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Book
xvi, 389 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Introduction Chapter 1: Settled Agriculture: The Ancient Origins of Community, State, and Empire Chapter 2: From Antiquity to the Eve of Agrarian Capitalism: Peasants and Dynastic States Chapter 3: Agrarian Capitalism in the Early Modern World: Divergence in Eurasia Chapter 4: Malthusian Limits in the Early Modern World: Peasants and Markets Chapter 5: The New World: Planters, Slaves, and Sugar Chapter 6: American Farming: Agrarian Roots of U.S. Capitalism Chapter 7: New Imperialism: Colonial Agriculture in the Age of Capitalism Chapter 8: Socialist Agriculture: Collectivization in Three Countries Chapter 9: Late Development: State-led Agrarian Change after World War II Chapter 10: Corporate Agriculture: Comparing the United States and Brazil Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442209671 20170731
This innovative text provides a compelling narrative world history through the lens of food and farmers. Tracing the history of agriculture from earliest times to the present, Christopher Isett and Stephen Miller argue that people, rather than markets, have been the primary agents of agricultural change. Exploring the actions taken by individuals and groups over time and analyzing their activities in the wider contexts of markets, states, wars, the environment, population increase, and similar factors, the authors emphasize how larger social and political forces inform decisions and lead to different technological outcomes. Both farmers and elites responded in ways that impeded economic development. Farmers, when able to trade with towns, used the revenue to gain more land and security. Elites used commercial opportunities to accumulate military power and slaves. The book explores these tendencies through rich case studies of ancient China; precolonial South America; early-modern France, England, and Japan; New World slavery; colonial Taiwan; socialist Cuba; and many other periods and places. Readers will understand how the promises and problems of contemporary agriculture are not simply technologically derived but are the outcomes of decisions and choices people have made and continue to make.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442209671 20170731
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
1 online resource (416 pages) : illustrations, maps
  • part I. Becoming mainstream : "way learning" during the late empire
  • part II. Unintended consequences of civil examinations
  • part III. Retooling civil examinations to suit changing times.
Benjamin Elman describes how education, examinations, and civil service fostered the world' s first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge. Chinese civil examinations, a piece of social engineering worked out over centuries, prefigured the regime of meritocratic exams that undergirds higher education around the globe today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674726048 20180604
Chinese civil examinations, a piece of social engineering worked out over centuries, prefigured the regime of meritocratic exams that undergirds higher education around the globe today. This book describes how education, examinations, and civil service fostered the world's first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674724952 20180604
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xi, 401 pages ; 24 cm
Chinese civil examinations, a piece of social engineering worked out over centuries, prefigured the regime of meritocratic exams that undergirds higher education around the globe today. This book describes how education, examinations, and civil service fostered the world's first professional class based on demonstrated knowledge.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674724952 20180604
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xi, 331 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The Industrial Revolution and the pre-industrial economy-- Part I: 2. The high wage economy of pre-industrial Britain-- 3. The agricultural revolution-- 4. The cheap energy economy-- 5. Why England succeeded-- Part II: 6. Why was the Industrial Revolution British?-- 7. The steam engine-- 8. Cotton-- 9. Coke smelting-- 10. Inventors, enlightenment, and human capital-- 11. From industrial revolution to modern economic growth.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521687850 20160528
Why did the industrial revolution take place in eighteenth-century Britain and not elsewhere in Europe or Asia? In this convincing new account Robert Allen argues that the British industrial revolution was a successful response to the global economy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He shows that in Britain wages were high and capital and energy cheap in comparison to other countries in Europe and Asia. As a result, the breakthrough technologies of the industrial revolution - the steam engine, the cotton mill, and the substitution of coal for wood in metal production - were uniquely profitable to invent and use in Britain. The high wage economy of pre-industrial Britain also fostered industrial development since more people could afford schooling and apprenticeships. It was only when British engineers made these new technologies more cost-effective during the nineteenth century that the industrial revolution would spread around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521687850 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xxiii, 673 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : the Sibao book trade and Qing society
  • The setting : Minxi and Sibao
  • The origins of publishing and the production of books in Sibao
  • The structure of the Sibao publishing industry
  • "We are all brothers" : household division, the proliferation of publishing houses, and the management of competition
  • Sibao bookselling routes
  • Sojourning bookselling and the operation of the branch shops
  • Sibao's "Confucian merchants" in Minxi society and the late Imperial economy
  • The nature and sources of Sibao imprints
  • Educational works
  • Guides to good manners, good health, and good fortune
  • Fiction and belles-lettres
  • Sibao's customers and popular textual culture in the Qing
  • The diffusion of print culture in Qing China.
