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Book
x, 356 pages ; 25 cm
  • Lviv/Lwów/Lemberg before 1939
  • The first Soviet Lviv, 1939-1941
  • The Lemberg of Nazism: German occupation, 1941-1944
  • After Lemberg: the end of the end of Lwów and the making of Lviv
  • The founding of industrial Lviv: factories and identities
  • Local minds
  • Lviv's last synagogue, 1944-1962
  • A Soviet borderland of time.
"This book is a local and transnational study of the twentieth-century experience of a Central European borderland city with four key forces of European and global twentieth-century history: Soviet Communism, Soviet nation-shaping (here, Ukrainization), nationalism, and Nazism. It examines a fundamental layer in the making of modern Lviv by focusing on its World-War-Two and postwar transformation from an important multi-ethnic city (formerly known, mostly, as Lw[o acute]w and Lemberg) into a Soviet and Ukrainian urban center"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Video
1 videodisc (ca. 145 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Leopold Socha is a sewer worker and petty thief in Lvov, a Nazi occupied city in Poland. One day he encounters a group of Jews trying to escape the liquidation of the ghetto. He hides them for money in the labyrinth of the town's sewers beneath the bustling activity of the city above. What starts out as a straightforward and cynical business arrangement turns into something very unexpected, the unlikely alliance between Socha and the Jews as the enterprise seeps deeper into Socha's conscience.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Video
1 videodisc (144 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Leopold Socha is a sewer worker and petty thief in Lvov, a Nazi occupied city in Poland. One day he encounters a group of Jews trying to escape the liquidation of the ghetto. He hides them for money in the labyrinth of the town's sewers beneath the bustling activity of the city above. What starts out as a straightforward and cynical business arrangement turns into something very unexpected, the unlikely alliance between Socha and the Jews as the enterprise seeps deeper into Socha's conscience.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
xl, 508 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix A Note on Names xi Prologue A Dual Tragedy xiii The Destruction of Breslau xvii Poland's Shift to the West xxxi Introduction 1 PART ONE: The Postwar Era: Rupture and Survival Chapter One: Takeover 17 A Fait Accompli 17 The Mission of the Government Plenipotentiaries 20 "Noah's Ark" in Krakow 22 Poles and Russians-A Secret Hostility 29 Russians and Germans-An Unsettling Friendship 36 The Patriotic Reorganization of the Church 43 Chapter Two: Moving People 53 The Evacuation of the Germans 62 The Settlement of the Poles 65 The Resettlement Apparatus and the Migration of Peoples 74 Searching for Urban Settlers 89 The Ruralization of the City 98 Chapter Three: A Loss of Substance 105 Vandalism and the Great Fires 106 Soviet Dismantling 110 The "Szabrownicy" and the Black Market 118 Polish Dismantling 126 The Decay of Residential Housing 132 Chapter Four: Reconstruction 140 Wroc?aw between Provincial City and Bustling Metropolis 140 Momentum and Stagnation 143 Raising the Old Town from Its Ashes 153 1956 and a Changing Building Policy 160 PART TWO: The Politics of the Past: The City's Transformation Chapter Five The Impermanence Syndrome 171 An Alien Place 173 A Motley Society 178 The Capital of Poland's "Wild West" 181 Sitting on Packed Suitcases 186 Chapter Six Propaganda as Necessity 190 The Tradition of Polish Western Thought (My?l Zachodnia) 191 Nationalism and Communism in the People's Republic 194 The Advocates of Western Thought 198 The Phases of Propaganda 207 Language Conventions 212 The Success of Propaganda and the Requirements of the Time 215 Chapter Seven: Mythicizing History 217 The Land of the Piasts 222 Wroc?aw's Eternal Ties to Poland 227 Prussia's Conquest and Wroc?aw's Decline 229 A Bastion of Polishness 232 From Friedrich II to Hitler: German Continuities 236 The Pioneers of 1945 240 Migrations 241 Chapter Eight Cleansing Memory 244 Polonization: Places, Streets, and People 244 De-Germanization: Inscriptions, Monuments, Cemeteries 266 Chapter Nine The Pillars of an Imagined Tradition 288 A New Coat of Arms 294 The Power of Old Monuments and the Placelessness of New Ones 297 The Noisy Silence of Local Historiography 310 The Ritual of Commemoration 317 Chapter Ten: Old Town, New Contexts 323 Warsaw as a Model 325 The Sacralization of the Gothic 329 The Toleration of the Baroque 348 The Anti-Prussian Reflex 360 Historic Buildings and Forced Migration 372 PART THREE: Prospects Chapter Eleven: Amputated Memory and the Turning Point of 1989 381 The City without a Memory 382 The Revolution in German-Polish Relations 385 The Fall of Communism and the Discovery of the Bourgeois City 393 Wroc?aw's Search for a New Local Identity 402 Appendix 1 List of Abbreviations 409 Appendix 2 Translations of Polish Institutions 411 Appendix 3 List of Polish and German Street Names 412 Notes 417 Sources and Literature 459 Map of Poland after the Westward Shift of 1945 494 Simplified Map of Wroc?aw Today 495 Index 497.