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Book
xiv, 280 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Widely considered the greatest genius of all time, Albert Einstein revolutionised our understanding of the cosmos with his general theory of relativity and helped to lead us into the atomic age. Yet in the final decades of his life he was also ignored by most working scientists, his ideas opposed by even his closest friends. This stunning downfall can be traced to Einstein's earliest successes and to personal qualities that were at first his best assets. Einstein's imagination and self-confidence served him well as he sought to reveal the universe's structure, but when it came to newer revelations in the field of quantum mechanics, these same traits undermined his quest for the ultimate truth. David Bodanis traces the arc of Einstein's intellectual development across his professional and personal life, showing how Einstein's confidence in his own powers of intuition proved to be both his greatest strength and his ultimate undoing. He was a fallible genius. An intimate and enlightening biography of the celebrated physicist, Einstein's Greatest Mistake reveals how much we owe Einstein today - and how much more he might have achieved if not for his all-too-human flaws.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408708101 20161128
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xxi, 355 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • 1. World riddle solvers-- 2. Confrontation with the theory of relativity-- 3. Debate on the content of the theory of relativity-- 4. Marginalization and protest: strategic disputes with the theory of relativity-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107017443 20160612
This detailed account of the controversy surrounding the publication of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity explores the ferocious popular and academic opposition which at one time encircled one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the twentieth century. Based on extensive archival research, this fascinating discourse includes a compelling and entertaining examination of the contemporary literature created by Einstein's detractors. Exploring the arguments and strategies, social contexts, and motivations of Einstein's detractors, and providing unique insights into the dynamics of scientific controversies, this book is ideal for anyone interested in the history and philosophy of physics, popular science, and the public understanding of science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107017443 20160612
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
x, 324 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cm
Interstellar, from acclaimed filmmaker Christopher Nolan, takes us on a fantastic voyage far beyond our solar system. Yet in The Science of Interstellar, Kip Thorne, the physicist who assisted Nolan on the scientific aspects of Interstellar, shows us that the movie's jaw-dropping events and stunning, never-before-attempted visuals are grounded in real science. Thorne shares his experiences working as the science adviser on the film and then moves on to the science itself. In chapters on wormholes, black holes, interstellar travel, and much more, Thorne's scientific insights-many of them triggered during the actual scripting and shooting of Interstellar-describe the physical laws that govern our universe and the truly astounding phenomena that those laws make possible. Interstellar and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and (c) Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (s14).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393351378 20160618
Green Library, Engineering Library (Terman)
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xix, 469 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • PART I: QUANTUM IN ACTION -- 1. An Act of Desperation: Berlin 1900 -- 2. Independent Energy Quanta: Bern 1905 -- 3. Quantum Numbers and Quantum Jumps: Manchester 1913 -- 4. Wave-particle Duality: Paris 1923 -- 5. Strangely Beautiful Interior: Helgoland 1925 -- 6. A Late Erotic Outburst: Swiss Alps 1925 -- 7. The Self-rotating Electron: Leiden 1925 -- PART II: QUANTUM PROBABILITY AND QUANTUM UNCERTAINTY -- 8. Quantum Probability: Gottingen 1926 -- 9. The Whole Idea of Quantum Jumps Necessarily Leads to Nonsense: Copenhagen 1926 -- 10. Uncertainty Principle: Copenhagen 1927 -- 11. The Copenhagen Interpretation: Copenhagen 1927 -- 12. Complementarity: Lake Como 1927 -- PART III: QUANTUM INTERPRETATION -- 13. Gedankenexperiment: Brussels 1927 -- 14. An Absolute Wonder: Cambridge 1927 -- 15. A Certain Unreasonableness: Brussels 1930 -- 16. A Bolt from the Blue: Copenhagen 1935 -- 17. The Paradox of Schrodinger's Cat: Oxford 1935 -- PART IV: QUANTUM FIELDS -- 18. Crisis: Shelter Island 1947 -- 19. Quantum Electrodynamics: Oldstone 1949 -- 20. Gauge Symmetry and Gauge Theories: