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Book
436 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Peace and power in display
  • Selling the Congress
  • Salon networks
  • Negotiating religion
  • Europe in the wider world
  • Between reaction and reform
  • Poland, Saxony, and the crucible of diplomacy
  • Conclusion.
Convened following Napoleon s defeat in 1814, the Congress of Vienna is remembered as much for the pageantry of the royals and elites who gathered there as for the landmark diplomatic agreements they brokered. Historians have nevertheless generally dismissed these spectacular festivities as window dressing when compared with the serious, behind-the-scenes maneuverings of sovereigns and statesmen. Brian Vick finds this conventional view shortsighted, seeing these instead as two interconnected dimensions of politics. Examining them together yields a more complete picture of how one of the most important diplomatic summits in history managed to redraw the map of Europe and the international system of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Congress of Vienna" investigates the Vienna Congress within a broad framework of influence networks that included unofficial opinion-shapers of all kinds, both men and women: artists and composers, entrepreneurs and writers, hosts and attendees of fashionable salons. In addition to high-profile negotiation and diplomatic wrangling over the post-Napoleonic fates of Germany, Italy, and Poland, Vick brings into focus other understudied yet significant issues: the African slave trade, Jewish rights, and relations with Islamic powers such as the Ottoman Empire and Barbary Corsairs. Challenging the usual portrayal of a reactionary Congress obsessed with rolling back Napoleon s liberal reforms, Vick demonstrates that the Congress s promotion of limited constitutionalism, respect for religious and nationality rights, and humanitarian interventions was influenced as much by liberal currents as by conservative ones.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674729711 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
xiii, 343 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Austrian Empire ranked third among the world's oil-producing states. By 1918, the Central Powers did not have enough oil to maintain a modern military. How and why did the promise of oil fail Galicia (the province producing the oil) and the empire? Alison Frank traces the interaction of technology, nationalist rhetoric, social tensions, provincial politics, and entrepreneurial vision in shaping the Galician oil industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674018877 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
xi, 384 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
366 p., with [16] p. of plates : ill., map ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
xiii, 271 p. : 1 map ; 25 cm.
Offering a social history of the division of the German Empire in 1871, this study argues that Protestants and Catholics lived in different worlds, separated by a boundary of culture. The author explores the local and national dimensions of this conflict.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691036243 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
viii, 150 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Editors Preface. Acknowledgements. 1. Definitions. 2. Culture in Agrarian Society. 3. Industrial Society. 4. The Transition to an Age of Nationalism. 5. What is a Nation? 6. Social Entropy and Equality in Industrial Society. 7. A Typology of Nationalisms. 8. The Future of Nationalism. 9. Nationalism and Ideology. 10. Conclusion. Select Bibliography. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780631130888 20160527
Nationalism is one of the most powerful forces in the modern world, yet it is surprisingly little studied and only imperfectly understood, either by its adherents or its opponents. Its irruption into the modern world is often explained as a resurgence of primitive, atavistic instincts, or as a delusion fostered by a few theoreticians, politicians or propagandists.The present volume interprets nationalism in terms of its social roots, which it locates in industrial social organization. A society that aims for affluence and economic growth, Professor Gellner argues, depends on innovation, occupational mobility, mass media, universal literacy, and education in a shared, standard idiom. Taken together these transform the relationship between culture and the state. The functioning of the society depends on an all-embracing educational system, tied to one culture and protected by a state identified with that culture. The principle one state, one culture makes itself felt, and political units which do not conform to it feel the strain in the form of nationalist activity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780631130888 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
xxiv, 620 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
xv, 615 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
xi, 473 p. map. 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01
Book
282 p. maps. 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-331B-01