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Video
1 videodisc (113 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Media & Microtext Center
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Video
1 videodisc (125 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
The tale of a 1943 WWII French Algerian Unit facing discrimination by its European counterparts due to prejudice and ignorance. The French armed forces are preparing to land troops in Europe to win back their homeland from the Axis Powers, but they cannot accomplish their task without recruiting men from their African colonies. The Africans themselves start their long journey full of hope and anticipation, but as they get closer to their goal they realize that their enemy is not necessarily the Germans.
Media & Microtext Center
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Video
1 videodisc (140 min.) : sd, col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
Two thematically linked films, House (50 min.) and A house in Jerusalem (90 min.) explore the history of a house in the city's German Colony and the changes in ownership it has undergone as a microcosm for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Produced yet censored by Israel Broadcasting Authority, the first film House (Bayit) (1980) chronicles the inhabitants of the house, abandoned during the 1948 war by a Palestinian doctor and requisitioned by the Israeli government as "vacant." Eighteen years later, Gitai returns in A House in Jerusalem (1998) to observe the changes in the new residents as well as in the neighborhood.
Media & Microtext Center
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Video
1 videodisc (113 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Three very different women live together in a hotel in the heart of Algiers.
Media & Microtext Center
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Video
1 videodisc (88 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
Film about intrigue and assassination between French OAS and Algerian FLN revolutionaries in Geneva during the Algerian crisis of 1958.
Media & Microtext Center
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Book
xxxviii, 277 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Some ideas about what prevents the French from having good colonies (1833)
  • First letter on Algeria (23 June 1837)
  • Second letter on Algeria (22 August 1837)
  • Notes on the Koran (March 1838)
  • Notes on the voyage to Algeria in 1841
  • Essay on Algeria (October 1841)
  • Intervention in the debate over the appropriation of special funding (1846)
  • First report on Algeria (1847)
  • Second report on Algeria (1847)
  • The emancipation of slaves (1843).
After completing his research for "Democracy in America", Alexis de Tocqueville turned to the French consolidation of its empire in North Africa, which he believed deserving of similar attention. Tocqueville began studying Algerian history and culture, making two trips to Algeria in 1841 and 1847. He quickly became one of France's foremost experts on the country and wrote dozens of essays, articles, official letters and parliamentary reports on such diverse topics as France's military and administrative policies in North Africa, the people of the Maghrib, his own travels in Algeria, and the practice of Islam. Throughout, Tocqueville consistently defended the French imperial project, a position that stands in tension with his admiration for the benefits of democracy he witnessed in America. Although Tocqueville never published a book-length study of French North Africa, his various writings on the subject provide a valuable portrait of French imperialism. In this volume, Jennifer Pitts has selected and translated nine of his most important dispatches on Algeria, which offer insights into both Tocqueville's political thought and French liberalism's attitudes toward the political, military and moral aspects of France's colonial expansion. Also included in this collection is Tocqueville's influential call for the abolition of slavery in the French West Indies, an action he felt would regain for France the moral high ground taken by Britain when it abolished slavery in its colonies - even as the conquest and settling of Algeria would unify the French nation and gain for it international respect. Tocqueville, Pitts writes, "was quick to appreciate the novelty of colonial warfare and administration, and he devoted careful and sometimes chillingly dispassionate study to questions about the means of colonization." Pitts points out the "remarkable mixture of cruelty and sensibility" in Tocqueville's writings on empire, which often seems at odds with the popular image of Tocqueville as the champion of democracy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801865091 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Book
li, 340 p. : maps ; 22 cm.
'This honest man, this good man, this man who never did wrong to anyone, who devoted his life to the public good, and who was one of the greatest writers in Algeria, has been murdered...Not by accident, not by mistake, but called by his name and killed with preference.' So wrote Germaine Tillion in Le Monde shortly after Mouloud Feraoun's assassination by a right wing French terrorist group, the Organisation Armee Secrete, just three days before the official cease-fire ended Algeria's eight-year battle for independence from France. However, not even the gunmen of the OAS could prevent Feraoun's journal from being published."Journal, 1955-1962" appeared posthumously in French in 1962 and remains the single most important account of everyday life in Algeria during decolonization. Feraoun was one of Algeria's leading writers. He was a friend of Albert Camus, Emmanuel Robles, Pierre Bourdieu, and other French and North African intellectuals. A committed teacher, he had dedicated his life to preparing Algeria's youth for a better future. As a Muslim and Kabyle writer, his reflections on the war in Algeria afford penetrating insights into the nuances of Algerian nationalism, as well as into complex aspects of intellectual, colonial, and national identity.Feraoun's "Journal" captures the heartbreak of a writer profoundly aware of the social and political turmoil of the time. This classic account, now available in English, should be read by anyone interested in the history of European colonialism and the tragedies of contemporary Algeria. James D. Le Sueur is an assistant professor of history at the University of La Verne. He is the editor of "The Decolonization Reader" and "The Decolonization Sourcebook". Mary Ellen Wolf is an associate professor of French at New Mexico State University and the author of "Eros under Glass: Psychoanalysis" and "Mallarme's 'Herodiade'". Claude Fouillade is an associate professor of French at New Mexico State University.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803269033 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01
Book
xiv, 158 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction-- l. Foundations-- 2. Telling places: the house as social architecture-- 3. Telling people: the house and the world-- 4. Domestic time-- 5. The poetics of remembrance.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521418911 20160528
Recalling how they lived in a single house that was occupied by several Jewish and Muslim families, in the generation before Algerian independence, Joelle Bahloul's informants build up a multivocal micro-history of a way of life which came to an end in the early 1960s. Uprooted and dispersed, these former neighbours constantly refer back to the architecture of the house itself, which, with its internal boundaries and shared spaces, structures their memories. Here, in miniature, is a domestic history of North African Muslims, Jews, and Christians living under French colonial rule.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521418911 20160528
Green Library
CSRE-249-01, FEMGEN-37S-01, FRENCH-157-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, HISTORY-37S-01, JEWISHST-249-01

9. The first man [1995]

Book
viii, 325 p. ; 21 cm
Traces the story of Jacques Cormery, a young man who rises above the losses and misfortunes of his childhood in Algeria.
Green Library
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01, PWR-1LC-01
Video
2 videocassettes (180 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.
A story of love and war set in the Sahara Desert of 1911.
Media & Microtext Center
CSRE-249-01, FRENCH-249-01, HISTORY-239G-01, JEWISHST-249-01