Princeton 1954 -- 21. Three Quarks for Muster Mark: Pasadena 1963 -- 22. The Higgs Mechanism: Edinburgh 1965 -- PART V: QUANTUM PARTICLES -- 23. Electro-weak Unification: Harvard 1967 -- 24. Deep Inelastic Scattering: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center 1967 -- 25. Asymptotic Freedom and Quantum Chromodynamics: Harvard 1973 -- 26. The November Revolution: Brookhaven and SLAC 1974 -- 27. The W and Z Bosons: CERN 1983 -- 28. Completing the Picture: Fermilab 1994 -- PART VI: QUANTUM REALITY -- 29. Hidden Variables: Princeton 1951 -- 30. Bell's Theorem: Geneva 1964 -- 31. The Aspect Experiments: Paris 1982 -- 32. Beating the Uncertainty Principle: Albuquerque 1991 -- 33. Three-photon GHZ States: Vienna 2000 -- 34. Reality, Whether Local or Not: Vienna 2007 -- PART VII: QUANTUM GRAVITY -- 35. That Damned Equation: Princeton 1967 -- 36. The First Superstring Revolution: Aspen 1984 -- 37. The Quantum Structure of Space: Santa Barbara 1986 -- 38. No Consistency Without Contingency: Durham 1995 -- 39. The Second Superstring Revolution: Los Angeles 1995 -- 40. Resolving the Impasse: CERN 2008 -- Epilogue -- Quantum Timeline -- Name Index -- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199566846 20160605
The twentieth century was defined by physics. From the minds of the world's leading physicists there flowed a river of ideas that would transport mankind to the pinnacle of wonderment and to the very depths of human despair. This was a century that began with the certainties of absolute knowledge and ended with the knowledge of absolute uncertainty. It was a century in which physicists developed weapons with the capacity to destroy our reality, whilst at the same time denying us the possibility that we can ever properly comprehend it. Almost everything we think we know about the nature of our world comes from one theory of physics. This theory was discovered and refined in the first thirty years of the twentieth century and went on to become quite simply the most successful theory of physics ever devised. Its concepts underpin much of the twenty-first century technology that we have learned to take for granted. But its success has come at a price, for it has at the same time completely undermined our ability to make sense of the world at the level of its most fundamental constituents. Rejecting the fundamental elements of uncertainty and chance implied by quantum theory, Albert Einstein once famously declared that 'God does not play dice'. Niels Bohr claimed that anybody who is not shocked by the theory has not understood it. The charismatic American physicist Richard Feynman went further: he claimed that nobody understands it. This is quantum theory, and this book tells its story. Jim Baggott presents a celebration of this wonderful yet wholly disconcerting theory, with a history told in forty episodes - significant moments of truth or turning points in the theory's development. From its birth in the porcelain furnaces used to study black body radiation in 1900, to the promise of stimulating new quantum phenomena to be revealed by CERN's Large Hadron Collider over a hundred years later, this is the extraordinary story of the quantum world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199566846 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xvi, 542 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • The Forman Thesis-- Quantum Physics in Its Cultural Context: Revisiting the Forman Thesis-- Comparative Cases: Cross-Disciplinary and Cross-Cultural.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789814293112 20160606
This volume reprints Paul Forman's classic papers on the history of physics in post-World War I Germany and the invention of quantum mechanics. The Forman thesis has become famous as the first argument in favor of the cultural conditioning of scientific knowledge, in particular for its demonstration of the historical connection between the culture of Weimar Germany - known for its irrationality and antiscientism - and the emerging concept of quantum acausality. At the 2007 international conference in Vancouver, Canada, leading historians of physics discussed the implications of the Forman thesis in the historiography of modern science. Their papers collected in this volume represent a cutting-edge research on the history of quantum revolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789814293112 20160606
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xvi, 448 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • The quantum. The reluctant revolutionary
  • The patent slave
  • The golden Dane
  • The quantum atom
  • When Einstein met Bohr
  • The prince of duality
  • Boy physics. Spin doctors
  • The quantum magician
  • "A late erotic outburst"
  • Uncertainty in Copenhagen
  • Titans clash over reality. Solvay 1927
  • Einstein forgets relativity
  • Quantum reality
  • Does God play dice? For whom Bell's theorem tolls.
