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Book
264 pages ; 24 cm
Shares the story of the author's family and upbringing, describing how they moved from poverty to an upwardly mobile clan that included the author, a Yale Law School graduate, while navigating the demands of middle class life and the collective demons of the past.
Green Library, Law Library (Crown)
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
264 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
xvii, 236 pages ; 23 cm
  • Preface ix Acknowledgments xv Introduction 1 Part One: The Trans Moment 1 Transgender, Transracial? 15 "Transgender" and "Transracial" before the Dolezal Affair 17 The Field of Argument 21 "If Jenner, Then Dolezal": The Argument from Similarity 22 Boundary Work: The Argument from Difference 31 2 Categories in Flux 40 Unsettled Identities 41 The Empire of Choice 50 The Policing of Identity Claims 56 The New Objectivism 64 Part Two: Thinking with Trans 3 The Trans of Migration 71 Unidirectional Transgender Trajectories 74 Reconsidering "Transracial" 80 Transracial Trajectories, Past and Present 82 4 The Trans of Between 92 Transgender Betweenness: Oscillation, Recombination, Gradation 94 Racial and Gender Betweenness 101 Recombinatory Racial Betweenness: Classification and Identification 104 Performing Betweenness 108 5 The Trans of Beyond 113 Beyond Gender? 114 Beyond Race? 122 Conclusion 131 Notes 153 Bibliography 183 Index 229.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691172354 20161124
In the summer of 2015, shortly after Caitlyn Jenner came out as transgender, the NAACP official and political activist Rachel Dolezal was "outed" by her parents as white, touching off a heated debate in the media about the fluidity of gender and race. If Jenner could legitimately identify as a woman, could Dolezal legitimately identify as black? Taking the controversial pairing of "transgender" and "transracial" as his starting point, Rogers Brubaker shows how gender and race, long understood as stable, inborn, and unambiguous, have in the past few decades opened up--in different ways and to different degrees--to the forces of change and choice. Transgender identities have moved from the margins to the mainstream with dizzying speed, and ethnoracial boundaries have blurred. Paradoxically, while sex has a much deeper biological basis than race, choosing or changing one's sex or gender is more widely accepted than choosing or changing one's race. Yet while few accepted Dolezal's claim to be black, racial identities are becoming more fluid as ancestry--increasingly understood as mixed--loses its authority over identity, and as race and ethnicity, like gender, come to be understood as something we do, not just something we have. By rethinking race and ethnicity through the multifaceted lens of the transgender experience--encompassing not just a movement from one category to another but positions between and beyond existing categories--Brubaker underscores the malleability, contingency, and arbitrariness of racial categories. At a critical time when gender and race are being reimagined and reconstructed, Trans explores fruitful new paths for thinking about identity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691172354 20161124
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
288 pages ; 22 cm
"Raised in the "agrarian ghetto" of Dickens--improbably smack in the middle of downtown L.A.--the narrator of The Sellout resigned himself to the fate of all other middle-class Californians: "to die in the same bedroom you'd grown up in, looking up at the crack in the stucco ceiling that had been there since '68 quake." Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist at Riverside Community College, he spent his childhood as the subject in psychological studies, classic experiments revised to include a racially-charged twist. He also grew up believing this pioneering work might result in a memoir that would solve their financial woes. But when his father is killed in a shoot out with the police, he realizes there never was a memoir. All that's left is the bill for a drive-thru funeral and some maudlin what-ifs. Fuelled by this injustice and the general disrepair of his down-trodden hometown, he sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town's most famous resident--the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins, our narrator initiates a course of action--one that includes reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school--destined to bring national attention. These outrageous events land him with a law suit heard by the Supreme Court, the latest in a series of cases revolving around the thorny issue of race in America. The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. It challenges the most sacred tenets of the U.S. Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father-son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality--the black Chinese restaurant"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
