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Book
xxxix, 598 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 24 cm
From Neil MacGregor, the author of A History of the World in 100 Objects, this is a view of Germany like no other. For the past 140 years, Germany has been the central power in continental Europe. Twenty-five years ago a new German state came into being. How much do we really understand this new Germany, and how do its people now understand themselves? Neil MacGregor argues that uniquely for any European country, no coherent, over-arching narrative of Germany's history can be constructed, for in Germany both geography and history have always been unstable. Its frontiers have constantly floated. Konigsberg, home to the greatest German philosopher, Immanuel Kant, is now Kaliningrad, Russia; Strasbourg, in whose cathedral Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Germany's greatest writer, discovered the distinctiveness of his country's art and history, now lies within the borders of France. For most of the five hundred years covered by this book Germany has been composed of many separate political units, each with a distinct history. And any comfortable national story Germans might have told themselves before 1914 was destroyed by the events of the following thirty years. German history may be inherently fragmented, but it contains a large number of widely shared memories, awarenesses and experiences; examining some of these is the purpose of this book. Beginning with the fifteenth-century invention of modern printing by Gutenberg, MacGregor chooses objects and ideas, people and places which still resonate in the new Germany - porcelain from Dresden and rubble from its ruins, Bauhaus design and the German sausage, the crown of Charlemagne and the gates of Buchenwald - to show us something of its collective imagination. There has never been a book about Germany quite like it. Neil MacGregor has been Director of the British Museum since August 2002. He was Director of the National Gallery in London from 1987 to 2002. His previous books include A History of the World in 100 Objects and Shakespeare's Restless World, now between them translated into more than a dozen languages.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780241008331 20160617
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
xii, 455 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Maps Introduction 1. Frames 2. No One Is Home 3. Widow (or, the Virtue of Leadership) 4. Activist 5. Farmer 6. Midwife 7. Mother 8. Model 9. Laborer 10. Narrator Appendix: Interviews Notes Glossary References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520267701 20160605
What can we learn about the Chinese revolution by placing a doubly marginalized group - rural women - at the center of the inquiry? In this book, Gail Hershatter explores changes in the lives of seventy-two elderly women in rural Shaanxi province during the revolutionary decades of the 1950s and 1960s. Interweaving these women's life histories with insightful analysis, Hershatter shows how Party-state policy became local and personal, and how it affected women's agricultural work, domestic routines, activism, marriage, childbirth, and parenting - even their notions of virtue and respectability. The women narrate their pasts from the vantage point of the present and highlight their enduring virtues, important achievements, and most deeply harbored grievances. In showing what memories can tell us about gender as an axis of power, difference, and collectivity in 1950s rural China and the present, Hershatter powerfully examines the nature of socialism and how gender figured in its creation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520267701 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
xv, 240 pages ; 21 cm
  • Introduction
  • Cultural roots
  • The origins of national consciousness
  • Creole pioneers
  • Old languages, new models --- Official nationalism and imperialism
  • The last wave
  • Patriotism and racism
  • The angel of history
  • Census, map, museum
  • Memory and forgetting
  • Travel and traffic: on the geo-biography of Imagined communities.
What makes people love and die for nations, as well as hate and kill in their name? While many studies have been written on nationalist political movements, the sense of nationality - the personal and cultural feeling of belonging to the nation - has not received proportionate attention. In this widely acclaimed work, Benedict Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the 'imagined communities' of nationality. Anderson explores the processes that created these communities: the territorialisation of religious faiths, the decline of antique kingship, the interaction between capitalism and print, the development of vernacular languages-of-state, and changing conceptions of time. He shows how an originary nationalism born in the Americas was modularly adopted by popular movements in Europe, by the imperialist powers, and by the anti-imperialist resistances in Asia and Africa. This revised edition includes two new chapters, one of which discusses the complex role of the colonialist state's mindset in the development of Third World nationalism, while the other analyses the processes by which all over the world, nations came to imagine themselves as old.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780860915461 20160528