One of the best guides yet to the central conundrums of modern physics.-John Banville.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393078299 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xviii, 363 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
  • Introduction ix PART 1: Solitude and World Chapter 1: Who Was Einstein? Why Is He Still So Alive? by Gerald Holton 3 Chapter 2: A Short History of Einstein's Paradise beyond the Personal by Lorraine Daston 15 Chapter 3: Einstein's Jewish Identity by Hanoch Gutfreund 27 Chapter 4: Einstein and God by Yehuda Elkana 35 Chapter 5: Einstein's Unintended Legacy: The Critique of Common-Sense Realism and Post-Modern Politics by Yaron Ezrahi 48 Chapter 6: Subversive Einstein by Susan Neiman 59 Chapter 7: Einstein and Nuclear Weapons by Silvan S. Schweber 72 PART 2: Art and World Chapter 8: Einstein and 20th-Century Art: A Romance of Many Dimensions by Linda Dalrymple Henderson 101 Chapter 9: Rendering Time by Caroline A. Jones 130 Chapter 10: Into the Bleed: Einstein and 21st-Century Art by Matthew Ritchie 150 Chapter 11: Einstein and Music by Leon Botstein 161 Chapter 12: Seeing the Unseen by E. L. Doctorow 176 PART 3: Science and World Chapter 13: The Assassin of Relativity by Peter L. Galison 185 Chapter 14: Space, Time, and Geometry: Einstein and Logical Empiricism by Michael L. Friedman 205 Chapter 15: Einstein as a Student by Dudley Herschbach 217 Chapter 16: Learning from Einstein: Innovation in Science by Jurgen Renn 239 Chapter 17: Einstein and 'h: Advances in Quantum Mechanics by Jurg Frohlich 257 Chapter 18: Einstein's Unknown Contribution to Quantum Theory by A. Douglas Stone 270 Chapter 19: Einstein and the Quest for a Unified Theory by David Gross 287 Chapter 20: Energy in Einstein's Universe by Lisa Randall 299 Notes 311 Contributors 341 Index 349.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691135205 20160528
More than fifty years after his death, Albert Einstein's vital engagement with the world continues to inspire others, spurring conversations, projects, and research, in the sciences as well as the humanities. "Einstein for the 21st Century" shows us why he remains a figure of fascination. In this wide-ranging collection, eminent artists, historians, scientists, and social scientists describe Einstein's influence on their work, and consider his relevance for the future. Scientists discuss how Einstein's vision continues to motivate them, whether in their quest for a fundamental description of nature or in their investigations in chaos theory; art scholars and artists explore his ties to modern aesthetics; a music historian probes Einstein's musical tastes and relates them to his outlook in science; historians explore the interconnections between Einstein's politics, physics, and philosophy; and other contributors examine his impact on the innovations of our timeUniquely cross-disciplinary, "Einstein for the 21st Century" serves as a testament to his legacy and speaks to everyone with an interest in his work. The contributors are Leon Botstein, Lorraine Daston, E. L.Doctorow, Yehuda Elkana, Yaron Ezrahi, Michael L. Friedman, Jurg Frohlich, Peter L. Galison, David Gross, Hanoch Gutfreund, Linda D. Henderson, Dudley Herschbach, Gerald Holton, Caroline Jones, Susan Neiman, Lisa Randall, Jurgen Renn, Matthew Ritchie, Silvan S. Schweber, and A. Douglas Stone.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691135205 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xxii, 675, [16] p. of plates : ill., facsim., ports. ; 25 cm.
  • The light-beam rider
  • Childhood, 1879-1896
  • The Zurich Polytechnic, 1896-1900
  • The lovers, 1900-1904
  • The miracle year: quanta and molecules, 1905
  • Special relativity, 1905
  • The happiest thought, 1906-1909
  • The wandering professor, 1909-1914
  • General relativity, 1911-1915
  • Divorce, 1916-1919
  • Einstein's universe, 1916-1919
  • Fame, 1919
  • The wandering Zionist, 1920-1921
  • Nobel laureate, 1921-1927
  • Unified field theories, 1923-1931
  • Turning fifty, 1929-1931
  • Einstein's God
  • The refugee, 1932-1933
  • America, 1933-1939
  • Quantum entanglement, 1935
  • The bomb, 1939-1945
  • One-worlder, 1945-1948
  • Landmark, 1948-1953
  • Red scare, 1951-1954
  • The end, 1955
  • Epilogue: Einstein's brain and Einstein's mind.
By the author of the acclaimed bestseller 'Benjamin Franklin', this is the first full biography of Albert Einstein since all of his papers have become available. How did his mind work? What made him a genius? Isaacson's biography shows how his scientific imagination sprang from the rebellious nature of his personality. His fascinating story is a testament to the connection between creativity and freedom. Based on newly released personal letters of Einstein, this book explores how an imaginative, impertinent patent clerk - a struggling father in a difficult marriage who couldn't get a teaching job or a doctorate - became the mind reader of the creator of the cosmos, the locksmith of the mysteries of the atom and the universe. His success came from questioning conventional wisdom and marveling at mysteries that struck others as mundane. This led him to embrace a morality and politics based on respect for free minds, free spirits, and free individuals. These traits are just as vital for this new century of globalization, in which our success will depend on our creativity, as they were for the beginning of the last century, when Einstein helped usher in the modern age.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780743264730 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
276 p. : ill., facsims. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. From Myths to the Copernican Universe-- 2. The Newtonian Era-- 3. Foundations of Modern Cosmology-- 4. The Hot Big Bang-- 5. New Horizons.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199209163 20160528
