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Book
313 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
xviii, 232 p. ; 23 cm.
  • List of Abbreviations Preface and Acknowledgements Introduction How The Church Lost Its Monopoly Of Burial, 1820-1852 Cremation Legalised, 1852-1884 The Early Years of Cremation, 1884-1914 The Development of Cremation, 1914-1939 The Advance of Cremation: Wartime and Reconstruction, 1939-1952 The Popularisation of Cremation in England, 1952-2000 Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780333692981 20160528
Three quarters of us now choose cremation for our funerals. Researched from original sources, From Dust to Ashes is the first full-length account of this process in Briatin and analyses the religious, political, economic and social reasons behind our individual choices. The 'Victorian way of death' was challenged by a succession of reformers. One such was Queen Victoria's surgeon, Sir Henry Thompson, who founded the Cremation Society in 1874. Cremation won its first legal recognition in the trail of the Welsh druid, Dr William Price, in 1884. Despite the Cremation Act 1902, cremation was slow to win public approval, but in the conditions of a twentieth-century society twice at war, cremation grew rapidly after 1945. Today, the cremation movement is responding to new challenges, of which environmental concerns are the chief. This book will be fascinating and authoritative reading for social anthroplogists, social historians, sociologists of the family, as well as funeral directors in training.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780333692981 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
xi, 242 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In Imperial Japan, as elsewhere in the modernizing world, funerals, burials, and other mortuary rites had developed over the centuries with the aim of building continuity in the face of loss. As the Japanese coped with the economic, political, and social changes that radically remade their lives in the decades after the Meiji Restoration (1868), they clung to local customs and Buddhist rituals such as sutra readings and incense offerings that for generations had given meaning to death. Yet death, as this highly original study shows, was not impervious to nationalism, capitalism, and the other isms that constituted and still constitute modernity. As Japan changed, so did its handling of the inevitable. Following an overview of the early development of funerary rituals in Japan, Andrew Bernstein demonstrates how diverse premodern practices from different regions and social strata were homogenized with those generated by middle-class city dwellers to create the form of funerary practice dominant today. He also explores the conflict-filled process of remaking burial practices, which gave rise, in part, to the suburban "soul parks" now prevalent throughout Japan; the (largely failed) attempt by nativists to replace Buddhist death rites with Shinto ones; and the rise and fall of the funeral procession.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824828745 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
xii, 230 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
xiv, 210 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of illustrations-- Acknowledgements-- A note on conventions-- Reigns of Ming and Qing emperors-- Introduction-- 1. Death and the state in imperial China: continuities-- 2. The reorientation of Ming attitudes toward mourning-- 3. The early Qing transformation of mourning practice-- 4. The bureaucratization of the Confucian li-- 5. The death of Xiaoxian and the crisis of Qianlong rule-- 6. Death and Chinese society-- Select bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521624398 20160528
As a conquest dynasty, Qing China's new Manchu leaders desperately needed to legitimize their rule. To win the approval of China's native elites, they developed an ambitious plan to return Confucianism to civil society. Filial piety, the core Confucian value, would once again be upheld by the state, and laborious and time-consuming mourning rituals, the touchstones of a well-ordered Confucian society, would be observed by officials throughout the empire. In this way, the emperor would be following the ancient dictate that he 'govern all-under-heaven with filial piety'. Norman Kutcher's study of mourning looks beneath the rhetoric to demonstrate how the state - unwilling to make the sacrifices that a genuine commitment to proper mourning demanded - quietly but forcefully undermined, not reinvigorated, the Confucian mourning system. With acute sensitivity to language and its changing meanings, Kutcher sheds light on a wide variety of issues that are of interest to historians of late Imperial China.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521624398 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
xv, 334 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Susan Naquin, "Funerals in North China: Uniformity and Variation" Stuart E. Thompson, "Feeding the Dead: The Role of Food in Chinese Funerary Ritual" James L. Watson, "Pollution, Performance, and the Structure of Rites" Elizabeth L. Johnson, "Grieving for the Dead, Grieving for the Living: Funeral Laments of Hakka Women" Emily Martin, "Gender and Ideological Differences in Representations of Life and Death" Myron L. Cohen, "Souls and Salvation: Conflicting Themes in Chinese Popular Religion" Rubie S. Watson, "Remembering the Dead: Graves and Politics in South China" Evelyn S. Rawski, "The Imperial Way of Death" Frederic Wakeman, Jr., "Mao's Remains" Martin K. Whyte, "Death in the People's Republic of China".
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520071292 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
x, 236 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface-- 1. Introduction: death and the regeneration of life Maurice Bloch and Jonathan Parry-- 2. The dead and the devils among the Bolivian Laymi Olivia Haris-- 3. Sacrificial death and the necrophagous ascetic Jonathan Parry-- 4. Witchcraft, greed, cannibalism and death: some related themes from the New Guinea Highlands Andrew Strathern-- 5. Lugbara death John Middleton-- 6. Of flesh and bones: the management of death pollution in Cantoese society James L. Watson-- 7. Social dimensions of death in four African hunting and gathering societies James Woodburn-- 8. Death, women and power Maurice Bloch-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521270373 20160528
It is a classical anthropological paradox that symbols of rebirth and fertility are frequently found in funerary rituals throughout the world. The original essays collected here re-examine this phenomenon through insights from China, India, New Guinea, Latin America, and Africa. The contributors, each a specialist in one of these areas, have worked in close collaboration to produce a genuinely innovative theoretical approach to the study of the symbolism surrounding death, an outline of which is provided in an important introduction by the editors. The major concern of the volume is the way in which funerary rituals dramatically transform the image of life as a dialectic flux involving exchange and transaction, marriage and procreation, into an image of a still, transcendental order in which oppositions such as those between self and other, wife-giver and wife-taker, Brahmin and untouchable, birth and therefore death have been abolished. This transformation often involves a general devaluation of biology, and, particularly, of sexuality, which is contrasted with a more spiritual and controlled source of life. The role of women, who are frequently associated with biological processes, mourning and death pollution, is often predominant in funerary rituals, and in examining this book makes a further contribution to the understanding of the symbolism of gender. The death rituals and the symbolism of rebirth are also analysed in the context of the political processes of the different societies considered, and it is argued that social order and political organisation may be legitimated through an exploitation of the emotions and biology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521270373 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01
Book
xvii, 651 p., [12] leaves of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
HISTORY-298G-01, HISTORY-398G-01