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691140247 20160607
With the stroke of a pen at the Potsdam Conference following the Allied victory in 1945, Breslau, the largest German city east of Berlin, became the Polish city of Wroclaw. Its more than six hundred thousand inhabitants - almost all of them ethnic Germans - were expelled and replaced by Polish settlers from all parts of prewar Poland. "Uprooted" examines the long-term psychological and cultural consequences of forced migration in twentieth-century Europe through the experiences of Wroclaw's Polish inhabitants. In this pioneering work, Gregor Thum tells the story of how the city's new Polish settlers found themselves in a place that was not only unfamiliar to them but outright repellent given Wroclaw's Prussian-German appearance and the enormous scope of wartime destruction. The immediate consequences were an unstable society, an extremely high crime rate, rapid dilapidation of the building stock, and economic stagnation. This changed only after the city's authorities and a new intellectual elite provided Wroclaw with a Polish founding myth and reshaped the city's appearance to fit the postwar legend that it was an age-old Polish city. Thum also shows how the end of the Cold War and Poland's democratization triggered a public debate about Wroclaw's "amputated memory". Rediscovering the German past, Wroclaw's Poles reinvented their city for the second time since World War II. "Uprooted" traces the complex historical process by which Wroclaw's new inhabitants revitalized their city and made it their own.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691140247 20160607
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
viii, 224 p. ; 20 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The Setting-- 2. 1917: The Revolutions of February and October-- 3. The Civil War-- 4. NEP and the Future of the Revolution-- 5. Stalin's Revolution-- 6. Ending the Revolution-- Notes-- Select Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199237678 20160528
The Russian Revolution had a decisive impact on the history of the twentieth century. In the years following the collapse of the Soviet regime and the opening of its archives, it has become possible to step back and see the full picture. This fully updated new edition of Sheila Fitzpatrick's classic short history of the Russian Revolution takes into account the new archival and other evidence that has come to light since then, incorporating material that was previously inaccessible not only to Western but also to Soviet historians Starting with an overview of the roots of the revolution, Fitzpatrick takes the story from 1917, through Stalin's 'revolution from above', to the great purges of the 1930s. She tells a gripping story of a Marxist revolution that was intended to transform the world, visited enormous suffering on the Russian people, and, like the French Revolution before it, ended up by devouring its own children.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199237678 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
xiv, 312 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
The First World War deprived Britain of three-quarters of a million soldiers, with as many more incapacitated. In 1919 a generation of women who unquestioningly believed marriage to be their birthright discovered that there were, quite simply, not enough men to go round. The press ran alarming stories about the 'Problem of the Surplus Women - Two Million who can never become Wives ...'. But behind the headlines were thousands of brave, emancipated individuals forced by a tragedy of historic proportions to rethink their entire futures. Tracing their fates, Virginia Nicholson shows how the single woman of the inter-war decades had to stop depending on men for her income, her identity and her happiness. Some just endured, others challenged the conventions, fought the system and found fulfilment. "Singled Out" pays homage to this remarkable generation of women who were changed by war, and in their turn helped change society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780670915644 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