This book is a historical account of how natural philosophers and scientists have endeavoured to understand the universe at large, first in a mythical and later in a scientific context. Starting with the creation stories of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, the book covers all the major events in theoretical and observational cosmology, from Aristotle's cosmos over the Copernican revolution to the discovery of the accelerating universe in the late 1990s. It presents cosmology as a subject including scientific as well as non-scientific dimensions, and tells the story of how it developed into a true science of the heavens. Contrary to most other books in the history of cosmology, it offers an integrated account of the development with emphasis on the modern Einsteinian and post-Einsteinian period. Starting in the pre-literary era, it carries the story onwards to the early years of the 21st century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199209163 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xviii, 461 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Bohr and Einstein: Einstein and Bohr-- 2. The peace before the quantum-- 3. A glance at relativity-- 4. The slow rise of the quantum-- 5. Bohr: what does it all mean?-- 6. Einstein's negative views-- 7. Bohm, Bell and experimental philosophy-- 8. A round-up of recent developments-- 9. Quantum information theory - an introduction-- 10. Bohr or Einstein?-- References-- Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521671026 20160528
Quantum theory, the most successful physical theory of all time, provoked intense debate between the twentieth century's two greatest physicists, Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein. Quantum information theory has emerged from intensive study of the structure and interpretation of quantum theory to become one of the fastest growing areas of twenty-first century science. This second edition has been extensively revised and updated to cover recent developments, including the findings of papers published since the well-received first edition. A substantial new chapter is devoted to the development and structure of quantum information theory. Developments in the experimental and theoretical study of Bell's Theorem are also covered in detail, and the accounts of ongoing work have been brought up to date. A fascinating account of the development of quantum theory, this book will appeal to anyone with an interest in the fundamental questions of physics, its philosophy and its history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521671026 20160528
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xxix, 397 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations xi List of Tables xv Preface xvii Introduction xxi Notation Convention for Angular Measure xxv Abbreviations xxvii PART ONE: 1905-1911 Early Encounters with Relativity 1 CHAPTER ONE: Einstein and the World Community of Physicists and Astronomers 3 Einstein Enters the World Stage 3 The Astronomy Community 7 The Astrophysics Revolution 9 European Brains and American Money 20 California Astronomy: The Nation's Leader 25 CHAPTER TWO: Astronomers and Special Relativity: The First Publications 28 Henry Crozier Plummer and the Problem of Aberration 28 Edmund Taylor Whittaker: Relativity and the Ether 31 Relativity and Subjectivism 36 Using Relativity to Calculate Planetary Orbits 38 American Astronomers' Introduction to Relativity 40 PART TWO: 1911-1919 Astronomers Encounter Einstein 45 CHAPTER THREE: The Early Involvement, 1911-1914 47 Einstein's Two Predictions 47 Solar Eclipses, "Vulcan, " and the Principle of Relativity 50 Einstein Finds an Astronomer 55 Puzzles in the Sun's Spectrum 65 The Russian Eclipse of 1914 76 CHAPTER FOUR: The War Period, 1914-1918 85 Troubles with Freundlich 85 Einstein's Breakthrough 87 The "Freundlich Affair" 90 News of Einstein's Breakthrough Spreads 94 Mixed Reactions to a Complicated Theory 98 Constructing the Universe 103 Challenges from Solar Observations 108 Lick Astronomers Go Eclipse Hunting 114 Einstein Liberates Freundlich 119 CHAPTER FIVE: 1919: A Year of Dramatic Announcement 125 Evershed's Earth Effect versus Relativity 125 Delays and Technical Challenges at Lick 126 Enter the British 129 The Lick Verdict: "Einstein Is Wrong" 131 The British Declare, "Einstein Is Right" 140 CHAPTER SIX: Men of Science Agog 146 Reactions to the British Eclipse Results 146 Pressure from the Press 153 The Role of Arthur Eddington 157 Einstein the National Treasure 160 Hale Realizes His Vision 165 PART THREE: 1920-1925 Astronomers Put Einstein to the Test 169 CHAPTER SEVEN: Tackling the Solar Redshift Problem 171 Evershed and St. John Declare the Case Unresolved 171 "Einstein's Third Victory" 173 Unraveling Complexities--Evershed versus St. John 175 Evershed Votes for Einstein 179 CHAPTER EIGHT: More Eclipse Testing 183 Personnel Changes at Lick 183 Conflicting Announcements on the Goldendale Results 185 Preparations for the Australian Eclipse 194 The 1922 Eclipse: All Eyes on Lick 200 CHAPTER NINE: Emergence of the Critics 213 Reactions to the Lick Results 213 T.J.J. See versus the Lick Observatory 216 An Antirelativity Coalition in the East 225 The Ether Attempts a Comeback 231 CHAPTER TEN: The Debate Intensifies 236 Another Chance to Test Einstein 236 Mount Wilson and Lick Vote for Einstein 241 The Antirelativity Campaign Gains Momentum 243 Confrontation 252 A New Line of Evidence to Test Einstein 257 PART FOUR: 1925-1930 Final Acceptance 263 CHAPTER ELEVEN: Relativity Triumphs 265 The 1925 Eclipse: Dissension in the Antirelativity Coalition 265 The Relativity Debate circa 1925 269 Announcements for and against the Ether 273 Announcement of the Sirius B Results 277 John A. Miller and the Eclipse Tests 282 Dayton C. Miller and the Ether Drift 287 The 1928 Climax: Three More Pronouncements 290 Reluctant Acceptance 296 CHAPTER TWELVE: Silencing the Critics 300 Charles Lane Poor versus the Lick Observatory 300 Antirelativists Rally in the East 307 The Final Showdown 310 EPILOGUE: The Emergence of Relativistic Cosmology 315 FINAL REFLECTIONS 321 How Scientists Accept Theories 321 Astronomers' Reception of Relativity 323 Relativity and Us 324 Notes 327 Bibliography 365 Index 385.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691123103 20170814