Sibao today is a cluster of impoverished villages in the mountains of western Fujian. Yet, from the late 17th to the early 20th Century, it was home to a flourishing publishing industry. Through itinerant booksellers and branch bookshops managed by Sibao natives, this industry supplied much of south China with cheap educational texts, household guides, medical handbooks, and fortune-telling manuals. It is precisely the ordinariness of Sibao imprints that make them valuable for the study of commercial publishing, the text-production process, and the geographical and social expansion of book culture in Chinese society. In a study with important implications for cultural and economic history, Cynthia Brokaw describes rural, lower-level publishing and bookselling operations at the end of the imperial period. "Commerce in Culture" traces how the poverty and isolation of Sibao necessitated a bare-bones approach to publishing and bookselling and how the Hakka identity of the Sibao publishers shaped the configuration of their distribution networks and even the nature of their publications. Sibao's industry reveals two major trends in print culture: the geographical extension of commercial woodblock publishing to hinterlands previously untouched by commercial book culture and the related social penetration of texts to lower-status levels of the population.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674024496 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
127 p. ; 22 cm.
Written by one of the most distinguished experts on China's economic and business history, "China and Capitalism" provides a highly original and at the same time clear and readable approach to understanding the development of business in China from 1500 to the 1990s. David Faure then uses the picture he has assembled to shed new light on the strengths and weaknesses of Chinese business today. The book is written to be accessible to people with little background in China or Chinese business practice. Faure describes three phases in the development of Chinese business from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. In the traditional phase, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, Chinese business relied on contracts as well as on ritual propriety. In the modernizing phase, from the second half of the nineteenth century to the first half of the twentieth century, Chinese business had to adapt to the introduction of company law and legal standards of accounting. In the contemporary phase, from the middle of the twentieth century to the present day, China emerged from a control economy to a vibrant market by embracing once again the changes introduced in the modernizing phase. General readers, including students and teachers in courses touching on but not primarily devoted to the Chinese experience, will find in this book the most comprehensive account of China's business development in the last five centuries and many insights into the workings of China's modern business scene. Specialist readers will find a highly original approach to the history of business in China.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789622097841 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
x, 382 p. : 1 ill. ; 24 cm.
