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Book
xiv, 344 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Graz
  • Estland
  • St. Petersburg, Manchuria, St. Petersburg
  • Beyond the Baikal
  • The Black Dragon River
  • Kobdo
  • Warland
  • The ataman's domain
  • Urga
  • Kiakhta
  • Red Siberia.
"Baron Roman Fedorovich von Ungern-Sternberg (1885-1921) was a Baltic German aristocrat and tsarist military officer who fought against the Bolsheviks in Eastern Siberia during the Russian Civil War. From there he established himself as the de facto warlord of Outer Mongolia, the base for a fantastical plan to restore the Russian and Chinese empires, which then ended with his capture and execution by the Red Army as the war drew to a close. In The Baron's Cloak, Willard Sunderland tells the epic story of the Russian Empire's final decades through the arc of the Baron's life, which spanned the vast reaches of Eurasia. Tracking Ungern's movements, he transits through the Empire's multinational borderlands, where the country bumped up against three other doomed empires, the Habsburg, Ottoman, and Qing, and where the violence unleashed by war, revolution, and imperial collapse was particularly vicious ... Sunderland recreates Ungern's far-flung life and uses it to tell a compelling and original tale of imperial success and failure in a momentous time"-- Publisher's Web site.
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
xii, 287 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Preface -- Introduction: Imperial Challenge -- 1. The Outbreak of War and the Transformation of the Borderlands -- 2. The Front Migrates -- 3. Remobilizing the Military: Combat Innovation, POWs, and Forced Labor -- 4. Remobilizing Society: Nurses, Doctors, and Social Control -- 5. Revolution -- 6. Decolonization -- Conclusion: Imperial Apocalypse -- Works Cited.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199642052 20160616
Imperial Apocalypse describes the collapse of the Russian Empire during World War One. Drawing material from nine different archives and hundreds of published sources, this study ties together state failure, military violence, and decolonization in a single story. Joshua Sanborn excavates the individual lives of soldiers, doctors, nurses, politicians, and civilians caught up in the global conflict along the way, creating a narrative that is both humane and conceptually rich. The volume opens by laying out the theoretical relationship between state failure, social collapse, and decolonization, and then moves chronologically from the Balkan Wars of 1912-13 through the fierce battles and massive human dislocations of 1914-16 to the final collapse of the empire in the midst of revolution in 1917-18. Imperial Apocalypse is the first major study which treats the demise of the Russian Empire as part of the twentieth-century phenomenon of modern decolonization, and provides a readable account of military activity and political change throughout this turbulent period of war and revolution. Sanborn argues that the sudden rise of groups seeking national self-determination in the borderlands of the empire was the consequence of state failure, not its cause. At the same time, he shows how the destruction of state institutions and the spread of violence from the front to the rear led to a collapse of traditional social bonds and the emergence of a new, more dangerous, and more militant political atmosphere.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199642052 20160616
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
xii, 324 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: History from the Deep Freeze
  • The Strategic Imperative in 1914
  • It Takes Two to Tango : The July Crisis
  • Russia's War : The Opening Round
  • Turkey's Turn
  • The Russians and Gallipoli
  • Russia and the Armenians
  • The Russians in Persia
  • Partitioning the Ottoman Empire
  • 1917 : The Tsarist Empire at Its Zenith
  • Conclusion: The October Revolution and Historical Amnesia.