Einstein's Jury is the dramatic story of how astronomers in Germany, England, and America competed to test Einstein's developing theory of relativity. Weaving a rich narrative based on extensive archival research, Jeffrey Crelinsten shows how these early scientific debates shaped cultural attitudes we hold today. The book examines Einstein's theory of general relativity through the eyes of astronomers, many of whom were not convinced of the legitimacy of Einstein's startling breakthrough. These were individuals with international reputations to uphold and benefactors and shareholders to please, yet few of them understood the new theory coming from the pen of Germany's up-and-coming theoretical physicist, Albert Einstein. Some tried to test his theory early in its development but got no results. Others--through toil and hardship, great expense, and perseverance--concluded that it was wrong. A tale of international competition and intrigue, Einstein's Jury brims with detail gleaned from Crelinsten's far-reaching inquiry into the history and development of relativity. Crelinsten concludes that the well-known British eclipse expedition of 1919 that made Einstein famous had less to do with the scientific acceptance of his theory than with his burgeoning public fame. It was not until the 1920s, when the center of gravity of astronomy and physics shifted from Europe to America, that the work of prestigious American observatories legitimized Einstein's work. As Crelinsten so expertly shows, the glow that now surrounds the famous scientist had its beginnings in these early debates among professional scientists working in the glare of the public spotlight.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691123103 20170814
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xii, 228 p. : ill., facsims., ports. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
427 p. ; 24 cm.
Popular images of Albert Einstein often depict him as either an almost superhuman solitary genius or as a counter-cultural rebel. In this unique perspective on Einstein the man, sociologist of science Gerhard Sonnert argues that both popular images are simplistic and misleading because they fail to account for the impact of culture. In this scholarly yet accessible book, Sonnert examines major features of German Kultur, showing how powerful cultural influences helped to shape Einstein's life and science. Starting with a review of the evidence supporting Einstein's rebel image, Sonnert confronts it with counter-evidence that suggests his traditionalist side. The apparent contradiction is resolved through an extensive study of the cultural landscape of nineteenth-century Germany. Sonnert takes a close look at the German concept of Kultur, laying special emphasis on the related ideas of Weltanschauung and Weltbild, two German terms representing particular types of worldviews."Einstein and Culture" demonstrates how strongly Einstein's physical research program was driven by a pivotal cultural goal: the quest for the synthesis of a scientific worldview (Weltbild).His was the rebellion of the idealistic radical in the name of Kultur against its perceived failings and shortcomings. Sonnert also shows that Einstein's quest was deeply motivated by a broadly defined religious impulse. Here again, the physicist reveals himself to be a true creature of Kultur, epitomising the German scientist-priest. In conclusion, Sonnert argues that the mass exodus during the Nazi regime of German scientists and intellectuals, including Einstein, marked a demise of Kultur. However, this cataclysm also resulted in a fertile synthesis between the German Kultur-inspired science and the quite different American scientific tradition. This is a fascinating, insightful, and original study of a neglected aspect of Einstein's life and work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781591023166 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
532 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
The best selling author of FERMAT'S LAST THEOREM and THE CODE BOOK tells the story of the brilliant minds that deciphered the mysteries of the Big Bang. Albert Einstein once said: 'The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible.' Simon Singh believes geniuses like Einstein are not the only people able to grasp the physics that govern the universe. We all can. As well as explaining what the Big Bang theory actually is, the book will address why cosmologists believe that it is an accurate description of the origin of the universe. It will also tell the story of the scientists who fought against the establishment idea of an eternal and unchanging universe. Simon Singh, renowned for making difficult ideas much less difficult than they first seem, is the perfect guide for this journey. Everybody has heard of the Big Bang Theory. But how many of us can actually claim to understand it? With characteristic clarity and a narrative peppered with anecdotes and personal histories of those who have struggled to understand creation, Simon Singh has written the story of the most important theory ever.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780007152513 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01

15. Einstein in Berlin [2003]

Book
viii, 486 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
389 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Synchrony
  • Coal and chaos
  • The electric worldmap
  • Poincaré's maps
  • Einstein's clocks
  • The place of time.
