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Book
609 pages ; 24 cm
  • 1. The Philosopher of Sea Power : Alfred Thayer Mahan
  • 2. Kant's Best Hope : Woodrow Wilson
  • 3. Americans First : Charles Beard
  • 4. The Syndicated Oracle : Walter Lippmann
  • The Artist : George Kennan
  • 6. The Scientist : Paul Nitze
  • 7. Metternich Redux : Henry Kissinger
  • 8. The Worldmaker : Paul Wolfowitz
  • 9. Barack Obama and the Pragmatic Renewal.
"A new intellectual history of U.S. foreign policy from the late nineteenth century to the present. Worldmaking is a fresh and compelling new take on the history of American diplomacy. Rather than retracing a familiar story of realism versus idealism, David Milne suggests that U.S. foreign policy has also been crucially divided between those who view statecraft as an art and those who believe it can aspire toward the certainties of science. Worldmaking follows a colorful cast of characters who built on each other's ideas to create the policies we have today. Woodrow Wilson's Universalism and moralism led Sigmund Freud to diagnose a messiah complex. Walter Lippmann was an internationally syndicated columnist who commanded the attention of leaders as diverse as Theodore Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, and Charles de Gaulle. Paul Wolfowitz was the intellectual architect of the 2003 invasion of Iraq--an ardent admirer of Wilson's attempt to 'make the world safe for democracy.' Each was engaged in a process of worldmaking, formulating strategies that sought to deploy the nation's vast military and economic power--or indeed its retraction through a domestic reorientation--to 'make' a world in which America is best positioned to thrive. From the age of steam engines to the age of drones, Milne reveals patterns of aspirant worldmaking that have remained impervious to the passage of time. The result is a panoramic history of U.S. foreign policy driven by ideas and the lives and times of their creators"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
HISTORY-252K-01, INTNLREL-168-01
Book
viii, 407 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments vii Introduction: The Long American Century 1 1 Motives of Expansion 7 2 Imperial America: War with Spain and the Philippines 32 3 Varieties of Empire 56 4 The Rise and Fall of Wilsonianism 79 5 Isolation and Intervention 107 6 World War II 131 7 The Beginning of the Cold War 157 8 The Korean War and the Cold War of the 1950s 182 9 The Nationalist Challenge 206 10 Years of Crisis 231 11 The Vietnam War 255 12 The Era of Detente 281 13 Escalating and Ending the Cold War 305 14 Globalization after the Cold War 331 15 The Age of Terror 354 Sources 379 Index 395.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691161754 20160613
How should America wield its enormous power beyond its borders? Should it adhere to grand principles or act on narrow self-interest? Should it partner with other nations or avoid entangling alliances? Americans have been grappling with questions like these throughout the nation's history, and especially since the emergence of the United States as a major world power in the late nineteenth century. America in the World illuminates this history by capturing the diverse voices and viewpoints of some of the most colorful and eloquent people who participated in these momentous debates. Spanning the era from the Gilded Age to the Obama years, this unique reader collects more than two hundred documents--everything from presidential addresses and diplomatic cables to political cartoons and song lyrics. It encompasses various phases of American diplomatic history that are typically treated separately, such as the First World War, the Cold War, and 9/11. The book presents the perspectives of elite policymakers--presidents, secretaries of state, generals, and diplomats--alongside those of other kinds of Americans, such as newspaper columnists, clergymen, songwriters, poets, and novelists. It also features numerous documents from other countries, illustrating how foreigners viewed America's role in the world. Ideal for classroom use, America in the World sheds light on the complex interplay of political, economic, ideological, and cultural factors underlying the exercise of American power on the global stage. Includes more than two hundred documents from the late nineteenth century to today Looks at everything from presidential addresses to political cartoons and song lyrics Presents diverse perspectives, from elite policymakers to clergymen and novelists Features documents from outside the United States, illustrating how people in other countries viewed America's role in the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691161754 20160613
Green Library
HISTORY-252K-01, INTNLREL-168-01
Book
viii, 214 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
  • The road to revolution
  • Colonialism and Cold War
  • An anguished peace
  • Escalation
  • War on many fronts
  • The Tet Offensive
  • The end of the American War
  • Wars unending.
The Vietnam War remains a topic of extraordinary interest, especially in light of the invasion of Iraq. In The Vietnam War, Mark Lawrence offers readers a superb short account of this key moment in U.S. as well as world history, based on the latest European and American research and on newly opened archives in China, Russia, and Vietnam. While focusing on the American involvement from 1965 to 1975, Lawrence offers an unprecedentedly complete picture of all sides of the war, drawing on now available communist records to capture the complicated brew of motivations that drove the other side. Moreover, the book reaches back well before American forces set foot in Vietnam, describing for instance how French colonialism sparked the 1945 Vietnamese revolution, and revealing how the Cold War concerns of the 1950s warped Washington's perception of Vietnam, leading the United States to back the French and eventually become involved on the ground itself. Of course, the heart of the book is the "American war, " ranging from the overthrow of Ngo Dinh Diem to the impact of the Tet Offensive on the political situation in the US, Johnson's withdrawal from the 1968 presidential race, Nixon's expansion of the war into Cambodia and Laos, and the final peace agreement of 1973, which ended American military involvement. Finally, the book examines the aftermath of the war, from the momentous liberalization--"Doi Moi"--in Vietnam that began in 1986, to the enduring legacy of the war in American books, films, and political debate. A quick and reliable primer on an intensely relevant topic, this well researched and engaging volume offers an invaluable overview of the Vietnam War.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195314656 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-252K-01, INTNLREL-168-01
Book
xx, 586 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • The origins of the Cold War, 1945-48 : Stalin and Truman
  • The chance for peace, 1953-54 : Malenkov and Eisenhower
  • Retreat from armageddon, 1962-65 : Khrushchev, Kennedy, and Johnson
  • The erosion of détente, 1975-80 : Brezhnev and Carter
  • The end of the Cold War, 1985-90 : Reagan and Gorbachev.
Green Library
HISTORY-252K-01, INTNLREL-168-01
Book
x, 209 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-252K-01, INTNLREL-168-01
Book
xi, 258 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-252K-01, INTNLREL-168-01