The catastrophe of the First World War, and the destruction, revolution, and enduring hostilities it wrought, make the issue of its origins a perennial puzzle. Since World War II, Germany has been viewed as the primary culprit. Now, in a major reinterpretation of the conflict, Sean McMeekin rejects the standard notions of the war's beginning as either a Germano-Austrian preemptive strike or a "tragedy of miscalculation." Instead, he proposes that the key to the outbreak of violence lies in St. Petersburg. It was Russian statesmen who unleashed the war through conscious policy decisions based on imperial ambitions in the Near East. Unlike their civilian counterparts in Berlin, who would have preferred to localize the Austro-Serbian conflict, Russian leaders desired a more general war so long as British participation was assured. The war of 1914 was launched at a propitious moment for harnessing the might of Britain and France to neutralize the German threat to Russia's goal: partitioning the Ottoman Empire to ensure control of the Straits between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. Nearly a century has passed since the guns fell silent on the western front. But in the lands of the former Ottoman Empire, World War I smolders still. Sunnis and Shiites, Arabs and Jews, and other regional antagonists continue fighting over the last scraps of the Ottoman inheritance. As we seek to make sense of these conflicts, McMeekin's powerful expose of Russia's aims in the First World War will illuminate our understanding of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674062108 20160607
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
xiv, 303 p., [21] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The high politics of anarchy and competition-- 2. Troubles in Anatolia: imperial insecurities and the transformation of borderland politics-- 3. Visions of vulnerability: the politics of Muslims, revolutionaries, and defectors-- 4. Out of the pan, into the fire: empires at war-- 5. Remastering Anatolia: rending nations, rending empires-- 6. Brest-Litovsk and the opening of the Caucasus-- 7. Forced to be free: the geopolitics of independence in the Transcaucasus-- 8. Racing against time-- Epilogue.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521149167 20160605
The break-up of the Ottoman empire and the disintegration of the Russian empire were watershed events in modern history. The unravelling of these empires was both cause and consequence of World War I and resulted in the deaths of millions. It irrevocably changed the landscape of the Middle East and Eurasia and reverberates to this day in conflicts throughout the Caucasus and Middle East. Shattering Empires draws on extensive research in the Ottoman and Russian archives to tell the story of the rivalry and collapse of two great empires. Overturning accounts that portray their clash as one of conflicting nationalisms, this pioneering study argues that geopolitical competition and the emergence of a new global interstate order provide the key to understanding the course of history in the Ottoman-Russian borderlands in the twentieth century. It will appeal to those interested in Middle Eastern, Russian, and Eurasian history, international relations, ethnic conflict, and World War I.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521149167 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
viii, 256 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Security and expansion: the great powers and geopolitics, 1871-1914-- 3. The military, war and international politics-- 4. Public opinion and international relations-- 5. The world economy and international politics before 1914-- 6. The July crisis-- 7. Conclusion-- Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521886338 20160604
Providing a new interpretation of the origins of the First World War, this textbook synthesises recent scholarship and introduces the major historiographical and political debates surrounding the outbreak of the war. William Mulligan argues that the war was a far from inevitable outcome of international politics in the early twentieth century and suggests instead that there were powerful forces operating in favour of the maintenance of peace. His fresh perspective on the pre-war international system takes account of new approaches to the study of international politics since the end of the Cold War and the acceleration of globalisation. Thematic chapters examine key issues, including the military, public opinion, economics, diplomacy and geopolitics, and analyse relations between the great powers, the role of smaller states, the disintegrating empires and the July crisis. This compelling account will significantly revise our understanding of diplomacy, political culture, and economic history from 1870 to 1914.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521886338 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
xii, 275 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The summer of 1914: the Hapsburg empire meets Serbian warfare-- 2. Eradicating national politics in occupied Serbia-- 3. Legal severity, international law, and the tottering empire in occupied Serbia-- 4. Food as salvation: food supply, the monarchy, and Serbia, 1916-1918-- 5. A levee en masse nation no more? Guerilla war in Hapsburg Serbia.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book examines the Habsburg Army's occupation of Serbia from 1914 through 1918. This occupation ran along a distinctly European-centered trajectory radically different from other great power colonial projects or occupations during the 20th century. Unlike these projects and occupations, the Habsburg Army sought to denationalize and depoliticize Serbia, to gradually reduce the occupation's violence, and to fully integrate the country into the Empire. These aims stemmed from 19th-century conservative and monarchical convictions that compelled the Army to operate under broad legal and civilizational constraints. Gumz's research provides a counterpoint to interpretations of the First World War that emphasize the centrality of racially inflected, Darwinist worldviews in the war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Video