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
1 online resource (viii, 279 pages)
  • Acknowledgments vii Introduction 3 CHAPTER 1 Einstein's Religiosity and the Role of Religion in His Private Life 13 CHAPTER 2 Einstein's Philosophy of Religion 65 CHAPTER 3 Einstein's Physics and Theology 153 Appendix 267 Index 269.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691102979 20180521
The philosophy of religion and the quest for spiritual truth preoccupied Albert Einstein--so much that it has been said "one might suspect he was a disguised theologian." Nevertheless, the literature on the life and work of Einstein, extensive as it is, does not provide an adequate account of his religious conception and sentiments. Only fragmentarily known, Einstein's ideas about religion have been often distorted both by atheists and by religious groups eager to claim him as one of their own. But what exactly was Einstein's religious credo? In this fascinating book, the distinguished physicist and philosopher Max Jammer offers an unbiased and well-documented answer to this question. The book begins with a discussion of Einstein's childhood religious education and the religious atmosphere--or its absence--among his family and friends. It then reconstructs, step by step, the intellectual development that led Einstein to the conceptions of a cosmic religion and an impersonal God, akin to "the God of Spinoza." Jammer explores Einstein's writings and lectures on religion and its role in society, and how far they have been accepted by the general public and by professional theologians like Paul Tillich or Frederick Ferre. He also analyzes the precise meaning of Einstein's famous dictum "Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind, " and why this statement can serve as an epitome of Einstein's philosophy of religion. The last chapter deals with the controversial question of whether Einstein's scientific work, and in particular his theory of relativity, has theologically significant implications, a problem important for those who are interested in the relation between science and religion. Both thought-provoking and engaging, this book aims to introduce readers, without proselytizing, to Einstein's religion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691102979 20180521
eReserve
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xii, 330 p. : ill., ports. ; 20 cm.
'By the end of the astonishing "E=mc2", a dedicated reader will have achieved, if only by osmosis, an understanding of Einstein's theory of relativity and feel quite at ease dining with Nobel Prize winners. It's a lucid, even thrilling study: the very best kind of science journalism. I didn't know I could know so much.' - Fay Weldon, Books of the Year, "Washington Post". In 1905, Albert Einstein produced five historic papers that shattered many cherished scientific beliefs. One of those papers introduced the theory of special relativity and his legendary equation, E=mc2. Generations have grown up knowing that equation changed the shape of our world, but without understanding what it really means and why it is so significant. In this fascinating biography, David Bodanis tells the story of one of the greatest scientific discoveries in history. He looks at the elements 'e', 'm' and 'c'; and honours the scientists whose landmark discoveries paved the way for Einstein. He plots the course of the equation through the twentieth century, showing how our lives have been revolutionized by its applications; and looks far ahead to the future. But as with any biography, it is the human stories that really ignite the subject - stories of love, courage and tragedy, of near misses, disappointments and disasters that, brought together by Bodanis in this remarkable book, turn Einstein's seemingly impenetrable theory into a dramatic and accessible human achievement. 'Both informative and highly readable..."E=mc2" is a wonderful romp through Einstein's famous formula. This is everything a popular science book should be' - "Daily Express". 'Bodanis himself seems like an intellectual thermonuclear explosion, a kind of Jonathan Miller on speed...This is an outstanding introduction to relativity by a gifted practitioner of popular science' - "Independent". 'With skill and plenty of colourful anecdotes, Bodanis traces the intellectual ancestry of E=mc2...fast moving and entertaining' - "The Times." '"E=mc2" reveals, amongst other wonders, how many women physicists were involved in the story, which makes this morally improving, as well as fascinating reading' - George Walden, Books of the Year, "Sunday Telegraph". 'The book fizzes in the readers imagination' - "Times Educational Supplement".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780330391658 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
xv, 379 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01
Book
4 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Vol. 1: The Roots of Special Relativity 0-415-93715-9: 350pp Einstein, Albert. 'On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies.' In Albert Einsteins Special Theory of Relativity: Emergence (1905) and Early Interpretation (1905-1911), translated by Arthur I. Miller (Reading, PA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1981) Holton, Gerald. 'Mach, Einstein, and the Search for Reality'. In Gerald Holton, ed., Thematic Origins of Scientific Thought: Kepler to Einstein, rev. ed. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). Holton, Gerald. 'Einstein and the Cultural Roots of Modern Science' Daedalus 127 (Winter 1998). Darrigol, Oliver. 'Henri Poincare's Criticism of Fin-de-siecle Electrodynamics'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26 (1995). Janssen, Michel. 'Reconsidering a Scientific Revolution: The Case of Einstein Versus Lorentz.' Unpublished. Miller, Arthur I. 'The Special Relativity Theory: Einstein's Response to the Physics of 1905'. In Gerald Holton and Yehudah Elkana, eds., Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1982). Galison, Peter. 'Einstein's Clocks: The Place of Time'. Critical Enquiry 26 (Winter 2000). Cassidy, David. 'Understanding the History of Special Relativity'. Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 16 (1986) Pyenson, Lewis. 'The Relativity Revolution in Germany.' In The Comparitive Reception of Relativity (Dordrecht: Reidel, 1987). Glick, Thomas. 'Cultural Issues in the Reception of Relativity (Dordrecht: Reidel, 1987) Goldberg, Stanley. 'In Defense of the Ether: The British Response to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, 1905-1911.' Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 2 (1970). Warwick, Andrew. 'Cambridge Mathematics and Cavendish Physics: Cunningham, Campbell, and Einstein's Relativity, 1905-1911. Part I: The Uses of Theory.' Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 23 (1992). Vol. 2: The Roots of General Relativity 0-415-93716-7: 350pp Einstein, Albert. 'Notes on the Origin of the General Theory of Relativity.' In Carl Seelig, ed., Ideas and Opinions (New York, NY: Crown, 1982). Stachel, John. 'Einstein's Search for the General Convariance, 1912-1915.' In Don Howard and John Stachel, eds., Einstein and the History of General Relativity (Boston, MA: Birkhauser, 1989). Norton, John. 'Einstein and Nordstrom: Some Lesser-Known Thought Experiments in Gravitation.' In John Earman, Michel Janssen, and John Norton eds., The Attraction of Gravitation: New Studies in the History of General Relativity (Boston, MA: Birkhauser, 1993). Hoefer, Carl. 'Einstein's Struggle for a.
