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Book
x, 151 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Slavery, states' rights, and secession commissioners
  • The first wave
  • The South Carolinians
  • The Alabamiams
  • The mission to Virginia
  • Conclusion: apostles of disunion, apostles of racism
  • Afterword: apostles of disunion fifteen years later.
Charles Dew's Apostles of Disunion has established itself as a modern classic and an indispensable account of the Southern states' secession from the Union. Addressing topics still hotly debated among historians and the public at large more than a century and a half after the Civil War, the book offers a compelling and clearly substantiated argument that slavery and race were at the heart of our great national crisis. The fifteen years since the original publication of Apostles of Disunion have seen an intensification of debates surrounding the Confederate flag and Civil War monuments. In a powerful new afterword to this anniversary edition, Dew situates the book in relation to these recent controversies and factors in the role of vast financial interests tied to the internal slave trade in pushing Virginia and other upper South states toward secession and war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813939445 20170206
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
306 pages ; 25 cm
A magnificent tour de force chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01

3. 12 years a slave [2013]

Video
1 videodisc (approximately 134 minutes) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; surround; stereo; Dolby. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; Region 1.
Based on the true story of Solomon Northup. It is 1841, and Northup, an accomplished, free citizen of New York, is kidnapped and sold into slavery. Stripped of his identity and deprived of all dignity, Northup is ultimately purchased by ruthless plantation owner Edwin Epps and must find the strength within to survive. Filled with powerful performances by an astonishing cast including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch, Brad Pitt, and newcomer Lupita Nyong'o, 12 Years a Slave is both an unflinching account of slavery in American history and a celebration of the indomitable power of hope.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-252C-01, FILMPROD-105-01, FILMPROD-305-01, HISTORY-252C-01, THINK-31-01, THINK-31-01
Video
1 videodisc (134 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Digital: video file; Blu-Ray.
The harrowing account of a black man, born free in New York State, who was drugged, kidnapped, and sold into slavery in 1841. Having no way to contact his family, and fearing for his life if he told the truth, Solomon Northup was sold from plantation to plantation in Louisiana, toiling under cruel masters for twelve years before meeting Samuel Bass, a Canadian who finally put him in touch with his family, and helped start the process to regain his freedom.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-252C-01, FILMPROD-105-01, FILMPROD-305-01, HISTORY-252C-01, THINK-31-01, THINK-31-01
Book
279 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Exotic, seductive, and doomed: the antebellum mixed-race free woman of color has long operated as a metaphor for New Orleans. Commonly known as a "quadroon, " she and the city she represents rest irretrievably condemned in the popular historical imagination by the linked sins of slavery and interracial sex. However, as Emily Clark shows, the rich archives of New Orleans tell a different story. Free women of color with ancestral roots in New Orleans were as likely to marry in the 1820s as white women. And marriage, not concubinage, was the basis of their family structure. In "The Strange History of the American Quadroon, " Clark investigates how the narrative of the erotic colored mistress became an elaborate literary and commercial trope, persisting as a symbol that long outlived the political and cultural purposes for which it had been created. Untangling myth and memory, she presents a dramatically new and nuanced understanding of the myths and realities of New Orleans's free women of color.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469607528 20160612
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
374 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
Ira Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the 17th century to its fiery demise nearly 300 years later. Most Americans, black and white, have a singular vision of slavery, one fixed in the mid-19th century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South and subscribed to Christianity. Here, however, Berlin offers a dynamic vision, a major reinterpretation in which slaves and their owners continually renegotiated the terms of captivity. Slavery was thus made and remade by successive generations of Africans and Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately emancipation. Berlin's understanding of the processes that continually transformed the lives of slaves makes "Generations of Captivity" useful reading for anyone interested in the evolution of antebellum America. Connecting the "charter generation" to the development of Atlantic society in the 17th century, the "plantation generation" to the reconstruction of colonial society in the 18th century, the "revolutionary generation" to the age of revolutions, and the "migration generation" to American expansionism in the 19th century, Berlin integrates the history of slavery into the larger story of American life. He demonstrates how enslaved black people, by adapting to changing circumstances, prepared for the moment when they could seize liberty and declare themselves the "freedom generation". This epic story, told by a master historian, provides a rich understanding of the experience of African-American slaves, an experience that continues to mobilize American thought and passions today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674010611 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
283 p., [20] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
This work tells the story of slavery in antebellum America by moving away from the cotton plantations and into the slave market itself, the heart of the domestic slave trade. Taking the reader inside the New Orleans slave market, the largest in the nation, where 100,000 men, women, and children were packaged, priced and sold, the author transforms the statistics of this chilling trade into the human drama of traders, buyers, and slaves, negotiating sales that would alter the life of each. What emerges is not only the brutal economics of trading but the vast interdependencies among those involved. Using recently discovered material, Johnson reveals the tenuous shifts of power that occurred in the market's slave coffles and showrooms. Traders packaged their slaves by "feeding them up", dressing them well, and oiling their bodies. Johnson depicts the subtle interrelation of capitalism, paternalism, class consciousness, racism and resistance in the slave market.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674821484 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
x, 258 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
160 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
x,454 p. maps. 24cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01