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Book
xiii, 404 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • List of Plates viii Preface to the First Edition ix Preface to the Second Edition xi Preface to the Third Edition xii Introduction 1 Being Prejudiced in Favour of Literacy 7 Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Literacy 11 England's Place in Medieval Literacy 16 Part I TheMaking of Records 21 1 Memories and Myths of the Norman Conquest 23 The Formation of a Norman Official Memory 26 The Anglo-Saxon Heritage of Literacy 30 Latin and the Language of Domesday Book 35 William the Conqueror's Symbolic Knife 38 The EarlWarenne's Rusty Sword 41 2 The Proliferation of Documents 46 Documents at Village Level 48 The Chronology of Charter Making 54 The Output of Royal Documents 58 Documents and Bureaucracy 64 TheWork of HubertWalter 70 Royal Influence on Other Records 75 Appendix 80 3 Types of Record 83 The Variety ofWritings 83 Statements Issued by Individuals 87 Memoranda Kept by Institutions 94 Learned and LiteraryWorks 106 Liturgical Books 111 4 The Technology ofWriting 116 The Scribe and His Materials 117 Wax, Parchment, andWood 120 CommittingWords toWriting 127 Layout and Format 134 Rolls or Books? 137 5 The Preservation and Use of Documents 147 Monastic Documents for Posterity 148 Secular Documents for Daily Use 151 Archives and Libraries 156 The Royal Archives 164 Ways of Remembering 174 Ways of Indexing 179 Part II The LiterateMentality 187 What Reading Meant 192 6 Languages of Record 199 Walter of Bibbesworth's Treatise 199 The Variety of Languages 202 Spoken andWritten Language 208 Chronological Development 213 TheWriting Down of French 217 Royal Documents in Latin, French, and English 222 7 Literate and Illiterate 226 Meanings of 'Clericus' and 'Litteratus' 228 The Question of the Literacy of the Laity 233 Knowledge of Latin Among Non-Churchmen 236 The Acquisition of Clerical Education 242 Educated Knights 248 8 Hearing and Seeing 255 Symbolic Objects and Documents 256 The Spoken Versus theWrittenWord 262 Listening to theWord 268 The SpokenWord in Legal Procedure 274 Writings asWorks of Art 280 Word and Image 285 9 TrustingWriting 295 Memory andWriting 296 Dating Documents 300 Signing Documents 305 The Symbolism of Seals and Crosses 309 Forging Documents 318 10 Pragmatic Literacy 329 Postscript by the Author 336 List of Abbreviations 344 Select Further Reading 352 Plates 356 Index 396.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405157919 20160610
Updates this classic work for students and scholars of medieval history, tracing the development of literacy in England This book serves as an introduction to medieval books and documents for graduate students throughout the world Features a completely re-written first chapter, 'Memories and Myths of the Norman Conquest', and a new postscript by the author reflecting on the reception to the original publication and discussing recent scholarship on medieval literacy Includes a revised guide to further reading and a revision of the plates which illustrate medieval manuscripts in detail.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405157919 20160610
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
xii, 222 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface to the Second Edition.Preface to the First Edition.Introduction.1. Persecution.Heretics.Jews.Lepers.The Common Enemy.2. Classification.3. Purity and Danger.4. Power and Reason.5. A Persecuting Society.Bibliographical Excursus: Debating the Persecuting Society.Bibliography.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405129640 20160528
The tenth to the thirteenth centuries in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the Inquisition, the expropriation and mass murder of Jews, and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy and curtail their civil rights. These were traditionally seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book, first published in 1987 and now widely regarded as a classic in medieval history, R. I. Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society.In this new edition, R. I. Moore updates and extends his original argument with a new, final chapter, 'A Persecuting Society'. Here and in a new preface and critical bibliography, he considers the impact of a generation's research and refines his conception of the 'persecuting society' accordingly, addressing criticisms of the first edition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405129640 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
viii, 158 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-209S-01, HISTORY-313-01
Book
xiii, 266 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
A study of the creation and growth of one of the principal anti-Jewish stories of the Middle Ages and the violence it bred. Beginning in Paris in 1290, Jews were accused of abusing Christ by desecrating the Eucharist. Over the next two centuries this led to anti-semitic activity in Europe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300076127 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
xx, 411 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of illustrations-- Preface-- List of abbreviations-- 1. Introduction-- 2. The variety of reformers-- 3. The circumstances and types of reform-- 4. The rhetoric of reform-- 5. The realities of reform: (1) within the community-- 6. The realities of reform: (2) monastic activities and relations with secular society-- 7. The spirituality of reform-- 8. The broader setting-- Bibliography of secondary works-- Index of papal documents-- Biblication index-- General index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521305143 20160528
This book is concerned with the changes in religious thought and institutions from the late eleventh century to the third quarter of the twelfth. It concentrates on monks and nuns, but also takes into consideration hermits, recluses, wandering preachers, crusaders, penitents, and other less organised forms of religious life. In particular it studies the variety of reform movements, the relation of the reformers to each other and the outside world, and their spirituality and motivation as reflected in their writings and activities. The work stands in close relation to the author's Three Studies in Medieval Religious and Social Thought (1995), which took what may be called a horizontal approach, studying three topics over the entire Middle Ages. The present work takes a vertical approach, looking at many aspects of reform during a comparatively short period. Together the two works show the relatively rapid change in religious life and sentiments in the twelfth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521305143 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
xxxii, 443 p. ; 23 cm.
Medievalists, historians and women's studies specialists should welcome this translation of Herbert Grundmann's classic study of religious movements in the Middle Ages, which provides an historiography of medieval religious life - one that lies between the extremes of doctrinal classification and materialistic analysis - and because is represents a major effort to underline the importance of women in the development of the language and practice of religion in the Middle Ages. "Religious Movements in the Middle Ages" describes a lay religious movement of the 11th and 12th centuries that emphasised the centrality of lifestyle rather than doctrine. The religious groups that developed and solidified out of this movement were considered heterodox by some standards, orthodox by others. However, despite initial condemnation, these groups were eventually absorbed into the church and new groups, among them many women's groups, were given permissive rules to suit their peculiarities. Grundmann explicates the doctrines that lay behind these religious movements and captures the material contexts that fostered them. Most importantly he is able to recapture the dynamism of the groups themselves and to identify the historically contingent events that carried them along their various paths. Perhaps the greatest synthetic daring of Grundmann's study is his emphasis on the common point of departure shared by the religious groups that were ultimately to become located on either side of orthodoxy as defined by the Pope. Prior to Grundmann's study scholars had only discussed either high medieval heresy or new orders within the Church, but Grundmann discusses here the common inspiration that lay behind both.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780268016494 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
432 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
This provocative book shows that Europe in the Middle Ages was as much a product of a process of conquest and colonization as it was later a colonizer. "Will be of great interest to. . . . (those) interested in cultural transformation, colonialism, racism, the Crusades, or holy wars in general. . . ".--William C. Jordan, Princeton University. 12 halftones, 12 maps, 6 diagrams.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691032986 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
xiii, 191 p., [5] p. of plates : maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
x, 604 p. ; 25 cm.
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
xi, 267 p., [1] leaf of plates : facsim. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
x, 561 p. 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
280 p. illus., map. 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-313-01
Book
x p., 2 leaves, [3]-437 p. 22 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
HISTORY-313-01