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Book
x, 622 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
xiv, 277 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations ix Acknowledgments xi Introduction 1 PART I: Nascent Policing Chapter 1: IMMIGRATION "A New Species of Undesirable Immigrant": Perverse Aliens and the Limits of the Law, 1900-1924 19 Chapter 2: MILITARY "We Are Merely Concerned with the Fact of Sodomy": Managing Sexual Stigma in the World War I-Era Military, 1917-1933 55 Chapter 3: WELFARE "Most Fags Are Floaters": The Problem of "Unattached Persons" during the Early New Deal, 1933-1935 91 PART II: Explicit Regulation Chapter 4: WELFARE "With the Ugly Word Written across It": Homo-Hetero Binarism, Federal Welfare Policy, and the 1944 GI Bill 137 Chapter 5: MILITARY "Finding a Home in the Army": Women's Integration, Homosexual Tendencies, and the Cold War Military, 1947-1959 174 Chapter 6: IMMIGRATION "Who Is a Homosexual?": The Consolidation of Sexual Identities in Mid-twentieth-century Immigration Law, 1952-1983 214 Conclusion 255 Index 265.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691135984 20160528
"The Straight State" is the most expansive study of the federal regulation of homosexuality yet written. Unearthing startling new evidence from the National Archives, Margot Canaday shows how the state systematically came to penalize homosexuality, giving rise to a regime of second-class citizenship that sexual minorities still live under today. Canaday looks at three key arenas of government control - immigration, the military, and welfare - and demonstrates how federal enforcement of sexual norms emerged with the rise of the modern bureaucratic state. She begins at the turn of the twentieth century when the state first stumbled upon evidence of sex and gender nonconformity, revealing how homosexuality was policed indirectly through the exclusion of sexually 'degenerate' immigrants and other regulatory measures aimed at combating poverty, violence, and vice. Canaday argues that the state's gradual awareness of homosexuality intensified during the later New Deal and through the postwar period as policies were enacted that explicitly used homosexuality to define who could enter the country, serve in the military, and collect state benefits. Midcentury repression was not a sudden response to newly visible gay subcultures, Canaday demonstrates, but the culmination of a much longer and slower process of state-building during which the state came to know and to care about homosexuality across many decades. Social, political, and legal history at their most compelling, "The Straight State" explores how regulation transformed the regulated: in drawing boundaries around national citizenship, the state helped to define the very meaning of homosexuality in America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691135984 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
xxviii, 688 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
  • Unite and fight
  • "Sweet land of liberty"
  • "Pressure, more pressure and still more pressure"
  • "1776 for the Negro"
  • Hearts and minds
  • "Balance of power"
  • "No place for Colored"
  • "God have pity on such a city"
  • "No right more elemental"
  • Freedom now
  • "New frontier"
  • "Fires of frustration and discord"
  • "Long hot summers'
  • "Unconditional war"
  • "The Black man's land"
  • "It's not the bus, it's us"
  • "Fighting for our lives."
Sweet Land of Liberty is an epic, revelatory account of the abiding quest for justice in states from Illinois to New York, and of how the intense northern struggle differed from and was inspired by the fight down South.
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
404 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- MISCEGENATION LAW AND CONSTITUTIONAL EQUALITY, 1863-1883-- 1. Engendering Miscegenation-- 2. Sexualizing Miscegenation Law-- MISCEGENATION LAW AND RACE CLASSIFICATION, 1860-1948-- 3. Configuring Race in the American West-- 4. The Facts of Race in the Courtroom-- 5. Seeing Like a Racial State-- MISCEGENATION LAW AND ITS OPPONENTS, 1913-1963-- 6. Between a Rock and a Hard Place-- 7. Interracial Marriage as a Natural Right-- MISCEGENATION LAW, CIVIL RIGHTS, AND COLORBLINDNESS, 1964-2000-- 8. Interracial Marriage as a Civil Right-- 9. The Politics of Colorblindness.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195094633 20160528
A long-awaited history that promises to dramatically change our understanding of race in America, What Comes Naturally traces the origins, spread, and demise of miscegenation laws in the United States - laws that banned interracial marriage and sex, most often between whites and members of other races. Peggy Pascoe demonstrates how these laws were enacted and applied not just in the South but throughout most of the country, in the West, the North, and the Midwest. Beginning in the Reconstruction era, when the term miscegenation first was coined, she traces the creation of a racial hierarchy that bolstered white supremacy and banned the marriage of Whites to Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and American Indians as well as the marriage of Whites to Blacks. She ends not simply with the landmark 1967 case of Loving v. Virginia, in which the Supreme Court finally struck down miscegenation laws throughout the country, but looks at the implications of ideas of colorblindness that replaced them. What Comes Naturally is both accessible to the general reader and informative to the specialist, a rare feat for an original work of history based on archival research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195094633 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
