%{search_type} search results

4 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
323 p. : map ; 24 cm
Hazem Kandil presents the Egyptian revolution and its aftermath as the latest episodes in the ongoing power struggle between the three components of Egypt's authoritarian regime: the military, the security services and the political apparatus. A detailed study of the interactions within this invidious triangle over six decades of war, conspiracy and sociopolitical transformation, Soldiers, Spies, and Statesmen is the first systematic analysis of how Egypt metamorphosed from a military into a police state - and what that means for the future of its revolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781781681428 20160613
Green Library
HISTORY-281B-01, HISTORY-381B-01
Book
xviii, 360 pages ; 25 cm
  • Preface ix Acknowledgments xiii Note on Transliteration xvii Chapter One Conceptualizing Islamist Movement Change 1 Chapter Two The Brotherhood's Early Years 20 Chapter Three The Brotherhood's Foray into Electoral Politics 46 Chapter Four The Wasat Party Initiative and the Brotherhood's Response 76 Chapter Five The Brotherhood's Seesaw between Self-Assertion and Self-Restraint 96 Chapter Six Repression and Retrenchment 120 Chapter Seven The Brotherhood and the Egyptian Uprising 154 Chapter Eight Egypt's Islamist Movement in Comparative Perspective 196 Chapter Nine The Muslim Brotherhood in (Egypt's) Transition 247 Notes 289 List of Interviews 327 Selected Bibliography 331 Index 347.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691149400 20160612
The Muslim Brotherhood has achieved a level of influence nearly unimaginable before the Arab Spring. The Brotherhood was the resounding victor in Egypt's 2011-2012 parliamentary elections, and six months later, a leader of the group was elected president. Yet the implications of the Brotherhood's rising power for the future of democratic governance, peace, and stability in the region is open to dispute. Drawing on more than one hundred in-depth interviews as well as Arabic language sources not previously accessed by Western researchers, Carrie Rosefsky Wickham traces the evolution of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt from its founding in 1928 to the fall of Mubarak and the watershed elections of 2011-2012. Further, she compares the Brotherhood's trajectory with those of mainstream Islamist groups in Jordan, Kuwait, and Morocco, revealing a wider pattern of change. Wickham highlights the internal divisions of such groups and explores the shifting balance of power among them. She shows that they are not proceeding along a linear path toward greater moderation. Rather, their course has been marked by profound tensions and contradictions, yielding hybrid agendas in which newly embraced themes of freedom and democracy coexist uneasily with illiberal concepts of Shari'a carried over from the past. Highlighting elements of movement continuity and change, and demonstrating that shifts in Islamist worldviews, goals, and strategies are not the result of a single strand of cause and effect, Wickham provides a systematic, fine-grained account of Islamist group evolution in Egypt and the wider Arab world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691149400 20160612
Green Library
HISTORY-281B-01, HISTORY-381B-01

3. Taxi [2008]

Book
218 p. ; 22 cm.
It is the most diverse species on the planet and it inhabits the polluted, unforgiving streets of Cairo, a city that simply refuses to stand still. The taxi driver is an urban omnivore whose high-speed colours, habits and moods reflect all surrounding life, and yet pass it by, in the bustling flora and fauna of the Egyptian capital. Khaled Al Khamissi's "Taxi" is a remarkable journey into the lives and labyrinths of this beast of burden that has become a best-selling modern masterpiece in the author's home country. "Taxi" brings together 58 fictional monologues with Cairo cabbies recreated from the author's own experience of traversing the city. The experience takes the reader on a roller-coaster of emotions as bumpy and noisy as the city's potholed and chaotic streets.Described as an urban sociology, an ethnography, a classic of oral history - and a work of poetry in motion - "Taxi" tells Herculean tales of the struggle for survival and dignity among Greater Cairo's 80,000 cab drivers. A wing-mirror that reflects both on modern Egypt and on the human condition, it plucks from the rush-hour sandstorm a feast of drivers' recollections, memories, personal stories, lies, loves, hates, dreams and philosophical adventures.Translated by Jonathan Wright, "Taxi" is a unique work combining the authentic insights of the man on the street with the poignant self-reflections of members of a caste who have little or nothing in common. Written in a rich colloquial that departs with a slam of a dented door from the literary language Egyptian writers commonly employ, it has been credited with reviving an interest in reading as it has become an instant best-seller, topping the sales charts in Arabic-speaking markets. "Taxi" will be released to the English market to co-incide with Arab countries being the market focus of the 2008 London Book Fair.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781906300029 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-281B-01, HISTORY-381B-01
Video
1 videodisc (ca. 143 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
A classic Egyptian film about two idealistic young people during the unstable social and political life in Egypt during the late 60s and early 70s of the last century. The film takes its name from the cafe where many intellectuals and college students, whose loyalties to the regime were in question, gathered.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-281B-01, HISTORY-381B-01