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Book
x, 361 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: the second degree of slavery-- 1. The Southern origins of the Homestead Act-- 2. The demoralization of labor-- 3. Masterless (and militant) white workers-- 4. Everyday life: material realities-- 5. Literacy, education, and disfranchisement-- 6. Vagrancy, alcohol, and crime-- 7. Poverty and punishment-- 8. Race, Republicans, and vigilante violence-- 9. Class crisis and the Civil War-- Conclusion: a duel emancipation-- Appendix: numbers, percentages, and the census.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107184244 20170731
Analyzing land policy, labor, and legal history, Keri Leigh Merritt reveals what happens to excess workers when a capitalist system is predicated on slave labor. With the rising global demand for cotton - and thus, slaves - in the 1840s and 1850s, the need for white laborers in the American South was drastically reduced, creating a large underclass who were unemployed or underemployed. These poor whites could not compete - for jobs or living wages - with profitable slave labor. Though impoverished whites were never subjected to the daily violence and degrading humiliations of racial slavery, they did suffer tangible socio-economic consequences as a result of living in a slave society. Merritt examines how these 'masterless' men and women threatened the existing Southern hierarchy and ultimately helped push Southern slaveholders toward secession and civil war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107184244 20170731
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
xvi, 262 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The value of life and death
  • Preconception, women, and future increase
  • Infancy and childhood
  • Adolescence, young adulthood, and soul values
  • Midlife and older adulthood
  • Elderly and superannuated
  • Postmortem, death, and ghost values
  • Epilogue: The afterlives of slavery.
"Groundbreaking look at slaves as commodities through every phase of life, from birth to death and beyond, in early America. The Price for Their Pound of Flesh is the first book to explore the economic value of enslaved people through every phase of their lives--including from before birth to after death--in the American domestic slave trades. Covering the full "life cycle" (including preconception, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, the senior years, and death), historian Daina Berry shows the lengths to which slaveholders would go to maximize profits. She draws from over ten years of research to explore how enslaved people responded to being appraised, bartered, and sold. By illuminating their lives, Berry ensures that the individuals she studies are regarded as people, not merely commodities. Analyzing the depth of this monetization of human property will change the way we think about slavery, reparations, capitalism, and nineteenth-century medical education"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
x, 151 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Slavery, states' rights, and secession commissioners
  • The first wave
  • The South Carolinians
  • The Alabamiams
  • The mission to Virginia
  • Conclusion: apostles of disunion, apostles of racism
  • Afterword: apostles of disunion fifteen years later.
Charles Dew's Apostles of Disunion has established itself as a modern classic and an indispensable account of the Southern states' secession from the Union. Addressing topics still hotly debated among historians and the public at large more than a century and a half after the Civil War, the book offers a compelling and clearly substantiated argument that slavery and race were at the heart of our great national crisis. The fifteen years since the original publication of Apostles of Disunion have seen an intensification of debates surrounding the Confederate flag and Civil War monuments. In a powerful new afterword to this anniversary edition, Dew situates the book in relation to these recent controversies and factors in the role of vast financial interests tied to the internal slave trade in pushing Virginia and other upper South states toward secession and war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813939445 20170206
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01

4. 12 years a slave [2013]

Video
1 videodisc (approximately 134 minutes) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; surround; stereo; Dolby. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; Region 1.
Based on the true story of Solomon Northup. It is 1841, and Northup, an accomplished, free citizen of New York, is kidnapped and sold into slavery. Stripped of his identity and deprived of all dignity, Northup is ultimately purchased by ruthless plantation owner Edwin Epps and must find the strength within to survive. Filled with powerful performances by an astonishing cast including Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch, Brad Pitt, and newcomer Lupita Nyong'o, 12 Years a Slave is both an unflinching account of slavery in American history and a celebration of the indomitable power of hope.
Media & Microtext Center
AFRICAAM-252C-01, CSRE-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01, THINK-31-03
Book
279 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Exotic, seductive, and doomed: the antebellum mixed-race free woman of color has long operated as a metaphor for New Orleans. Commonly known as a "quadroon, " she and the city she represents rest irretrievably condemned in the popular historical imagination by the linked sins of slavery and interracial sex. However, as Emily Clark shows, the rich archives of New Orleans tell a different story. Free women of color with ancestral roots in New Orleans were as likely to marry in the 1820s as white women. And marriage, not concubinage, was the basis of their family structure. In "The Strange History of the American Quadroon, " Clark investigates how the narrative of the erotic colored mistress became an elaborate literary and commercial trope, persisting as a symbol that long outlived the political and cultural purposes for which it had been created. Untangling myth and memory, she presents a dramatically new and nuanced understanding of the myths and realities of New Orleans's free women of color.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469607528 20160612
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
374 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
Ira Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the 17th century to its fiery demise nearly 300 years later. Most Americans, black and white, have a singular vision of slavery, one fixed in the mid-19th century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South and subscribed to Christianity. Here, however, Berlin offers a dynamic vision, a major reinterpretation in which slaves and their owners continually renegotiated the terms of captivity. Slavery was thus made and remade by successive generations of Africans and Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately emancipation. Berlin's understanding of the processes that continually transformed the lives of slaves makes "Generations of Captivity" useful reading for anyone interested in the evolution of antebellum America. Connecting the "charter generation" to the development of Atlantic society in the 17th century, the "plantation generation" to the reconstruction of colonial society in the 18th century, the "revolutionary generation" to the age of revolutions, and the "migration generation" to American expansionism in the 19th century, Berlin integrates the history of slavery into the larger story of American life. He demonstrates how enslaved black people, by adapting to changing circumstances, prepared for the moment when they could seize liberty and declare themselves the "freedom generation". This epic story, told by a master historian, provides a rich understanding of the experience of African-American slaves, an experience that continues to mobilize American thought and passions today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674010611 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
283 p., [20] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
This work tells the story of slavery in antebellum America by moving away from the cotton plantations and into the slave market itself, the heart of the domestic slave trade. Taking the reader inside the New Orleans slave market, the largest in the nation, where 100,000 men, women, and children were packaged, priced and sold, the author transforms the statistics of this chilling trade into the human drama of traders, buyers, and slaves, negotiating sales that would alter the life of each. What emerges is not only the brutal economics of trading but the vast interdependencies among those involved. Using recently discovered material, Johnson reveals the tenuous shifts of power that occurred in the market's slave coffles and showrooms. Traders packaged their slaves by "feeding them up", dressing them well, and oiling their bodies. Johnson depicts the subtle interrelation of capitalism, paternalism, class consciousness, racism and resistance in the slave market.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674821484 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
ix, 406 pages : 1 map ; 25 cm
  • Confederates in the attic
  • North Carolina: Cats of the Confederacy
  • South Carolina: In the better half of the world
  • South Carolina: Shades of gray
  • Kentucky: Dying for Dixie
  • Virginia: A farb of the heart
  • Tennessee: At the Foote of the master
  • Tennessee: The ghost marks of Shiloh
  • Mississippi: The Minié Ball pregnancy
  • Virginia and beyond: The Civil Wargasm
  • Georgia: Gone with the window
  • Georgia: Still prisoners of war
  • Alabama: Only living Confederate widow tells some
  • Alabama: I had a dream
  • Strike the tent.
Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. He joins "hardcore" reenactors; witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war; finds that Andersonville Prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of an eccentric pilgrim. Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, this book brings alive old battlefields and new ones--classrooms, courts, country bars--where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.--From publisher description.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
216 p. ; 20 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
160 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01
Book
x,454 p. maps. 24cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-252C-01, HISTORY-252C-01