xiii, 326 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition viii Author's Note x Tape Family Tree xiv Maps xv Part I : Strivings (1864-1883) 1. The Lucky One 3 2. The First Rescue 14 3. Joseph and Mary 24 Part II : School Days (1884-1894) 4. "That Chinese Girl" 43 5. Chinatown's Frontier 58 Part III: Native Sons and Daughters (1895-1904) 6. Suburban Squire 71 7. Two Marriages 83 8. The Chinese Village 95 Part IV: The Interpreter Class (1905-1917) 9. Blood and Fire 119 10. In Pursuit of Smugglers 135 11. Modern Life 150 12. The Trial 161 13. "Sailors Should Go Ashore" 173 Part V : Reinventions (1917-1950) 14. The New Daughter-in-Law 189 15. Loss 201 16. Service 207 Epilogue 223 Glossary of Chinese Names 231 Acknowledgments 233 Notes 235 Appendix: Documents from the Chinese Exclusion Era 277 Index 315.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691155326 20160608
"The Lucky Ones" uncovers the story of the Tape family in post-gold rush, racially explosive San Francisco. Mae Ngai paints a fascinating picture of how the role of immigration broker allowed patriarch Jeu Dip (Joseph Tape) to both protest and profit from discrimination, and of the Tapes as the first of a new social type - middle-class Chinese Americans. Tape family history illuminates American history. Seven-year-old Mamie attempts to integrate California schools, resulting in the landmark 1885 case Tape v. Hurley. The family's intimate involvement in the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair reveals how Chinese American brokers essentially invented Chinatown, and so Chinese culture, for American audiences. Finally, "The Lucky Ones" reveals aspects - timely, haunting, and hopeful - of the lasting legacy of the immigrant experience for all Americans. This expanded edition features a new preface and a selection of historical documents from the Chinese exclusion era that forms the backdrop to the Tape family's story.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691155326 20160608
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
xi, 288 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
798 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
This epic work tells the story of the Hemings family, whose close blood ties to the third president of America had been systematically expunged from history until very recently.Now, historian and legal scholar Annette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemingses from their origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family's dispersal after Thomas Jefferson's death in 1826. It brings to life not only Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson but also their children and Hemings' siblings, who shared a father with Jefferson's wife, Martha. "The Hemingses of Moticello" sets the family's compelling saga against the backdrop of revolutionary America, Paris on the eve of revolution, 1790s Philadelphia and plantation life at Monticello, Jefferson's estate in Virginia. Much anticipated, this book promises to be the most detailed history of an American slave family ever written.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393064773 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
798 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., map ; 24 cm.
  • pt. 1. Origins.
  • Young Elizabeth's world
  • John Wayles: the immigrant
  • The children of no one
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • The first Monticello
  • In the home of a revolutionary
  • pt. 2. The vaunted scene of Europe.
  • "A particular purpose"
  • James Hemings: the provincial abroad
  • "Isabel or Sally will come"
  • Dr. Sutton
  • The rhythms of the city
  • The eve of revolution
  • "During that time"
  • Sarah Hemings: the fatherless girl in a patriarchal society
  • The teenagers and the woman
  • "His promises on which she implicitly relied"
  • "The treaty" and "did they love each other?"
  • The return
  • pt. 3. On the mountain.
  • Hello and goodbye
  • Equilibrium
  • The brothers
  • Philadelphia
  • Exodus
  • The second Monticello
  • Into the future, echoes from the past
  • The ocean of life
  • The public world and the private domain
  • "Measurably happy": the children of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings
  • Retirement for one, not for all
  • Endings and beginnings.