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  • Einstein, Albert. 'Notes on the Origin of the General Theory of Relativity.' In Carl Seelig, ed., Ideas and Opinions (New York, NY: Crown, 1982). Stachel, John. 'Einstein's Search for the General Convariance, 1912-1915.' In Don Howard and John Stachel, eds., Einstein and the History of General Relativity (Boston, MA: Birkhauser, 1989). Norton, John. 'Einstein and Nordstrom: Some Lesser-Known Thought Experiments in Gravitation.' In John Earman, Michel Janssen, and John Norton eds., The Attraction of Gravitation: New Studies in the History of General Relativity (Boston, MA: Birkhauser, 1993). Hoefer, Carl. 'Einstein's Struggle for a Machian Gravitation Theory.' Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 25 (1994). Renn, Jurgen and Tilman Sauer. 'Heuristics and Mathematical Representation in Einstein's Search for a Gravitational Field Equation.' In H. Goenner, J.Renn, J. Ritter, and T. Sauer, eds., The Expanding Worlds of General Relativity (Boston-- Birkhauser, 1999). Pais, Abraham. 'Subtle is the Lord...' In The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1982). Earman, John and Clark Glymour. 'Relativity Eclipses: The British Eclipse Expediation of 1919 and their Predecessors.' Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 11 (1980). Hentschel, Klaus. 'Einstein's attitude towards experiments: Testing Relativity Theory, 1907-1927.' In Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 23 (1992). Graham, Loren. 'The Reception of Einstein's Ideas: Two Examples from Contrasting Political Cultures.' In Gerald Holton and Yehudah Elkana, eds., Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1982). Eisenstaedt, Jean. 'The Low Water Mark of General Relativity, 1925-1955.' In Don Howard and John Stachel, eds., Einstein and the History of General Relativity (Boston, MA Birkhauser, (1989). Kaiser, David. 'A Psi is just a Psi? Practice, Pedagogy, and the Reconstitution of General Relativity, 1942-1975.' Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 29 (1998).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415937160 20160527
  • Einstein, Albert. 'On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies.' In Albert Einsteins Special Theory of Relativity: Emergence (1905) and Early Interpretation (1905-1911), translated by Arthur I. Miller (Reading, PA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1981) Holton, Gerald. 'Mach, Einstein, and the Search for Reality'. In Gerald Holton, ed., Thematic Origins of Scientific Thought: Kepler to Einstein, rev. ed. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988). Holton, Gerald. 'Einstein and the Cultural Roots of Modern Science' Daedalus 127 (Winter 1998). Darrigol, Oliver. 'Henri Poincare's Criticism of Fin-de-siecle Electrodynamics'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 26 (1995). Janssen, Michel. 'Reconsidering a Scientific Revolution: The Case of Einstein Versus Lorentz.' Unpublished. Miller, Arthur I. 'The Special Relativity Theory: Einstein's Response to the Physics of 1905'. In Gerald Holton and Yehudah Elkana, eds., Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1982). Galison, Peter. 'Einstein's Clocks: The Place of Time'. Critical Enquiry 26 (Winter 2000). Cassidy, David. 'Understanding the History of Special Relativity'. Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 16 (1986) Pyenson, Lewis. 'The Relativity Revolution in Germany.' In The Comparitive Reception of Relativity (Dordrecht: Reidel, 1987). Glick, Thomas. 'Cultural Issues in the Reception of Relativity (Dordrecht: Reidel, 1987) Goldberg, Stanley. 'In Defense of the Ether: The British Response to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, 1905-1911.' Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 2 (1970). Warwick, Andrew. 'Cambridge Mathematics and Cavendish Physics: Cunningham, Campbell, and Einstein's Relativity, 1905-1911. Part I: The Uses of Theory.' Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 23 (1992).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415937153 20160527