This text offers insight into one of the classic questions of history: why did sustained industrial growth begin in Northwest Europe, despite surprising similarities between advanced areas of Europe and East Asia?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691005430 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xxxiv, 816 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Tables and Illustrations Acknowledgments Preface PART ONE: PEKING AND ITS TEMPLES 1. Introducing Peking 2. Gods and Clerics 3. Communities and Public Space PART TWO: MING PEKING 4. A New Capital 5. Imperial Peking 6. Urban Communities 7. Late Ming Associations 8. Seeing the Sights PART THREE: QING PEKING 9. 1644: Partition and Transition 10. The Imperial World 11. New Divisions 12. Reintegration 13. The Sights of Qing Peking 14. Religious Associations 15. Temples and Private Purposes 16. Temples and Public Purposes Epilogue: In Search of Old Peking Appendix 1: Data on Temples Appendix 2: Data on Inscriptions Appendix 3: Donations to Ming and Qing Temples Bibliography Glossary-Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520219915 20160528
This text examines the city of Peking during the Ming and Qing periods. Using Peking's temples as a starting point, the book excavates the city's varied public arenas, its transformation over five centuries, its human engagements, and its rich cultural imprint.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520219915 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xx, 657 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In this study Sucheta Mazumdar offers an answer to the fundamental question of why China, universally acknowledged as one of the most developed economies in the world throughout the mid-18th century, paused in this development process in the 19th century. Focusing on cane-sugar production, domestic and international trade, technology, and the history of consumption for over 1000 years as a means of framing the larger questions, the author shows that the economy of late imperial China was not stagnant, nor was the state suppressing trade: indeed China was integrated into the world market well before the Opium War. However, the trajectory of development did not transform the social organization of production or set in motion sustained economic growth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674854086 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xviii, 428 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
In this long-awaited book, Paul Cohen examines the craft of historiography against the backdrop of a crucial event in modern Chinese history. The Boxer Rebellion of 1898-1900, an outcry against foreigners led by a group largely comprised of poor farmworkers, soon became a kind of cultural mythology for both sides, and the Boxers themselves became alternately patriots or xenophobes, heroes or fanatics. "History in Three Keys" masterfully juxtaposes the accounts of historians with those of the participants and witnesses and sets out these perspectives against the range of popular myths about the Boxers - and in doing so conveys the complexity of the historian's task in integrating these sometimes conflicting perspectives. As he works to reconcile them, Cohen skilfully illuminates the tension between the history that people make and the history that people use. The event as later narrated, the experience as it was lived, the myths into which a culture shapes its past - these are the three keys of history, the interplay of which effectively recasts history for subsequent generations. The Boxer uprising as event represents a particular reading of the past, while as myth it embodies an impressing of the past into the service of a particular reading of the present. Far from being an impartial observer, the historian is an active participant in the process of representing the past. Complemented by 36 photos and three maps, "History in Three Keys" is not only a bold rethinking of a watershed event in Chinese history and the conflicting ways in which it has survived in Chinese consciousness; it is also a groundbreaking contribution to current debates about the historian's craft.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231106504 20160528
A comprehensive look at the Boxer Rebellion of 1898-1900, a bloody uprising in north China against native Christians and foreign missionaries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231106511 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
235 p.
  • A note on conventions-- Introduction: Chinese brotherhoods and secret societies through the opium war-- 1. Brotherhood associations in Southeast China through the Lin Shuangwen rebellion-- 2. Brotherhood associations, secret societies, and rebellion: the background to the Lin Suangwen uprising-- 3. Rebellions with and without secret societies: Zhu Yigui and Lin Shuangwen compared-- 4. Secret societies and popular religion: the Tianhihui in the Western Fujian-Eastern Jiangxi region in the Jiaqing-Daoguang period-- 5. Marginality and ideology: Qing representations of brotherhood associations and secret societies-- 6. Chinese brotherhood associations and late imperial China-- Appendix A: Participation in the Lin Shuangwen uprising-- Appendix B: Chronology of the Lin Shuangwen uprising-- Notes-- Bibliography-- Glossary-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804726511 20160528
This study examines the emergence and evolution in China of a tradition of popular organization generally known under the rubric of secret society. The author suggests that the secret society is properly understood as one variety of the brotherhood association, a category that encompasses a range of popular fraternal organizations that flourished in the early and mid-Qing period. The book begins by describing the proliferation of brotherhood associations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, particularly in Southeast China. It concludes in the early nineteenth century, as the Qing suppression of the Lin Shuangwen rebellion in late 1780 s forced members of the best-known brotherhood association, the Heaven and Earth Society (Tiandihui) to flee their homes in the Southeast, taking refuge in other parts of South China and Southeast Asia and, eventually, in Chinatowns throughout the world. This episode set the stage for the violent nineteenth-century confrontations between the Qing state and the secret societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804726511 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
ix, 343 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
This work provides a new hypothesis for understanding the real nature of the term "White Lotus Teachings". The author argues that there are actually two different phenomena covered by similar terms: from c1130 until 1400 a lay Buddhist movement existed, which can be called the White Lotus movement. It enjoyed the respect of contemporary literati and religious elites. The movement used the autonym White Lotus Society, which came to be prohibited in the early Ming period and was discarded as a result. After 1525, the name reappeared in the form of White Lotus Teachings, but now only as a derogtory label, used by officials and litarati rather than by believers themselves. As a result of this hypothesis, the history of the White Lotus Teachings changes from one of religious groups and magicians into one of elite ideology and religious persecution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004094147 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
343 p.