xx, 377 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures and Illustrations xi List of Tables xiii Acknowledgments xv Note on Language and Terminology xix Introduction Illegal Aliens: A Problem of Law and History 1 PART I: THE REGIME OF QUOTAS AND PAPERS 15 One The Johnson-Reed Act of 1924 and the Reconstruction of Race in Immigration Law 21 Two Deportation Policy and the Making and Unmaking of Illegal Aliens 56 PART II: MIGRANTS AT THE MARGINS OF LAW AND NATION 91 Three From Colonial Subject to Undesirable Alien: Filipino Migration in the Invisible Empire 96 Four Braceros, "Wetbacks, " and the National Boundaries of Class 127 PART III: WAR, NATIONALISM, AND ALIEN CITIZENSHIP 167 Five The World War II Internment of Japanese Americans and the Citizenship Renunciation Cases 175 Six The Cold War Chinese Immigration Crisis and the Confession Cases 202 PART IV: PLURALISM AND NATIONALISM IN POST-WORLD WAR II IMMIGRATION REFORM 225 Seven The Liberal Critique and Reform of Immigration Policy 227 Epilogue 265 Appendix 271 Notes 275 Archival and Other Primary Sources 357 Index 369.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691124292 20160528
This book traces the origins of the "illegal alien" in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy - a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century. Mae Ngai offers a close reading of the legal regime of restriction that commenced in the 1920s - its statutory architecture, judicial genealogies, administrative enforcement, differential treatment of European and non-European migrants, and long-term effects. In well-drawn historical portraits, Ngai peoples her study with the Filipinos, Mexicans, Japanese, and Chinese who comprised, variously, illegal aliens, alien citizens, colonial subjects, and imported contract workers.She shows that immigration restriction, particularly national-origin and numerical quotas, re-mapped the nation both by creating new categories of racial difference and by emphasizing as never before the nation's contiguous land borders and their patrol. This yielded the "illegal alien, " a new legal and political subject whose inclusion in the nation was a social reality but a legal impossibility - a subject without rights and excluded from citizenship. Questions of fundamental legal status created new challenges for liberal democratic society and have directly informed the politics of multiculturalism and national belonging in our time. Ngai's analysis is based on extensive archival research, including previously unstudied records of the U.S. Border Patrol and Immigration and Naturalization Service. Contributing to American history, legal history, and ethnic studies, "Impossible Subjects" is a major reconsideration of U.S. immigration in the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691124292 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
ix, 280 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Immigrating to the United States, Italians, like all others arriving on America's shores, were made to fill out a standardized immigration form. In the box for race, they faced several choices: Italian, Southern Italian, Mediterranean, or Silician. On the line requesting information on color, they wrote simply "white." This identification had profound implications for Italians, as Thomas A. Guglielmo demonstrates in this prize-winning book. While many suffered from racial prejudice and discrimination, they were nonetheless viewed as white on arrival in the corridors of American power-from judges to journalists, from organized labor to politicians, from race scientists to realtors. Taking the mass Italian immigration of the late 19th century as his starting point, Guglielmo focuses on how perceptions of Italians' race and color were shaped in one of America's great centers of immigration and labor, Chicago. His account skillfully weaves the major events of Chicago immigrant history-the Chicago Color Riot of 1919, the rise of Italian organized crime, the rise of fascism, and the Italian-Ethiopian War of 1935-36-into the story of how Italians approached, learned, and lived race. By tracking their evolving position in the city's racial hierarchy, Guglielmo reveals the impact of racial classification-both formal and social-on immigrants' abilities to acquire homes and jobs, start families, and gain opportunities in America. Carefully drawing the distinction between race and color, Guglielmo argues that whiteness proved Italians' most valuable asset for making it in America. Even so, Italians were reluctant to identify themselves explicitly as white until World War II. By separating examples of discrimination against Italians from the economic and social advantages they accrued from their acceptance as whites, Guglielmo counters the claims of many ethnic Americans that hard work alone enabled their extraordinary success, especially when compared to non-white groups whose upward mobility languished. A compelling story, White on Arrival contains profound implications for our understanding of race and ethnic acculturation in the United States, as well as of the rich and nuanced relationship between immigration and urban history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195155433 20160528
