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Book
xiii, 412 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Preface-- 1. Introduction-- PART I C. 400-C1500-- 2. Urban Trends-- 3. Economy-- 4. Social Life-- 5. Culture and Landscape-- 6. Governance-- PART II C. 1500-1800-- 7. Urban Trends-- 8. Economy-- 9. Social Life-- 10. Culture and Landscape-- 11. Governance-- PART III C. 1800-2000-- 12. Urban Trends-- 13. Economy-- 14. Social Life-- 15. Culture and Landscape-- 16. Governance-- Select Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199562732 20160528
Since the Middle Ages Europe has been one of the most urbanized continents on the planet and Europe's cities have firmly stamped their imprint on the continent's economic, social, political, and cultural life. This study of European cities and towns from the fall of the Roman Empire to the present day looks both at regional trends from across Europe and also at the widely differing fortunes of individual communities on the roller coaster of European urbanization. Taking a wide-angled view of the continent that embraces northern and eastern Europe as well as the city systems of the Mediterranean and western Europe, it addresses important debates ranging from the nature of urban survival in the post-Roman era to the position of the European city in a globalizing world. The book is divided into three parts, dealing with the middle ages, the early modern period, and the nineteenth and twentieth centuries - with each part containing chapters on urban trends, the urban economy, social developments, cultural life and landscape, and governance.Throughout, the book addresses key questions such as the role of migration, including that of women and ethnic minorities; the functioning of competition and emulation between cities, as well as issues of inter-urban cooperation; the different ways civic leaders have sought to promote urban identity and visibility; the significance of urban autonomy in enabling cities to protect their interests against the state; and not least why European cities and towns over the period have been such pressure cookers for new ideas and creativity, whether economic, political, or cultural.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199562732 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-232G-01, HISTORY-332G-01
Book
xv, 307 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
"Law, City, and King" provides important new insights into the transformation of political participation and consciousness among urban notables who bridged the gap between local society and the state in early modern France. Breen's detailed research shows how the educated, socially-middling avocats who staffed Dijon's municipality used law, patronage, and the other resources at their disposal to protect the city council's authority and their own participation in local governance.Drawing on juridical and historical authorities, the avocats favored a traditional conception of limited "absolute" monarchy increasingly at odds with royal ideology. Despite their efforts to resist the monarchy's growth, the expansion of royal power under Louis XIV eventually excluded Dijon's avocats from the French state. In opening up new perspectives on the local workings of the French state and the experiences of those who participated in it, "Law, City, and King" recasts debates about absolutism and early modern state formation. By focusing on the political alienation of notables who had long linked the crown to provincial society, Breen explains why Louis XIV's collaborative absolutism did not endure.At the same time, the book's examination of lawyers' political activities and ideas provides insights into the transformation of French political culture in the decades leading up to the French Revolution. Michael P. Breen is associate professor of history and humanities at Reed College in Portland, Oregon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781580462365 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-232G-01, HISTORY-332G
Book
xxv, 483 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-232G-01, HISTORY-332G-01
Book
220 p.
Challenges the traditional view of castas (members of the caste system created by Spanish overlords) as alienated and dominated by a desire to improve their status. This text argues that instead, social control by the Spanish rested on patron-client networks.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299140441 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-232G-01, HISTORY-332G-01
Book
vii, 294 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
This collection of twenty-one essays, written by colleagues and former students of the architectural historian Spiro Kostof (1936-1991), presents case studies on Kostof's model of urban forms and fabrics. The essays are remarkably diverse: the range includes pre-Columbian Inca settlements, 14th-century Cairo, 19th-century New Orleans, and 20th-century Tokyo. Focusing on individual streets around the world and from different historical periods, the collection is an inviting overview of the street as an urban institution. The theme of the volume is that the street presents itself as the basic structuring device of a city's form and also as the locus of its civilization. Each essay is an investigation of a single urban street with unique historical conditions. The authors' shared concern regarding anthropological, political and technical aspects of street making coalesce into a critical discourse on urban space.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520085503 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-232G-01, HISTORY-332G-01
Book
xiv, 356 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-232G-01, HISTORY-332G-01