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Book
xv, 277 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Indictment
  • Monsters
  • Testimony
  • Emotions
  • Verdict
  • Vanity.
The trial of Cultural Revolution leaders, including Mao's widow and her Gang of Four, was the signal event in China's post-Mao transition. In its wake, Chinese socialism emerged from the rubble of the Cultural Revolution to create the China that we know today. This spectacular show trial was a curious example of transitional justice, marking a break from the trauma of the past, a shift to the present era of reform, and a blueprint for building a better future. In this groundbreaking reconstruction of the most famous trial in Chinese history, Alex Cook shows how the event laid the cornerstone for a new model of socialist justice; at the same time, a comparison of official political and legal sources with works of popular literature reveals the conflicted cultural dimensions of this justice. The result, Cook argues, saved Chinese socialism as ruling ideology, but at the cost of its revolutionary soul.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521761116 20170220
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
ix, 258 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Suspicious deaths and city life in Republican Beijing-- 2. On the case with the Beijing procuracy-- 3. Disputed forensics and skeletal remains-- 4. Publicity, professionals, and the cause of forensic reform-- 5. Professional politics of a crime scene-- 6. Dissection and its discontents-- 7. Legal medicine during the Nanjing decade-- Conclusion: a history of forensic modernity-- Glossary-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107126060 20160928
In this innovative and engaging history of homicide investigation in Republican Beijing, Daniel Asen explores the transformation of ideas about death in China in the first half of the twentieth century. In this period, those who died violently or under suspicious circumstances constituted a particularly important population of the dead, subject to new claims by police, legal and medical professionals, and a newspaper industry intent on covering urban fatality in sensational detail. Asen examines the process through which imperial China's old tradition of forensic science came to serve the needs of a changing state and society under these dramatically new circumstances. This is a story of the unexpected outcomes and contingencies of modernity, presenting new perspectives on China's transition from empire to modern nation state, competing visions of science and expertise, and the ways in which the meanings of death and dead bodies changed amid China's modern transformation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107126060 20160928
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xiii, 241 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Writing for new literates in the Chinese countryside
  • To the countryside
  • Organizing the village
  • Village contestations
  • A movement made and lost.
Discussions of China's early twentieth-century modernization efforts tend to focus almost exclusively on cities, and the changes, both cultural and industrial, seen there. As a result, the communist peasant revolution appears as a decisive historical break. Kate Merkel-Hess corrects that misconception by demonstrating how crucial the countryside was for reformers in rural China long before the success of the communist revolution. In The Rural Modern, Merkel-Hess shows that Chinese reformers and intellectuals created a modernity that was not the foreign and new modernity of Shanghai and other cities, but instead one that captured the Chinese people's desire for an agenda for social and political change rooted in rural Chinese traditions and institutions. She traces efforts to remake village education, social and cultural life, economics, and politics, analyzing how these efforts contributed to a new, inclusive vision of rural Chinese political life. Merkel-Hess argues that as China sought to redefine itself politically and culturally, such rural reform efforts played a major role, and tensions that thus emerged between rural and urban ways deeply informed social relations, government policies, and subsequent efforts to create a modern nation during the communist period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226383279 20161024
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xvi, 335 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Executive Preface Acknowledgments 1. Breaking into Laughter 2. Jokes 3. Play 4. Mockery 5. Farce 6. The Invention of Humor Epilogue Appendix 1: Selected Chinese Humor Collections, 1900--1937 Appendix 2: Which Classic? Editions and Paratexts Abbreviations Notes Glossary Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520283848 20160618
The Age of Irreverence tells the story of why China's entry into the modern age was not just traumatic, but uproarious. As the Qing dynasty slumped toward extinction, prominent writers compiled jokes into collections they called histories of laughter." In the first years of the Republic, novelists, essayists and illustrators alike used humorous allegories to make veiled critiques of the new government. But, again and again, political and cultural discussion erupted into invective, as critics gleefully jeered and derided rivals in public. Farceurs drew followings in the popular press, promoting a culture of practical joking and buffoonery. Eventually, these various expressions of hilarity proved so offensive to high-brow writers that they launched a concerted campaign to transform the tone of public discourse, hoping to displace the old forms of mirth with a new one they called youmo (humor). Christopher Rea argues that this period from the 1890s to the 1930s transformed how Chinese people thought and talked about what is funny. Focusing on five cultural expressions of laughter jokes, play, mockery, farce, and humor he reveals the textures of comedy that were a part of everyday life during modern China's first age of irreverence." This new history of laughter not only offers an unprecedented and up-close look at a neglected facet of Chinese cultural modernity, but also reveals its lasting legacy in the Chinese language of the comic today and its implications for our understanding of humor as a part of human culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520283848 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xiv, 329 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
This volume explores how the rise of entrepreneurship impacted the business of culture in China and Southeast Asia between the late nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries. It argues that paradigms of cultural agency based on singular categories such as "author" or "filmmaker" overlook one of the most dramatic modern transformations in the cultural sphere: the increased tendency of individuals and organizations to engage in multiple modes of cultural production across social, occupational, and geographic borders. A Suzhou migrant, for instance, might cobble together a career as a principal, translator, and health food manufacturer. How do we account for these plural orientations? In answering this question, contributors draw on a new analytical rubric: cultural entrepreneurship. Contributors: Robert Culp, Grace Fong, Wang Gungwu, Michael Gibbs Hill, Eugenia Lean, Chua Ai Lin, Christopher G. Rea, Sin Yee Theng, Nicolai Volland, Sai-Shing Yung.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774827805 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xxiii, 370 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: for the public good-- 1. Reform: making China fit the world (1895-1915)-- 2. Revolution: awakening new China (1915-35)-- 3. Rejuvenation: organizing China (1936-56)-- 4. Revolutionary revival: overthrowing the lords of nation-building (1957-76)-- 5. Reviving reform: correcting revolutionary errors (1976-95)-- 6. Rejuvenation: securing the Chinese dream (1996-2015)-- Conclusion: intellectuals, China and the world-- Who's who: intellectuals featured in the main text-- Further reading-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107021419 20160619
