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Book
xxi, 448 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- Part I. Consuming Print: Introduction-- 1. The ownership of cheap print-- 2. The accessibility of print-- 3. Readers, reception and the authority of print-- Part II. Following Parliament: Introduction-- 4. Analysing parliament and its problems-- 5. Access to parliament-- 6. Monitoring personalities and performance-- Part III. Taking Part: Introduction-- 7. Authors, printing and participation-- 8. Print and petitioning-- 9. Print and lobbying-- 10. Printing, mass mobilisation and protesting-- 11. Holding representatives to account-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107044425 20160612
This is a major reassessment of the communications revolution of the seventeenth century. Using a wealth of archival evidence and the considerable output of the press, Jason Peacey demonstrates how new media - from ballads to pamphlets and newspapers - transformed the English public's ability to understand and participate in national political life. He analyses how contemporaries responded to political events as consumers of print; explores what they were able to learn about national politics; and examines how they developed the ability to appropriate a variety of print genres in order to participate in novel ways. Amid structural change and conjunctural upheaval, he argues that there occurred a dramatic re-shaping of the political nation, as citizens from all walks of life developed new habits and practices for engaging in daily political life, and for protecting and advancing their interests. This ultimately involved experience-led attempts to rethink the nature of representation and accountability.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107044425 20160612
Green Library
HISTORY-233C-01, HISTORY-333C-01
Book
xiii, 274 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction -- PART I -- 2. Clearing the Way: Challenges and Agenda -- 3. Moulding Instruments of Reform: Men and Machinery -- 4. Propaganda Wars -- PART II -- 5. Sins against God: Swearing and the Sabbath -- 6. The Puritan Parish -- 7. Puritans and Sex -- 8. Drink and Disorder -- 9. Worldly Pleasures: Dress, Music, Dancing, Art -- 10. Worldly Pleasures: Plays, Shows, Sports -- PART III -- 11. Local contexts -- 12. Godly rule: Exeter -- 13. Conclusion -- Manuscript Sources -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199641789 20160609
Following the execution of the king in 1649, the new Commonwealth and then Oliver Cromwell set out to drive forward a puritan reformation of manners. They wanted to reform the church and its services, enforce the Sabbath, suppress Christmas, and spread the gospel. They sought to impose a stern moral discipline to regulate and reform sexual behaviour, drinking practices, language, dress, and leisure activities ranging from music and plays to football. England's Culture Wars explores how far this agenda could be enforced, especially in urban communities which offered the greatest potential to build a godly civic commonwealth. How far were local magistrates and ministers willing to cooperate, and what coercive powers did the regime possess to silence or remove dissidents? How far did the reformers themselves wish to go, and how did they reconcile godly reformation with the demands of decency and civility? Music and dancing lived on, in genteel contexts, early opera replaced the plays now forbidden, and puritans themselves were often fond of hunting and hawking. Bernard Capp explores the propaganda wars waged in press and pulpit, how energetically reformation was pursued, and how much or little was achieved. Many recent historians have dismissed interregnum reformation as a failure. He demonstrates that while the reforming drive varied enormously from place to place, its impact could be powerful. The book is therefore structured in three parts: setting out the reform agenda and challenges, surveying general issues and patterns, and finally offering a number of representative case-studies. It draws on a wide range of sources, including local and central government records, judicial records, pamphlets, sermons, newspapers, diaries, letters, and memoirs; and demonstrates how court records by themselves give us only a very limited picture of what was happening on the ground.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199641789 20160609
Green Library
HISTORY-233C-01, HISTORY-333C-01
Book
vi, 181 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Contents. Acknowledgements. Part 1: Introduction: Gender, Power and Politics in Early Modern England Part 2. Women and War Part3: Manhood and Civil War Part 4: Bodies, Families, Sex: using gender, imagining politics. Conclusion. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415214919 20160607
In this fascinating and unique study, Ann Hughes examines how the experience of civil war in seventeenth-century England affected the roles of women and men in politics and society; and how conventional concepts of masculinity and femininity were called into question by the war and the trial and execution of an anointed King. Ann Hughes combines discussion of the activities of women in the religious and political upheavals of the revolution, with a pioneering analysis of how male political identities were fractured by civil war. Traditional parallels and analogies between marriage, the family and the state were shaken, and rival understandings of sexuality, manliness, effeminacy and womanliness were deployed in political debate. In a historiography dominated by military or political approaches, Gender and the English Revolution reveals the importance of gender in understanding the events in England during the 1640s and 1650s. It will be an essential resource for anyone interested in women's history, feminism, gender or British History.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415214919 20160607
Green Library
HISTORY-233C-01, HISTORY-333C-01
Book
xxvi, 757 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.
The sequence of civil wars that ripped England apart in the seventeenth century was the single most traumatic event in this country between the medieval Black Death and the two world wars. Indeed, it is likely that a greater percentage of the population were killed in the civil wars than in the First World War. This sense of overwhelming trauma gives this major new history its title: "God's Fury, England's Fire". The name of a pamphlet written after the king's surrender, it sums up the widespread feeling within England that the seemingly endless nightmare that had destroyed families, towns and livelihoods was ordained by a vengeful God - that the people of England had sinned and were now being punished.As with all civil wars, however, "God's Fury" could support or destroy either side in the conflict. Was God angry at Charles I for failing to support the true, protestant, religion and refusing to work with Parliament? Or was God angry with those who had dared challenge His anointed Sovereign? Michael Braddick's remarkable book gives the reader a vivid and enduring sense both of what it was like to live through events of uncontrollable violence and what really animated the different sides.The killing of Charles I and the declaration of a republic - events which even now seem in an English context utterly astounding - were by no means the only outcomes, and Braddick brilliantly describes the twists and turns that led to the most radical solutions of all to the country's political implosion. He also describes very effectively the influence of events in Scotland, Ireland and the European mainland on the conflict in England. "God's Fury, England's Fire" allows readers to understand once more the events that have so fundamentally marked this country and which still resonate centuries after their bloody ending.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780713996326 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-233C-01, HISTORY-333C-01
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-233C-01, HISTORY-333C-01
Book
351 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-233C-01, HISTORY-333C-01