This work provides a new hypothesis for understanding the real nature of the term "White Lotus Teachings". The author argues that there are actually two different phenomena covered by similar terms: from c1130 until 1400 a lay Buddhist movement existed, which can be called the White Lotus movement. It enjoyed the respect of contemporary literati and religious elites. The movement used the autonym White Lotus Society, which came to be prohibited in the early Ming period and was discarded as a result. After 1525, the name reappeared in the form of White Lotus Teachings, but now only as a derogtory label, used by officials and litarati rather than by believers themselves. As a result of this hypothesis, the history of the White Lotus Teachings changes from one of religious groups and magicians into one of elite ideology and religious persecution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004094147 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xii, 364 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- Part I. Notes on Famine in China: 1. Preliminary considerations on natural calamities-- 2. The problem of vagrancy-- 3. Social unrest-- 4. Famine and landlordism-- Part II. Bureaucratic Intervention: 5. Problems of bureaucratic organization-- 6. Investigating famine-- 7. Providing relief-- 8. Supplies: the example of 1743-1744-- 9. Controlling prices-- 10. Strengthening and rebuilding production-- Part III. Conclusion and perspectives: 11. Introductory remarks-- 12. The evolution of the state's economic means-- 13. Geographical distribution of famine relief-- 14. Recapitulation-- Appendix-- Character list-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804717335 20160527
In the eighteenth century, China experienced massive, unprecedented population growth. By the end of the century, certain Chinese observers began to look at this demographic transformation in such modern terms as over-population, diminishing returns, and pauperization. How, exactly when, and by what mechanisms did the Chinese population undergo what amounts to a historical mutation? The author finds one answer in the brief flowering of statecraft in the eighteenth-century Qing state, which devoted considerable resources to providing a high degree of economic security, ensuring equitable food distribution, and, above all, to successfully combating famine. The focus of the book is a detailed study of the drought-related famine that struck Zhili (now Hebei) province in 1743 and 1744 and of the government's efforts to cope with the disaster. In the process, the author examines the state's financial resources, the patterns of local organization, and the everyday life of the poor, all set within the wider structure of national economic decisionmaking. For this English edition, the author has added some new materials and revised portions of the text to incorporate the results of recent research.(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804717335 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xiii, 421 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- Part I. To 1949: 2. The Yangzi Delta ecosystem-- 3. Commercialization and family production-- 4. Commercialization and managerial agriculture-- 5. Commercialization and involutionary growth-- 6. Peasants and markets-- 7. Imperialism, urban development, and rural involution-- 8. Two kinds of village communities-- Part II. After 1949: 9. restructuring the old political economy-- 10. Collective, family, and sideline production-- 11. Growth versus development in agriculture-- 12. Rural industrialization-- 13. Capitalism versus socialism in rural development-- 14. Peasant-worker villages-- Part III. Conclusion: 15. A summing up-- 16. Some speculations-- Appendixes-- References-- Character list-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804717878 20160528
How can we account for the durability of subsistence farming in China despite six centuries of vigorous commercialization from 1350 to 1950 and three decades of collectivization between 1950 to 1980? Why did the Chinese rural economy not undergo the transformation predicted by the classical models of Adam Smith and Karl Marx? In attempting to answer this question, scholars have generally treated commercialization and collectivization as distinct from population increase, the other great rural change of the past six centuries. This book breaks new ground in arguing that in the Yangzi delta, China's most advanced agricultural region, population increase was what drove commercialization and collectivization, even as it was made possible by them. The processes at work, which the author terms involutionary commercialization and involutionary growth, entailed ever-increasing labor input per unit of