This epic work tells the story of the Hemings family, whose close blood ties to the third president of America had been systematically expunged from history until very recently.Now, historian and legal scholar Annette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemingses from their origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family's dispersal after Thomas Jefferson's death in 1826. It brings to life not only Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson but also their children and Hemings' siblings, who shared a father with Jefferson's wife, Martha. "The Hemingses of Moticello" sets the family's compelling saga against the backdrop of revolutionary America, Paris on the eve of revolution, 1790s Philadelphia and plantation life at Monticello, Jefferson's estate in Virginia. Much anticipated, this book promises to be the most detailed history of an American slave family ever written.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393064773 20160528
Green Library, Law Library (Crown)
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
xxvii, 143 p. ; 24 cm.
Originally published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk is a classic study of race, culture, and education at the turn of the twentieth century. With its singular combination of essays, memoir, and fiction, this book vaulted Du Bois to the forefront of American political commentary and civil rights activism. It is an impassioned, at times searing account of the situation of African Americans in the United States, making a forceful case for the access of African Americans to higher education and extolling the achievements of black culture. Du Bois advances the provocative and influential argument that due to the inequalities and pressures of the "race problem, " African American identity is characterized by "double consciousness." This edition includes a valuable appendix of other writings by Du Bois, which sheds light on his motivation and his goals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195325737 20160527
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
x, 102 p. : ports. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01

11. Playing Indian [1998]

Book
249 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
This text explores how white Americans have used their ideas about American Indians to shape national identity in different eras, and how Indian people have reacted to these imitations of their native dress, language and ritual.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300071115 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
257 p. : ill., map ; 19 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
xii, 287 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Preface - Introduction: On the Strange Meaning of Being Black: Du Bois' American Tragedy - The Documents: The Souls of Black Folk, 1903 - Essays by du Bois: The Conservation of Races (1897) - The Development of a People (1904) - The Souls of Black Folk (1904) - Correspondence (17 items) on The Souls of Black Folk - Appendices: - Chronology - Questions for Consideration - Selected Bibliography - Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312091149 20160528
First published in 1903, this eloquent collection of essays exposed the magnitude of racism in our society. The book endures today as a classic document of American social and political history: a manifesto that has influenced generations with its transcendent vision for change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312128067 20160527
W.E.B. du Bois' The Souls of Black Folk is probably one of the most influential and widely read texts of all African American letters and history. The original 1903 edition is reprinted with extensive annotations by two prominent du Bois scholars - an historian and a philosopher. Three additional essays by du Bois are included and many items of correspondence which contextualize how people read the text in his own time. There is a substantial introduction to du Bois' life and writings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312091149 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
367 p.
Twentieth-century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between variant cultures in American history. Yet this study is among the first to examine the relationship between ethnicity and identity among the largest immigrant group to that city. By focusing on Mexican immigrants to Los Angeles from 1900 to 1945, George J. Sanchez explores the process by which temporary sojourners altered their orientation to that of permanent residents, thereby laying the foundation for a new Mexican-American culture. Analysing not only formal programs aimed at these newcomers by the United States and Mexico, but also the world created by these immigrants through family networks, religious practice, musical entertainment, and work ethics, Sanchez uncovers the creative ways Mexicans adapted their culture to life in the United States. When a formal repatriation campaign pushed thousands to return to Mexico, those remaining in Los Angeles launched new campaigns to gain civil rights as ethnic Americans through labor unions and New Deal politics. The immigrant generation, therefore, laid the groundwork for the emerging Mexican-American identity of their children.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195069907 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01, HISTORY-351F-01
Book
xxxviii, 246 p. ; 23 cm.
Two novels of early black American writing are combined in this volume. Written in 1928, "Quicksand" was one of the first novels to give a voice to the sexual desires of a black woman. "Passing", written by Nella Larsen a year later, has as its central theme black people who "pass" for white.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781852421441 20160527
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01
Book
xxxviii, 246 p. ; 23 cm.
Two novels of early black American writing are combined in this volume. Written in 1928, "Quicksand" was one of the first novels to give a voice to the sexual desires of a black woman. "Passing", written by Nella Larsen a year later, has as its central theme black people who "pass" for white.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781852421441 20160527
Green Library
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01