Search results

RSS feed for this result

7 results

Video
1 videodisc (96 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
Contains disc 2 of the three disc special ed. set from Andrzej Wajda.
Media & Microtext Center
FEMGEN-227-01, HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01
Video
1 videodisc (92 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
Begins on the 56th day of the Warsaw Uprising against the Nazis during World War II. A ragtag group of trained and untrained Resistance fighters hold on to the front line. They try to live a relatively normal life, and even find time to play the piano. They achieve small victories, but must retreat into the sewers in order to survive.
Media & Microtext Center
FEMGEN-227-01, HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01
Book
xxiv, 356 p., [12] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • "We Were Seized by Utter Despair" - from invasion to exile-- "The Element that was Dangerous for "Our Liberators"" - the Women of This Study-- "After All, I am a Polish Woman" - Self-Definition Through the Experience of Exile-- "Women were Treated the Same as Men" - labour in exile-- "As Long as There is Still a Polish Woman, There Will Also be a Polish Question" - Family and Nation-- "Homeless in Her Own Body" - The Body and Sexuality-- "We Polish Women Were a Model of Unity Before Their Citizens" - Self-Definition Through the Delineation of "Others"-- "They Abused Our Fatherland" - Coexisting With the National Minorities-- "Barely Distinguishable From Animals" : Encountering Asia-- "You Can't Even Call Them Women" - Condemning the Russians.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822941859 20160528
Using firsthand, personal accounts, and focusing on those written by women, Jolluck relates and examines the experiences of thousands of civilians deported to the USSR following the Soviet annexation of Eastern Poland in 1939. Upon arrival in remote areas of the Soviet Union, they were deposited in prisons, labour camps, special settlements and collective farms, and subjected to tremendous hardships and oppressive conditions. In 1942, some 115,000 Polish citizens - only a portion of those initially exiled from their homeland - were evacuated to Iran. There they were asked to complete extensive questionnaires about their experiences. Having read and reviewed hundreds of these documents, Jolluck reveals not only the harsh treatment these women recieved, but also how they maintained their identities as respectable women and patriotic Poles. She finds that for those exiled, the ways in which they strove to recreate home in a foreign and hostile environment became a key means of their survival.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822941859 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01
Book
xli, 242 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
From September 1941 until January 1944, the city of Leningrad suffered under one of the worst sieges in the history of warfare. At least one million civilians died, many during the first terribly cold winter. Bearing the brunt of this hardship - and keeping the city alive through their daily toil and sacrifice - were the women of Leningrad. Because the Stalinist purges in the late 1930s and the manpower needs of the Soviet army following the Nazi invasion, women easily constituted more than half of the city's population - and workforce - when the German and Finnish armies cut them off from the outside world. This volume uses recently opened archives of letters and diaries from the period of the siege and the immediate post-war years, conducted interviews with some of the remaining survivors and recovered poetry, fiction and retrospective memoirs written by "blokadnitsy" (women survivors) in order to present a truer picture of the city under siege.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822941835 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01
Video
1 videocassette (94 min.) sd. (stereo.), col. ; 1/2 in.
The story of childhood friends, one Croat, the other Serb, who marry only to be torn apart by war.
Media & Microtext Center
FEMGEN-227-01, HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01
Book
xxiii, 232 p. : 1 map ; 23 cm.
"How is one to explain the sudden reappearance of genocide on European soil less than a half century after the Nazi Holocaust and after three gen-erations of Europeans and Americans had come of age accepting the motto 'never again'?"-Roy Gutman, author of A Witness to Genocide. Alexandra Stiglmayer interviewed survivors of the continuing war in Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to reveal, to a seemingly deaf world, the horrors of the ongoing war in the former Yugoslavia. The women-primarily of Muslim but also of Croatian and Serbian origin-have endured the atrocities of rape and the loss of loved ones. Their testimony, published in the 1993 German edition, is bare, direct, and its cumulative effect overwhelming. The first English edition contains Stiglmayer's updates to her own two essays, one detailing the historical context of the current conflict and the other presenting the core of the book, interviews with some twenty victims of rape as well as interviews with three Serbian perpetrators. Essays investi-gating mass rape and war from ethnopsychological, sociological, cultural, and medical perspectives are included. New essays by Catharine A. MacKinnon, Rhonda Copelon, and Susan Brownmiller address the crucial issues of recognizing the human rights of women and children. A foreword by Roy Gutman describes war crimes within the context of the UN Tribunal, and an afterword by Cynthia Enloe relates the mass rapes of this war to developments and reactions in the international women's movement. Accounts of torture, murder, mutilation, abduction, sexual enslavement, and systematic attempts to impregnate-all in the name of "ethnic cleansing"-make for the grimmest of reading. However brutal and appalling the information conveyed here, this book cannot and should not be ignored. Alexandra Stiglmayer studied journalism at the University of Dortmund. Since 1992 she has been a freelance correspondent in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia for German and American radio and television. Marion Faber, the translator, is a professor of comparative literature at Swarthmore College and the translator of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human (Nebraska 1984) and Sarah Kirsch's The Panther Woman (Nebraska 1989).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803292291 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01
Green Library
HISTORY-227-01, HISTORY-327-01