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Book
xiv, 470 pages ; 25 cm
  • Chronology : Russia after Stalin
  • Remarks from an accomplice
  • The consolation of apocalypse : snatches of street noise and kitchen conversations (1991-2001)
  • Ten stories in a Red interior. On the beauty of dictatorship and the mystery of butterflies in cement ; On brothers and sisters, victims and executioners ... and the electorate ; On cries and whispers ... and exhilaration ; On the lonely Red marshal and three days of forgotten revolution ; On the mercy of memories and the lust for meaning ; On a different Bible and a different kind of believer ; On the cruelty of the flames and salvation from above ; On the sweetness of suffering and the trick of the Russian soul ; On a time when anyone who kills believes that they are serving God ; On the little Red flag and the smile of the axe
  • The charms of emptiness : snatches of street noise and kitchen conversations (2002-2012)
  • Ten stories in the absence of an interior. On Romeo and Juliet ... except their names were Margarita and Abulfaz ; On people who instantly transformed after the fall of Communism ; On a loneliness that resembles happiness ; On wanting to kill them all and the horror of realizing that you really wanted to do it ; On the old crone with a braid and the beautiful young woman ; On a stranger's grief that God has deposited on your doorstep ; On life the bitch and one hundred grams of fine powder in a little white vase ; On how nothing disgusts the dead and the silence of dust ; On the darkness of the evil one and "the other life we can build out of this one" ; On courage and what comes after
  • Notes from an everywoman.
"From the 2015 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, Svetlana Alexievich, comes the first English translation of her latest work, an oral history of the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the emergence of a new Russia. Bringing together dozens of voices in her distinctive documentary style, Secondhand Time is a monument to the collapse of the USSR, charting the decline of Soviet culture and speculating on what will rise from the ashes of communism. As in all her books, Alexievich gives voice to women and men whose stories are lost in the official narratives of nation-states, creating a powerful alternative history from the personal and private stories of individuals"-- Provided by publisher.
"Bringing together dozens of voices in her distinctive style of oral history, Secondhand Time is a monument to the collapse of the USSR, charting the decline of Soviet culture and speculating on what will rise from the ashes of Communism. As in all her books, Alexievich gives voice to women and men whose stories are lost in the official narratives of nation-states, creating a powerful alternative history from the personal and private stories of individuals. When the Swedish Academy awarded Svetlana Alexievich the Nobel Prize in Literature, they praised her 'polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time, ' and cited her for inventing 'a new kind of literary genre.' Sara Danius, the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy, added that her work comprises 'a history of emotions--a history of the soul'"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
HISTORY-204A-01, HISTORY-204A-01, HISTORY-304A-01, HISTORY-304A-01
Book
296 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Heorism (instead of an introduction)-- LTI-- prelude-- distinguishing feature - poverty-- Partenau-- from the diary of the first year-- the first three words of the Nazi language-- Aufzieben-- ten years of Fascism-- fanatical-- autocthonous writing-- blurring boundaries-- punctuation-- names-- Konlenklau-- Knif-- on a single working day-- system and organization-- I believe in him-- personal announcements as an LTI revision book-- what remains?-- German roost-- a sunny Weltanschuung (chance discoveries whilst reading)-- if two people do the same thing ...-- Cafe Europe-- the star-- the Jewish war-- the Jewish spectacles-- the language of the victor-- Zion-- the curse of the superlative-- from the great movement forward ... -- boxing-- Gefolgschaft-- the one syllable-- running hot and cold-- putting the theory to the test-- "cos of expressions" (an afterword).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780485115260 20160528
A Jewish professor of Roman studies, Victor Klemperer lived throughout the Nazi period in conditions of great deprivation and, intermittently, of deadly peril. This text is a linguistic diary kept secretly by Klemperer from 1933-45 in which he recorded the characteristic literary forms and usages of the Nazi regime and analysed the impact of Nazism of German language, life and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780485115260 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-204A-01, HISTORY-204A-01, HISTORY-304A-01, HISTORY-304A-01
Book
x, 291 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Scenes from a Survey The Presence of the Past: Patterns of Popular Historymaking Using the Past to Live in the Present: Relationships, Identity, Immorality Using the Past to Shape the Future: Building Narratives, Taking Responsibility "Experience is the Best Teacher": Participation, Mediation, Authority, Trust Beyond the Intimate Past: Americans and Their Collective Pasts History in Black and Red: African Americans and American Indians and Their Collective Pasts Afterthoughts: Everyone a Historian, by Roy Rosenzweig Afterthoughts: A Participatory Historical Culture, by David Thelen Appendix 1: How We Did the Survey Appendix 2: Tables Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231111492 20160528
Some people make photo albums, collect antiques, or visit historic battlefields. Others keep diaries, plan annual family gatherings, or stitch together patchwork quilts in a tradition learned from grandparents. Each of us has ways of communing with the past, and our reasons for doing so are as varied as our memories. In a sweeping survey, Roy Rosenzweig and David Thelen asked 1,500 Americans about their connection to the past and how it influences their daily lives and hopes for the future. The result is a surprisingly candid series of conversations and reflections on how the past infuses the present with meaning. Rosenzweig and Thelen found that people assemble their experiences into narratives that allow them to make sense of their personal histories, set priorities, project what might happen next, and try to shape the future. By using these narratives to mark change and create continuity, people chart the courses of their lives. A young woman from Ohio speaks of giving birth to her first child, which caused her to reflect upon her parents and the ways that their example would help her to become a good mother. An African American man from Georgia tells how he and his wife were drawn to each other by their shared experiences and lessons learned from growing up in the South in the 1950s. Others reveal how they personalize historical events, as in the case of a Massachusetts woman who traces much of her guarded attitude toward life to witnessing the assassination of John F. Kennedy on television when she was a child.While the past is omnipresent to Americans, "history" as it is usually defined in textbooks leaves many people cold. Rosenzweig and Thelen found that history as taught in school does not inspire a strong connection to the past. And they reveal how race and ethnicity affects how Americans perceive the past: while most white Americans tend to think of it as something personal, African Americans and American Indians are more likely to think in terms of broadly shared experiences--like slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, and the violation of Indian treaties." Rosenzweig and Thelen's conclusions about the ways people use their personal, family, and national stories have profound implications for anyone involved in researching or presenting history, as well as for all those who struggle to engage with the past in a meaningful way.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231111492 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-204A-01, HISTORY-204A-01, HISTORY-304A-01, HISTORY-304A-01