This vivid narrative history of Chinese intellectuals and public life provides a guide to making sense of China today. Timothy Cheek presents a map and a method for understanding the intellectual in the long twentieth century, from China's defeat in the Sino-Japanese war in 1895 to the 'Prosperous China' since the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek surveys the changing terrain of intellectual life over this transformative century in Chinese history to enable readers to understand a particular figure, idea or debate. The map provides coordinates to track different times, different social worlds and key concepts. The historical method focuses on context and communities during six periods to make sense of ideas, institutions and individual thinkers across the century. Together they provide a memorable account of the scenes and protagonists, and arguments and ideas, of intellectuals and public life in modern China.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107021419 20160619
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xvi, 486 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
"Cultural Revolution Culture", often denigrated as nothing but propaganda, not only was liked in its heyday but continues to be enjoyed today. A Continuous Revolution sets out to explain its legacy. By considering Cultural Revolution propaganda art-music, stage works, prints and posters, comics, and literature - from the point of view of its longue duree, Barbara Mittler suggests that Cultural Revolution propaganda art was able to build on a tradition of earlier art works, and this allowed for its sedimentation in cultural memory and its proliferation in contemporary China. Taking the aesthetic experience of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) as her base, Mittler juxtaposes close readings and analyses of cultural products from the period with impressions given in a series of personal interviews conducted in the early 2000s with Chinese from diverse class and generational backgrounds. By including much testimony from these original voices, Mittler illustrates the extremely multifaceted and contradictory nature of the Cultural Revolution, both in terms of artistic production and of its cultural experience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674065819 20160615
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xii, 455 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Maps Introduction 1. Frames 2. No One Is Home 3. Widow (or, the Virtue of Leadership) 4. Activist 5. Farmer 6. Midwife 7. Mother 8. Model 9. Laborer 10. Narrator Appendix: Interviews Notes Glossary References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520267701 20160605
What can we learn about the Chinese revolution by placing a doubly marginalized group - rural women - at the center of the inquiry? In this book, Gail Hershatter explores changes in the lives of seventy-two elderly women in rural Shaanxi province during the revolutionary decades of the 1950s and 1960s. Interweaving these women's life histories with insightful analysis, Hershatter shows how Party-state policy became local and personal, and how it affected women's agricultural work, domestic routines, activism, marriage, childbirth, and parenting - even their notions of virtue and respectability. The women narrate their pasts from the vantage point of the present and highlight their enduring virtues, important achievements, and most deeply harbored grievances. In showing what memories can tell us about gender as an axis of power, difference, and collectivity in 1950s rural China and the present, Hershatter powerfully examines the nature of socialism and how gender figured in its creation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520267701 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xv, 319 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The push of Westernized radicalism-- 2. The pull of cultural conservatism-- 3. The politics of modern Chinese conservatism-- 4. Liberalism in China and Chinese liberal thought-- 5. The state, government and rule of law-- 6. The rise of reformist socialist thought-- 7. From state socialism to social democracy-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521195119 20160604
In the early twentieth century, China was on the brink of change. Different ideologies - those of radicalism, conservatism, liberalism, and social democracy - were much debated in political and intellectual circles. Whereas previous works have analyzed these trends in isolation, Edmund S. K. Fung shows how they related to one another and how intellectuals in China engaged according to their cultural and political persuasions. The author argues that it is this interrelatedness and interplay between different schools of thought that are central to the understanding of Chinese modernity, for many of the debates that began in the Republican era still resonate in China today. The book charts the development of these ideologies and explores the work and influence of the intellectuals who were associated with them. In its challenge to previous scholarship and the breadth of its approach, the book makes a major contribution to the study of Chinese political philosophy and intellectual history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521195119 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01
Book
xiv, 315 p. ; 25 cm.
The May Fourth Movement, which began in 1919, was a time of nationalist and revolutionary activism and intellectual ferment in China which can be likened to the 1960s in the United States. Anarchism was the predominant revolutionary ideology; Marxism was virtually unknown. Yet by 1921 the Communist Party of China had emerged as the unchallenged leader of the Left. This book offers a new explanation of this development using documents previously unavailable in China but released since the death of Mao. It argues that left to their own devices Chinese revolutionaries would have naturally gravitated towards non-Marxist ideologies, but that when Communist thought and organization was introduced to radical circles by the Comintern it found extraordinarily fertile ground.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195054538 20160527
In this study of the origins of Chinese communism, Arif Dirlik offers a revisionist account of the introduction and triumph of Marxism in China. Using a wealth of fresh material, much of it released only after Mao's death, this book is aimed at scholars of Chinese history and politics, Marxism and comparative communism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195054545 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-298-01, HISTORY-398-01