What makes people love and die for nations, as well as hate and kill in their name? While many studies have been written on nationalist political movements, the sense of nationality - the personal and cultural feeling of belonging to a nation - has not received proportionate attention. In this widely acclaimed work, Benedict Anderson examines the creation and function of the "imagined communities" of nationality and the way these communities were in part created by the growth of the nation-state, the interaction between capitalism and printing and the birth of vernacular languages in early modern Europe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781844670864 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
xii, 301 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowlegments ix Introduction: The Idea of Provincializing Europe 3 Part One: Historicism and the Narration of Modernity Chapter 1. Postcoloniality and the Artifice of History 27 Chapter 2. The Two Histories of Capital 47 Chapter 3. Translating Life-Worlds into Labor and History 72 Chapter 4. Minority Histories, Subaltern Pasts 97 Part Two: Histories of Belonging Chapter 5. Domestic Cruelty and the Birth of the Subject 117 Chapter 6. Nation and Imagination 149 Chapter 7. Adda: A History of Sociality 180 Chapter 8. Family, Fraternity, and Salaried labor 214 Epilogue. Reason and the Critique of Historicism 237 Notes 257 Index 299.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691049090 20160528
Exploring how post-colonial thinking impacts on the social sciences, this text examines the problems of thought that present themselves when we think of a place such as India through the categories of modern, European social science and, in particular, history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691049083 20160528
Can European thought be dislodged from the center of the practice of history in a non-European place? What problems arise when we translate cultural practices into the categories of social science? "Provincializing Europe" is one of the first book-length treatments on how postcolonial thinking impacts on the social sciences. This book explores, through a series of linked essays, the problems of thought that present themselves when we think of a place such as India through the categories of modern, European social science and, in particular, history. "Provincializing Europe" is a sustained conversation between historical thinking and postcolonial perspectives. It addresses the mythical figure of Europe that is often taken to be the original site of the modern in many histories of capitalist transition in non-Western countries. This imaginary Europe, Chakrabarty argues, is built right into the social sciences. The very idea of historicizing carries with it some peculiarly European assumptions about disenchanted space, secular time, and human sovereignty. Measured against such mythical standards, capitalist transition in the third world has often seemed either incomplete or lacking. Chakrabarty finds that "Nativism, " however, is no answer to Eurocentrism, because the universals propounded by European Enlightenment remain indispensable to any social critique that seeks to address issues of social justice and equity. "Provincializing Europe" proposes that every case of transition to capitalism is a case of translation as well - a translation of existing worlds and their thought-categories into the categories and self-understandings of capitalist modernity. Chakrabarty demonstrates, both theoretically and with examples from colonial and contemporary India, how such translational histories may be thought and written. "Provincializing Europe" is not a project of shunning European thought. It is a project of globalizing such thought by exploring how it may be renewed both for and from the margins.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691049090 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
xxiii, 530 p., [16] leaves of plates: ill. ; 25 cm.
An American frontier study, focusing on the fastest growing city of 19th-century America - Chicago. It shows the land as it was when inhabited by Indians and a few white settlers, and the frenzy of development of the meat-packing industry, the grain emporiums and the lumber markets which followed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393029215 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
xvi, 444 p., [30] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword Note on the Text Author's Note The Boston Poems Cups 1-12 The Park The Faerie Queene The Moth Poem Image-Nations -4 Les Chimeres Charms Great Companion: Pindar Image-Nations 5-14 and Uncollected Poems Streams I Syntax Pell Mell Great Companion: Robert Duncan Streams II Exody Notes Great Companion: Dante Alighiere Wanders So Oh! Afterword Index of Titles and First Lines.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520063297 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
168 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01

8. War without mercy [1986]

Book
xii, 398 p.
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01

9. Orientalism [1978]

Book
xi, 368 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
333 p., [3] leaves of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
958 p. ; 19 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01
Book
848 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-304-01