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Book
439 p. ; 22 cm.
  • The demise of free security
  • Confrontation
  • To the ends of the earth
  • Leaner and meaner
  • The nuclear Rubicon
  • Gulliver's travails
  • Nixon's world
  • A new Cold War
  • Endgame.
The Cold War dominated world affairs during the half century following World War II. It ended in victory for the United States, yet it was a costly triumph, claiming trillions of dollars in defense spending and the lives of nearly 100,000 U.S. soldiers. Apocalyptic anti-communism sharply limited the range of acceptable political debate, while American actions overseas led to the death of millions of innocent civilians and destabilized dozens of nations that posed no threat to the United States. In a brilliant new interpretation, Campbell Craig and Fredrik Logevall reexamine the successes and failures of America's Cold War. The United States dealt effectively with the threats of Soviet predominance in Europe and of nuclear war in the early years of the conflict. But in engineering this policy, American leaders successfully paved the way for domestic actors and institutions with a vested interest in the struggle's continuation. Long after the USSR had been effectively contained, Washington continued to wage a virulent Cold War that entailed a massive arms buildup, wars in Korea and Vietnam, the support of repressive regimes and counterinsurgencies, and a pronounced militarization of American political culture. American foreign policy after 1945 was never simply a response to communist power or a crusade contrived solely by domestic interests. It was always an amalgamation of both. This provocative book lays bare the emergence of a political tradition in Washington that feeds on external dangers, real or imagined, a mindset that inflames U.S. foreign policy to this day.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674035539 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-266C-01, INTNLREL-154-01
Book
xvi, 467 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-266C-01, INTNLREL-154-01
Book
xiv, 484 p. : ill., maps. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The empire of liberty: American ideology and foreign interventions-- 2. The empire of justice: Soviet ideology and foreign interventions-- 3. The revolutionaries: anti-colonial politics and transformations-- 4. Creating the Third World: the United States confronts revolution-- 5. The Cuban and Vietnamese challenges-- 6. The crisis of decolonization: Southern Africa-- 7. The prospects of socialism: Ethiopia and the Horn-- 8. The Islamist defiance-- 9. The 1980s: the Reagan offensive-- 10. The Gorbachev withdrawal and the end of the Cold War-- Conclusion: Revolutions, interventions and Great Power collapse.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521853644 20180530
The Cold War shaped the world we live in today - its politics, economics, and military affairs. This book shows how the globalization of the Cold War during the last century created the foundations for most of the key conflicts we see today, including the War on Terror. It focuses on how the Third World policies of the two twentieth-century superpowers - the United States and the Soviet Union - gave rise to resentments and resistance that in the end helped topple one superpower and still seriously challenge the other. Ranging from China to Indonesia, Iran, Ethiopia, Angola, Cuba, and Nicaragua, it provides a truly global perspective on the Cold War. And by exploring both the development of interventionist ideologies and the revolutionary movements that confronted interventions, the book links the past with the present in ways that no other major work on the Cold War era has succeeded in doing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521853644 20180530
Green Library
HISTORY-266C-01, INTNLREL-154-01
Book
xvii, 694 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Studying the Cold War-- 1. Origins 1917-1945-- 2. The Iron Curtain-- 3. The Division of Germany-- 4. The Marshall Plan and NATO-- 5. The United States and Japan 1945-1965-- 6. The Korean War and the Sino-Soviet Alliance-- 7. The Vietnam Wars 1945-1975-- 8. Communism in Eastern Europe and China-- 9. Technologies, Weapons, and the Arms Race-- 10. The Integration of Western Europe-- 11. Decolonization and the Cold War-- 12. Latin America and the Cold War-- 13. Cultures and Mindsets-- 14. Spies and Covert Operations-- 15. The Rise of Detente-- 16. The Fall of Detente-- 17. Challenges to the Cold War-- 18. The End of the Cold War-- 19. Cold War Legacies-- Sources-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Cold War contains a selection of official and unofficial documents which provide a truly multi-faceted account of the entire Cold War era. This volume presents the different kinds of materials necessary to understand what the Cold War was about, how it was fought, and the ways in which it affected the lives of people around the globe. By depicting the experiences of East Berlin housewives and South African students, as well as those of political leaders from Europe and the Third World, The Cold War emphasizes the variety of ways in which the Cold War conflict was experienced. The significance of these differences is essential to understanding the Cold War: it demonstrates how the causes of the clash may have looked very different in Santiago from the way they looked in Seoul, New York, Moscow, or Beijing. The book examines the entirety of the Cold War era, presenting documents from the end of World War II right up to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. A final selection of source material goes on to illustrate the impact of the Cold War to the present day. Again, the emphasis is global: there are documents on the aftermath of the Cold War in Africa and Europe, as well as on the links between the Cold War and the dramatic events of 11 September 2001. By providing a truly international glimpse of the Cold War and its various actors and subjects, The Cold War helps cut through the often simplistic notions of the recent past and allows the reader to explore the truly global impact of the East-West confrontation that dominated international relations in the second half of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
HISTORY-266C-01, INTNLREL-154-01
Book
x, 400 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
This comprehensive study of China's Cold War experience reveals the crucial role Beijing played in shaping the orientation of the global Cold War and the confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union. The success of China's Communist revolution in 1949 set the stage, Chen says. The Korean War, the Taiwan Strait crisis and the Vietnam War - all of which involved China as a central actor -represented the only major "hot" conflicts during the Cold War period, making East Asia the main battlefield of the Cold War, while creating conditions to prevent the two superpowers from engaging in a direct military showdown. Beijing's split with Moscow and a rapprochement with Washington fundamentally transformed the international balance of power, argues Chen, eventually leading to the end of the Cold War with the collapse of the Soviet Empire and the decline of international communism. It is based on sources that include recently declassified Chinese documents, the book offers pathbreaking insights into the course and outcome of the Cold War.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807826171 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-266C-01, INTNLREL-154-01