1 videodisc (114 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
A French World War I POW is held by Erich von Stroheim's German captain. A rousing prison-escape adventure and an exemplar of the 1930's poetic realist movement.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
xii, 259 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • List of Figures, Tables and Charts Acknowledgements List of Abbreviations page Introduction...1 Clio's Veil...1 Historiographic Contexts...5 1 Becoming Prisoners of War...45 The Creation of the Austro-Hungarian POW Problem ...45 Austro-Hungarian POWs in Russia: A Quantitative Overview...50 Becoming POWs: The View from Below...61 2 The Hague Convention and the Treatment of POWs: Mission and Omissions...96 Prisoner of War Camps in World War I and the 'Barbaric' Twentieth Century...96 The Legal Framework...99 The 'Prototype' Thesis ...112 3 The Treatment of POWs in Russia...125 Prisoner of War Camps and other Places of Internment ...127 Living Conditions in POW Camps...137 Prisoners of War as Labor...152 Propaganda and Recruitment Among the Prisoners...163 The Treatment of POWs and the Perception of World War I ...172 4 In Search of the 'Good and Loyal Prisoner': The Austro-Hungarian Censorship and the POWs...191 Patriotism in a Multi-National State...191 The Austro-Hungarian POW Censorship...194 Austro-Hungarian POWs, the Censorship and the Issue of Loyalty...210 5 The Emperor's Clothes: The Austro-Hungarian POW Relief Effort...232 POW Relief in World War I: The Uniqueness of the Eastern Front ...232 The Austro-Hungarian POW Material Relief...237 The Austro-Hungarian Nurses...247 6 Imperial Identities and Personal Concerns: The Perspective of the Prisoners...276 Repatriation and the Repatriation System (Heimkehrwesen)...276 Prisoner of War Letters and their Usefulness as a Historical Source...283 The Relief Effort: The Prisoners' Perspective ...285 Epilogue: Captivity in the Collective Remembrance of the Great War @ The Emergence of a Commemorative Pecking Order...320 Bibliography...335 Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781859735787 20160528
Joint Winner of Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History 2001, London. Winner of Talmon Prize, Israel, awarded by the Israeli Academy of Sciences. Although it was one of the most common experiences of combatants in World War I, captivity has received only a marginal place in the collective memory of the Great War and has seemed unimportant compared with the experiences of soldiers on the Western Front. Yet this book, focusing on POWs on the Eastern Front, reveals a different picture of the War and the human misery it produced. During four years of fighting, approximately 8.5 million soldiers were taken captive, of whom nearly 2.8 million were Austro-Hungarians. This book is the first to consider in-depth the experiences of these prisoners during their period of incarceration. How were POWs treated in Russia? What was the relationship between prisoners and their home state? How were concepts of patriotism and loyalty employed and understood? Drawing extensively on original letters and diaries, Rachamimov answers these and other searching questions. In the process, major omissions in previous historiography are addressed. Anyone wishing to have a rounded history of the Great War will find this book fills a major gap.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781859735787 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
x, 273 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
Ethnic Nationalism and the Fall of Empire examines the critical dilemmas of nationalist politics in the first world war. The book focuses on a selection of case-studies drawn from events in the Habsburg, Romanov and Ottoman Empires, as well as the nation-states that arose form their break-up during, and in the aftermath of the First World War. It proposes that the events of the war itself catapulted nationalist movements into positions of authority well before the necessary cultural and institutional framework had had time to develop. The resulting crisis of political modernisation has reemerged in the late twentieth century and has been a fundamental threat to global stability. Ethnic Nationalism and the Fall of Empire includes examination of: the role of intelligentsias the effect of WW1 on the peoples of multi ethnic empires the conflicts over how to define the boundaries of nationhood in the new post-war polities the role of institutional continuity and the old elites in the evolution of the new nation states.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415242295 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Video
1 videodisc (114 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
During World War I, three captured French pilots have an uneasy relationship with their German commandant.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01
Book
229 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-227D-01, HISTORY-327D-01, REES-227-01, REES-327-01