Immigrating to the United States, Italians, like all others arriving on America's shores, were made to fill out a standardized immigration form. In the box for race, they faced two choices: North Italian or South Italian. On the line requesting information on color, they wrote simply "white." By World War II, the only option they had for race and color questions was "white." This identification is suggestive of the many ways in which Italians became white on arrival in the United States, as Thomas A. Guglielmo demonstrates in this prize-winning book. While many suffered from racial prejudice and discrimination, they were nonetheless viewed as white, with all the privileges this color classification bestowed, in the corridors of American power--from judges to journalists, from organized labor to politicians, from race scientists to realtors. Taking the mass Italian immigration of the late 19th century as his starting point and drawing on dozens of oral histories and a diverse array of primary sources in English and Italian, Guglielmo focuses on how perceptions of Italians' race and color were shaped in one of America's great centers of immigration and labor, Chicago. His account skillfully weaves together the major events of Chicago immigrant history--the "Chicago Color Riot" of 1919, the rise of Italian organized crime, and the rise of industrial unionism--with national and international events--such as the rise of fascism and the Italian-Ethiopian War of 1935-36--to present the story of how Italians approached, learned, and lived race. By tracking their evolving position in the city's racial hierarchy, Guglielmo reveals the impact of racial classification--both formal and informal--on immigrants' abilities to acquire homes and jobs, start families, and gain opportunities in America. Carefully drawing the distinction between race and color, Guglielmo argues that whiteness proved Italians' most valuable asset for making it in America. Even so, Italians were reluctant to identify themselves explicitly as white until World War II. By separating examples of discrimination against Italians from the economic and social advantages they accrued from their acceptance as whites, Guglielmo counters the claims of many ethnic Americans that hard work alone enabled their extraordinary success, especially when compared to non-white groups whose upward mobility languished. A compelling story, White on Arrival contains profound implications for our understanding of race and ethnic acculturation in the United States, as well as twentieth-century immigration, urban, and political history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195178029 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
634 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Paris, 1900 - world of iron, explaining social politics-- the Atlantic world - landscapes, progressive politics-- twilight of laissez-faire - natural acts and social desires, professing economics-- the self-owned city - the collectivism of urban life, cities on a hill-- civic ambitions - private property, public designs, "city planning in justice to the working population"-- the wage earners' risks - workingmen's insurance, fields of interest-- war collectivism - Europe, 1914, society "more or less molten"-- rural reconstruction - cooperative farming, island communities-- the machine age - the American invasion of Europe, the politics of modernism-- new deal - the intellectual economy of catastrophe, solidarity imagined-- London, 1942 - the plan to abolish want, the phoenix of exceptionalism.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674051317 20160527
"The most belated of nations", Theodore Roosevelt called his country during the workmen's compensation fight in 1907. Earlier reformers, progressives of his day, and later New Dealers lamented the nation's resistance to models abroad for correctives to the backwardness of American social politics. This text is an account of the vibrant international network that they constructed - so often obscured by notions of American exceptionalism - and of its profound impact on the USA from the 1870s through to 1945. On a narrative canvas that sweeps across Europe and the United States, Daniel Rodgers retells the story of the classic era efforts to repair the damages of unbridled capitalism. He reveals the forgotten international roots of such innovations as city planning, rural co-operatives, modernist architecture for public housing, and social insurance, among other reforms. From small beginnings to reconstructions of the new great cities and rural life, and to the wide-ranging mechanics of social security for working people, Rodgers finds the interconnections, adaptations, exchanges, and even rivalries in the Atlantic region's social planning. He uncovers the immense diffusion of talent, ideas, and action that were breathtaking in their range and impact.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674051317 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
xi, 478 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-351F-01
Book
367 p.
Twentieth-century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between variant cultures in American history. Yet this study is among the first to examine the relationship between ethnicity and identity among the largest immigrant group to that city. By focusing on Mexican immigrants to Los Angeles from 1900 to 1945, George J. Sanchez explores the process by which temporary sojourners altered their orientation to that of permanent residents, thereby laying the foundation for a new Mexican-American culture. Analysing not only formal programs aimed at these newcomers by the United States and Mexico, but also the world created by these immigrants through family networks, religious practice, musical entertainment, and work ethics, Sanchez uncovers the creative ways Mexicans adapted their culture to life in the United States. When a formal repatriation campaign pushed thousands to return to Mexico, those remaining in Los Angeles launched new campaigns to gain civil rights as ethnic Americans through labor unions and New Deal politics. The immigrant generation, therefore, laid the groundwork for the emerging Mexican-American identity of their children.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195069907 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
AFRICAAM-255-01, AMSTUD-255D-01, CSRE-255D-01, HISTORY-255D-01, HISTORY-355D-01, HISTORY-351F-01