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Book
xxxiv, 246 pages : ill., maps ; 24 cm
  • Preface Introduction 1. Medicine in the Age of Commerce: 1600-1800 2. Plants, Medicine and Empire 3. Medicine and the Colonial Armed Forces 4. Colonialism, Climate and Race 5. Imperialism and the Globalization of Disease 6. Western Medicine in Colonial India 7. Medicine and the Colonization of Africa 8. Imperialism and Tropical Medicine 9. Bacteriology and the Civilizing Mission 10. Colonialism and Traditional Medicines Conclusion: The Colonial Legacies of Global Health.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230276369 20160613
The history of modern medicine is inseparable from the history of imperialism. Medicine and Empire provides an introduction to this shared history - spanning three centuries and covering British, French and Spanish imperial histories in Africa, Asia and America. Exploring the major developments in European medicine from the seventeenth century to the mid-twentieth century, Pratik Chakrabarti shows that the major developments in European medicine had a colonial counterpart and were closely intertwined with European activities overseas: * the increasing influence of natural history on medicine * the growth of European drug markets * the rise of surgeons in status * ideas of race and racism * advancements in sanitation and public health * the expansion of the modern quarantine system * the emergence of Germ theory and global vaccination campaigns. Drawing on recent scholarship and primary texts, this book narrates a mutually constitutive history in which medicine was both a 'tool' and a product of imperialism, and provides an original, accessible insight into the deep historical roots of the problems that plague global health today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230276369 20160613
Green Library
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01
Book
xviii, 306 pages ; 24 cm
It is no exaggeration to say that the Hankey, a small British ship that circled the Atlantic in 1792 and 1793, transformed the history of the Atlantic world. This extraordinary book uncovers the long-forgotten story of the Hankey, from its altruistic beginnings to its disastrous end, and describes the ship's fateful impact upon people from West Africa to Philadelphia, Haiti to London. Billy G. Smith chased the story of the Hankey from archive to archive across several continents, and he now brings back to light a saga that continues to haunt the modern world. It began with a group of high-minded British colonists who planned to establish a colony free of slavery in West Africa. With the colony failing, the ship set sail for the Caribbean and then North America, carrying, as it turned out, mosquitoes infected with yellow fever. The resulting pandemic as the Hankey traveled from one port to the next was catastrophic. In the United States, tens of thousands died in Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Charleston. The few survivors on the Hankey eventually limped back to London, hopes dashed and numbers decimated. Smith links the voyage and its deadly cargo to some of the most significant events of the era--the success of the Haitian slave revolution, Napoleon's decision to sell the Louisiana Territory, a change in the geopolitical situation of the new United States--and spins a riveting tale of unintended consequences and the legacy of slavery that will not die.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300194524 20160612
Green Library
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01
Book
xviii, 371 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. Setting the Scene: 1. The argument: mosquito determinism and its limits-- 2. Atlantic empires and Caribbean ecology-- 3. Deadly fevers, deadly doctors-- Part II. Imperial Mosquitoes: 4. From Recife to Kourou: yellow fever takes hold, 1620-1764-- 5. Cartagena and Havana: yellow fever rampant-- Part III. Revolutionary Mosquitoes: 6. Lord Cornwallis vs. anopheles quadrimaculatus, 1780-1781-- 7. Revolutionary fevers: Haiti, New Granada, and Cuba, 1790-1898-- 8. Epilogue: vector and virus vanquished.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521452861 20160528
This book explores the links among ecology, disease, and international politics in the context of the Greater Caribbean - the landscapes lying between Surinam and the Chesapeake - in the seventeenth through early twentieth centuries. Ecological changes made these landscapes especially suitable for the vector mosquitoes of yellow fever and malaria, and these diseases wrought systematic havoc among armies and would-be settlers. Because yellow fever confers immunity on survivors of the disease, and because malaria confers resistance, these diseases played partisan roles in the struggles for empire and revolution, attacking some populations more severely than others. In particular, yellow fever and malaria attacked newcomers to the region, which helped keep the Spanish Empire Spanish in the face of predatory rivals in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. In the late eighteenth and through the nineteenth century, these diseases helped revolutions to succeed by decimating forces sent out from Europe to prevent them.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521452861 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01
Book
xiv, 176 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Justinian's Plague, the Black Death, the Great Plague, cholera, influenza, tuberculosis, and AIDS - these diseases and others have devastated human lives and society for generations, decimating populations, creating panic, and wrecking social and economic infrastructure. In "Epidemics Laid Low" epidemiologist and historian Patrice Bourdelais analyzes the history of disease epidemics in Europe from the Middle Ages to the present. This captivating account describes how populations respond to crises of disease and how authorities deal with the devastation afterward. Bourdelais discusses the successes of northern European countries in fighting and controlling infectious diseases and emphasizes, by comparison, the failures of the countries in the south. He links success to several factors: ideology of progress, economic development, popular demands to improve public health, and investment in medical research. Bourdelais studies the social consequences of these policies, the changes in the representation of epidemics, the behaviors of populations, and heightened tensions between advocates of individual freedom and those of collective interest. Epidemics continue to threaten us today. What do our responses to these threats say about our priorities? Will the security of public health remain a privilege of a few powerful countries or will poorer countries benefit from the efforts of the rich to prevent the spread of disease inside their own borders?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801882944 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01
Book
340 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This text meditates on the contrasts between the human body described in classical Greek medicine and the body as envisaged by physicians in ancient China. It asks how this most basic of human realities came to be conceived by two sophisticated civilizations in radically diverging ways. I t seeks answers in topics such as the history of tactile knowledge, the relationship between the ways of seeing and ways of listening, and the evolution of blood-letting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780942299885 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01
Book
viii, 241 p.; 24 cm.
  • Toward a history of the body-- Johann Storch and women's complaints-- medical practice in Eisenach-- the perception of the body.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674954038 20160527
Despite historians' interest in cultural representations of the body, we tend to think of human anatomy and physiology as scientific fact, not historical artifact. In this study Barbara Duden asserts that the most basic biological and medical teams that we use to describe our own bodies - male or female, healthy or sick - are indeed cultural constructions. She sets out to cross the traditional boundary between history and nature by gaining access to the inner existence of a group of women who lived in bodies very different from our own. These women were the patients of Johann Storch, a physician who lives and worked in the town of Eisenach, Germany, during the first half of the 18th century. Storch meticulously documented the medical histories of approximately 1800 women of all ages and social stations, often in their own words. This rich and unique record of complaints, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments reveals an alien understanding of the female body and its function. Physical processes - digestion, menstruation, pregnancy - were not associated with discrete internal organs. Blood ebbed and flowed rather than circulated; pregnancy did not exist until quickening; menses could be discharged in the form of tears. Physical examination was not necessary to medical care, and in many cases the doctor had no direct contact with his patient. Barbara Duden uses his material to reanimates the female body that Johann Storch treated and that his patients inhabited, showing that its structure, function and meaning - and therefore those of our own bodies - belong to history as well as to nature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674954038 20160527
Green Library, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01
Book
xiv, 250 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Western Europe supported a highly developed and diverse medical community in the late medieval and early Renaissance periods. In her absorbing history of this complex era in medicine, Siraisi explores the inner workings of the medical community and illustrates the connections of medicine to both natural philosophy and technical skills.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226761305 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
HISTORY-242F-01, HISTORY-342F-01