts a whole range of life: from the blast furnace workers who labored in the enormous iron and steel plant, to the families who struggled with the shortage of housing and services. Thematically organized and closely focused, "Magnetic Mountain" signals the beginning of a new stage in the writing of Soviet social history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520208230 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
x, 575 p. ; 25 cm.
This narrative history of Marxist/Leninist/Stalinist doctrines in the USSR examines the reasons why socialism was able to survive there for so long despite its failure to fulfil its promises. It traces the various stages of communism - "War Communism", the New Economic Policy and Stalinism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780029197950 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
126 p. ; 23 cm.
As communism collapses into ruins, Boris Groys examines the aesthetic goals pursued with such catastrophic consequences by its founders. Interpreting totalitarian art and literature in the context of cultural history, this essay likens totalitarian aims to the modernists' demands that art should move from depicting to transforming the world. The revolutionaries of October 1917 promised to create a society that was not only more just and more economically stable but also more beautiful, and they intended that the entire life of the nation be completely subordinate to Communist party leaders commissioned to regulate, harmonize and create a single "artistic" whole out of even the most minute details. What were the origins of this idea? And what were its artistic and literary ramifications? In addressing these issues, Groys questions the view that socialist realism was an "art for the masses". Groys argues instead that the "total art" proposed by Stalin and his followers was formulated by well-educated elites who had assimilated the experience of the avant-garde and been brought to socialist realism by the future-oriented logic of avant-garde thinking. After explaining the internal evolution of Stalinist art, Groys shows how socialist realism gradually disintegrated after Stalin's death. In an undecided and insecure Soviet culture, artists focused on restoring historical continuity or practicing "sots art", a term derived from the combined names of socialist realism ("sotsrealizm") and pop art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691055961 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
lv, 322 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xxvi, 328 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xii, 307 p., [20] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
This book discusses utopian ideals and experimentation before, during, and after the Russian Revolution of 1917. Richard Stites grounds his study in the larger field of Russia's social, intellectual, and cultural history, examining party programmes, economic policy, and moral practices to recreate the vast tableau of revolutionary life. Above all, he reveals how people expressed revolutionary sentiment through myth, ritual, symbol, cult, and community.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195055368 20160528
Stite's book received the 1990 Vucinich Prize, awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies for the best book published in 1989 in the field of Russian and East European studies. "The presentation is dynamic, fascinating, indeed brilliant, as well as fully expert...It is also a highly readable book...The book has already received much critical attention and great acclaim...In Revolutionary Dreams, we have a brilliantly presented historical work which is both pioneering and fundamental in its important field." - Nicholas V Riasanovsky (speech made on presentation of the Vucinich Prize).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195055375 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
xv, 301 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01

17. How Russia is ruled [1965 - ]

Book
ix, 698 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01

18. How Russia is ruled [1963]

Book
684 p. illus. 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
214 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01
Book
vii, 308 p. 20 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-224A-01, HISTORY-424A-01