  • Fortun, Michael and Sylvan S. Schweber. 'Scientists and the State: The Legacy of World War II.' In Kostas Gavroglu, Jean Christianidis, and Efthymios Nicolaidis, eds., Trends in the Historiography of Science (Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1994). Hales, Peter Bacon. 'Construction.' In Atomic Spaces: Living on the Manhattan Project (Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1997). Hoddeson, Lillian. 'Mission Change in the Large Laboratory: The Los Alamos Implosion Program, 1943-1945.' In Peter Galison and Bruce Hevly, eds., The Growth of Large-Scale Research (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1992). Easlea, Brian. 'The Fathering of the Monster: The Manhattan Project.' In Fathering the Unthinkable: Masculinity, Scientists and the Nuclear Arms Race (London, UK: Pluto Press, 1983). Price, Matt. 'Roots of Dissent: The Chicago Met Lab and the Origins of the Franck Report.' Isis 86 (1995). Gallison , Peter. 'The Ontology of the Enemy: Norbert Wiener and the Cybernetic Vision.' Critical Enquiry 21 (1994). Forman, Paul. ' Behind Quantum Electronics: National Security as Basis for Physical Research in the United States, 1940-1960.' Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences 18 (1987). MacKenzie, Donald. 'The Construction of Technical Facts.' In Inventing Accuracy: A Historical Sociology of Nuclear Missile Guidance (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1990). Gusterson, Hugh. 'Nuclear Weapons Testing: Scientific Experiment as Political Ritual.' In Laura Nader, ed., Naked Science: Anthropological Inquiry into Boundaries, Power, and Knowledge (New York, NY: Routledge, 1996). Kevles, Daniel J. 'Preface, 1995: The Death of the Superconducting Super Collider in the Life of American Physics.' In The Physicists: The History of a Scientific Community in Modern America (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1971).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415937177 20160527
  • Kuhn, Thomas. 'Revisiting Planck.' Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 14 (1984). Klein, Martin. 'Thermodynamics in Einstein's Thought.' Science 157 (1967). Klein, Martin. 'Einstein, Specific Heats, and the Early Quantum Theory.' Science 148 (1965). Darrigol, Olivier. 'Classsical Concepts in Bohr's Atomic Theory (1913-1925).' Physis 32 (1997). MacKinnon, Edward. 'Heisenberg, Models, and the Rise of Matrix Mechanics.' Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 8 (1977). Wessels, Linda. 'Schrodinger's Route to Wave Mechanics.' Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 10 (1977). Cassidy, David. 'Heisenberg, Uncertainty, and the Quantum Revolution.' Scientific American 266 (May 1992). Kragh, Helge. 'The Genesis of Dirac's Relativistic Theory of Electrons.' Archive for History of Exact Sciences 24 (1981). Forman, Paul. 'Weimar Culture, Causality, and Quantum Theory, 1918-1927: Adaptation by German Physicists and Mathematicians to a Hostile Intellectual Environment.' In Colin Chant and John Fauvel, eds., Darwin to Einstein: Historical Studies on Science and Belief (New York, NY: Longman, 1980). Beller, Mara. 'Born's Probabilistic Interpretation: A Case Study of 'Concepts in Flux''. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 21 (1990). Holton, Gerald. 'The Roots of Complementarity.' Daedalus 99 (1970). Heilbron, John. 'The Earliest Missionaries of the Copenhagen Spirit.' Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 38 (1985). Wise, M. Norton. 'Pascual Jordan: Quantum Mechanics, Psychology, National Socialism.' In Mark Walker and Monika Rechenberg, eds., Science, Technology, and National Socialism. (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1994). Fine, Arthur. 'Einstein's Critique of Quantum Theory: The Roots and Significance of EPR.' In P. Barker and C.G. Shugart, eds., After Einstein (Memphis, TN: Memphis State University Press, 1981). Assmus, Alexi. 'The Americanization of Molecular Physics.' Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 23 (1992).
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Modern science has changed every aspect of life in ways that cannot be compared to developments in previous eras. This four-volume set presents key developments within modern physical science and the effects of these discoveries on modern global life. The first two volumes explore the history of the concept of relativity, the cultural roots of science, the concept of time and gravity before, during, and after Einstein's theory and the cultural reception of relativity. Volume Three explores the impact of modern science upon global politics and the creation of a new kind of war, and Volume Four details the old and new efforts surrounding the elucidation of the quantum world, as well as the cultural impact of particle physics. The collection also presents the historical and cultural context that made these scientific innovations possible. The transformation of everyday concepts of time and space for the individual and for society, the conduct of warfare, and the modern sense of mastering nature are all issues discussed in these four volumes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415937146 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-241D-01, HISTORY-341D-01