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Book
167 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Why do walls marking national boundaries proliferate amid widespread proclamations of global connectedness and despite anticipation of a world without borders? Why are barricades built of concrete, steel, and barbed wire when threats to the nation today are so often miniaturized, vaporous, clandestine, dispersed, or networked? In Walled States, Waning Sovereignty, Wendy Brown considers the recent spate of wall building in contrast to the erosion of nation-state sovereignty. Drawing on classical and contemporary political theories of state sovereignty in order to understand how state power and national identity persist amid its decline, Brown considers both the need of the state for legitimacy and the popular desires that incite the contemporary building of walls. The new walls -- dividing Texas from Mexico, Israel from Palestine, South Africa from Zimbabwe -- consecrate the broken boundaries they would seem to contest and signify the ungovernability of a range of forces unleashed by globalization. Yet these same walls often amount to little more than theatrical props, frequently breached, and blur the distinction between law and lawlessness that they are intended to represent. But if today's walls fail to resolve the conflicts between globalization and national identity, they nonetheless project a stark image of sovereign power. Walls, Brown argues, address human desires for containment and protection in a world increasingly without these provisions. Walls respond to the wish for horizons even as horizons are vanquished.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781935408086 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
xviii, 442 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
For two thousand years the disparate groups that now reside in Zomia (a mountainous region the size of Europe that consists of portions of seven Asian countries) have fled the projects of the organized state societies that surround them - slavery, conscription, taxes, corvee labour, epidemics, and warfare. The book is essentially an 'anarchist history', the first-ever examination of the huge literature on state-making whose author evaluates why people would deliberately and reactively remain stateless. Among the strategies employed by the people of Zomia to remain stateless are: physical dispersion in rugged terrain; agricultural practices that enhance mobility; pliable ethnic identities; devotion to prophetic, millenarian leaders; and, maintenance of a largely oral culture that allows them to reinvent their histories and genealogies as they move between and around states. "The Art of Not Being Governed" challenges us with a radically different approach to history that views events from the perspective of stateless people and redefines state-making as a form of 'internal colonialism'. This new perspective requires a radical reevaluation of the civilizational narratives of the lowland states. Scott's work on Zomia represents a new way to think of area studies that will be applicable to other runaway, fugitive, and marooned communities, be they Gypsies, Cossacks, tribes fleeing slave raiders, Marsh Arabs, or San-Bushmen. In accessible language, James Scott, recognized worldwide as an eminent authority in Southeast Asian, peasant, and agrarian studies, tells the story of the people of Zomia and their unlikely odyssey in search of self-determination. Along the way he redefines our views on Asian politics, history, and demographics, and even our fundamental ideas about what constitutes civilization.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300152289 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
viii, 500 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Reversed colonialism
  • Conquest
  • New order
  • The embrace
  • The empire of the Plains
  • Greater Comanchería
  • Children of the sun
  • Hunger
  • Collapse
  • Conclusion: The shape of power.
In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, at the high tide of imperial struggles in North America, an indigenous empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. This powerful empire, built by the Comanche Indians, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, political prestige, economic power, commercial reach, and cultural influence. Yet, until now, the Comanche empire has gone unrecognized in historical accounts.This compelling and original book uncovers the lost story of the Comanches. It is a story that challenges the idea of indigenous peoples as victims of European expansion and offers a new model for the history of colonial expansion, colonial frontiers, and Indian-Euramerican relations in North America and elsewhere. Pekka Hamalainen shows in vivid detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they fell to defeat in 1875. With extensive knowledge and deep insight, the author brings into clear relief the Comanches' remarkable impact on the trajectory of history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300126549 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
xiv, 284 p. : col. ill., maps (chiefly col.) ; 27 cm.
  • List of Maps, Figures, and Tables Preface Introduction. Our House: The Twentieth Century at 4635 North Market Street Local Politics, Local Power: Governing Greater St. Louis, 1940-2000 "The Steel Ring": Race and Realty in Greater St. Louis Patchwork Metropolis: Municipal Zoning in Greater St. Louis Fighting Blight: Urban Renewal Policies and Programs, 1945-2000 City of Blight: The Limits of Urban Renewal in Greater St. Louis Conclusion. Our House Revisited: The Twenty-First Century at 4635 North Market Street Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812240702 20160528
Once a thriving metropolis on the banks of the Mississippi, St. Louis, Missouri, is now a ghostly landscape of vacant houses, boarded-up storefronts, and abandoned factories. The Gateway City is, by any measure, one of the most depopulated, deindustrialized, and deeply segregated examples of American urban decay. "Not a typical city, " as one observer noted in the late 1970s, "but, like a Eugene O'Neill play, it shows a general condition in a stark and dramatic form." Mapping Decline examines the causes and consequences of St. Louis's urban crisis. It traces the complicity of private real estate restrictions, local planning and zoning, and federal housing policies in the "white flight" of people and wealth from the central city. And it traces the inadequacy-and often sheer folly-of a generation of urban renewal, in which even programs and resources aimed at eradicating blight in the city ended up encouraging flight to the suburbs. The urban crisis, as this study of St. Louis makes clear, is not just a consequence of economic and demographic change; it is also the most profound political failure of our recent history. Mapping Decline is the first history of a modern American city to combine extensive local archival research with the latest geographic information system (GIS) digital mapping techniques. More than 75 full-color maps-rendered from census data, archival sources, case law, and local planning and property records-illustrate, in often stark and dramatic ways, the still-unfolding political history of our neglected cities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812240702 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
372 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
xv, 344 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
A re-examination of the basic geographical divisions we take for granted, this work challenges the unconscious spatial frameworks that govern the way we perceive the world. Arguing that East versus West, First World versus Third World, and the sevenfold continental system are simplistic and misconceived, the authors trace the history of such misconceptions. Their study reflects both on the global scale and its relation to the specific continents of Europe, Asia and Africa - actually part of one contiguous mass. This work sheds light on our metageographical assumptions grew out of cultural concepts: how the first continental divisions developed from the classical times; how the Urals became the division between the so-called continents of Europe and Asia; how countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan recently shifted macroregions in the general consciousness. The analysis also explores the ways new economic regions, the end of the Cold War, and the proliferation of communication technologies change our understanding of the world. It should stimulate thinking about the role of large-scale spatial constructs as driving forces behind particular world views and ecourages readers to take a.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520207431 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
xiii, 207 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 22 cm.
  • Foreword Acknowledgments 1: Introduction 2: Elements of the Map 3: Map Generalization: Little White Lies and Lots of Them 4: Blunders That Mislead 5: Maps That Advertise 6: Development Maps (or, How to Seduce the Town Board) 7: Maps for Political Propaganda 8: Maps, Defense, and Disinformation: Fool Thine Enemy 9: Large-Scale Mapping, Culture, and the National Interest 10: Data Maps: Making Nonsense of the Census 11: Color: Attraction and Distraction 12: Multimedia, Experiential Maps, and Graphic Scripts 13: Epilogue Appendix: Latitude and Longitude Selected Readings for Further Exploration Sources of Illustrations Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226534206 20160528
Originally published to wide acclaim, this illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must. The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of national interest and cultural values in national mapping organizations, including the United States Geological Survey, while the other explores the new breed of multimedia, computer-based maps. To show how maps distort, Monmonier introduces basic principles of mapmaking, gives entertaining examples of the misuse of maps in situations from zoning disputes to census reports, and covers all the typical kinds of distortions from deliberate oversimplifications to the misleading use of color.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226534206 20160528
Green Library, Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01
Book
iv, 129 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-201B-01, HISTORY-401A-01