land, resulting in expanded total output but diminishing marginal returns per workday. In the Ming-Qing period, involution usually meant a switch to more labor-intensive cash crops and low-return household sidelines. In post-revolutionary China, it typically meant greatly intensified crop production. Stagnant or declining returns per workday were absorbed first by the family production unit and then by the collective. The true significance of the 1980's reforms, the author argues, lies in the diversion of labour from farming to rural industries and profitable sidelines and the first increases for centuries in productivity and income per workday. With these changes have come a measure of rural prosperity and the genuine possibility of transformative rural development. By reconstructing Ming-Qing agricultural history and drawing on twentieth-century ethnographic data and his own field investigations, the author brings his large themes down to the level of individual peasant households. Like his acclaimed The Peasant Economy and Social Change in North China (1985), this study is noteworthy for both its empirical richness and its theoretical sweep, but it goes well beyond the earlier work in its inter-regional comparisons and its use of the pre- and post-1949 periods to illuminate each other.(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804717878 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
viii, 146 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • List of figures and tables-- Introduction-- 1. Definitions and concepts-- 2. The advanced organised economy-- 3. The mineral-based energy economy-- 4. Numbers and notions-- References-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521356480 20160528
The industrial revolution brought into being a new world, a world of greater affluence, longevity and mobility, an urban rather than a rural world. But the great surge of economic growth was balanced against severe constraints on the opportunities for expansion, revealing an intriguing paradox. This book, published to considerable critical acclaim, explores the paradox and attempts to provide a new 'model' of the changes that comprised the industrial revolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521356480 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xvii, 331 p. : maps ; 26 cm.
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xix, 451 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
xi, 369 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Note of place-names-- Part I. Background: 1. The issues-- 2. The sources and the villages-- 3. The ecological setting-- Part II. Economic Involution and Social Change: 4. Managerial farming and family farming in the 1930's-- 5. The small-peasant and estate economies of the early Qing-- 6. Commercialization and social stratification in the Qing-- 7. Accelerated commercialization in the twentieth century-- 8. Managerial farming and family farming: draft-animal use-- 9. Managerial farming and family farming: labor use-- 10. The underdevelopment of managerial farming-- 11. The persistence of small-peasant family farming-- 12. The commercialization of production relations-- Part III. The Village and the State: 13. Villages under the Qing state-- 14. Changes in the village community-- 15. Village and state in the twentieth century-- 16. Conclusion-- Appendixes-- Character list-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804712200 20160527
Winner of the John K. Fairbank Prize of the American Historical Association.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804712200 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01
Book
viii, 436 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: cities in the history of Europe and China-- Part I. The Emporium: 1. Hankow in the nineteenth century-- 2. The trade of Hankow-- 3. The salt trade-- 4. The tea trade-- 5. Credit and finance in Hankow-- 6. The state and commerce-- Part II. Urban Social Organization: 7. Local origin in an immigrant city-- 8. Guild structure-- 9. Guild functions-- 10. Guilds and local power-- Conclusion-- Notes-- Selected bibliography-- Character list-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804712040 20160528
This is the first volume of a two-volume social history of the commercial hub of central China in the nineteenth century. The emphasis here is on the dynamism of late imperial commerce, the relation of the metropolis to the hinterland, and the corporate institutions of the city, notably its guilds. The second volume, Hankow: Conflict and Community in a Chinese City, 1796-1895, focuses on the people of Hankow.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804712040 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-393A-01