261 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, HISTORY-238D-01, HISTORY-338D-01, JEWISHST-22S-01, JEWISHST-288D-01, JEWISHST-388D-01
Book
xxi, 346 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
A serious and important work on the power of using words to incite hatred and the need to stand up against those who hide behind their words to manipulate others, as told through the author's account of her courtroom battle with Holocaust denier David Irving. Deborah Lipstadt chronicles her five-year legal battle with David Irving that culminated in a sensational trial in 2000. In her acclaimed 1993 book Denying the Holocaust, Deborah Lipstadt called David Irving, a prolific writer of books on World War II, "one of the most dangerous spokespersons for Holocaust denial", a conclusion she reached after closely examining his books, speeches, interviews, and other copious records. The following year, after Lipstadt's book was published in the UK, Irving filed a libel suit against Lipstadt and her UK publisher, Penguin. Lipstadt prepared her defence with the help of first-rate team of solicitors, historians, and experts. The dramatic trial, which unfolded over the course of 10 weeks, ultimately exposed the prejudice, extremism, and distortion of history that defined Irving's work. Lipstadt's victory was proclaimed on the front page of major newspapers around the world, with the Daily Telegraph proclaiming that the trial did "for the new century what the Nuremberg tribunals or the Eichmann trial did for earlier generations." Part history, part real life courtroom drama, History On Trial is Lipstadt's riveting, blow-by-blow account of the trial that tested the standards of historical and judicial truths and resulted in a formal denunciation of a Holocaust denier, crippling the movement for years to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780060593766 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
483 p. ; 20 cm.
  • (TO BE CONFIRMED)-- 1. The Legacy of Humiliation: Poland Since the Second World War-- 2. The Legacy of Defeat: Poland's Wartime Experience, 1939-1947-- 3. The Legacy of Disenchantment: Poland's Experiment in Independence, 1914-1939-- 4. The Legacy of Spiritual Mastery: Poland During the Partitions, 1795-1918-- 5. The Legacy of An Ancient Culture: Poland before 1795-- 6. Echoes: The Past In Poland's Present-- 7. Beyond History.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780192801265 20160528
The image of Poland has once again been impressed on European consciousness. Norman Davies provides a key to understanding the modern Polish crisis in this lucid and authoritative description of the nation's history. Beginning with the period since 1945, he travels back in time to highlight the long-term themes and traditions which have influenced present attitudes. His evocative account reveals Poland as the heart of Europe in more than the geographical sense. It is a country where Europe's ideological conflicts are played out in their most acute form: as recent events have emphasized, Poland's fate is of vital concern to European civilization as a whole. This revised and updated edition tackles and analyses the issues arising from the fall of the Eastern Block, and looks at Poland's future within a political climate of democracy and free market.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780192801265 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Video
1 videodisc (125 min.) : sd., b&w. ; 4 3/4 in.
In 1942, Tono and his wife are struggling because of his antipathy towards the fascist regime. His brother-in-law, the local fuehrer, chooses Tono to oversee a button shop owned by a sweet, harmless Jewish widow, Mrs. Lautman. Unable to explain his position to Mrs. Lautman, Tono gradually accepts her belief that he is her assistant. When the Jews are ordered deported, the well-meaning Tono decides to shield her from the Nazis.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Video
1 videodisc (80 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
The first in a series of comedies about the history of the Pawlak and Kargul families. This is a story about an ongoing conflict between the Pawlaks' and the Karguls'. Before WWII, Kargul's cow crossed into the Pawlak's pasture, which led to a couple of Pawlak's barns burning down, blood being shed, and Jaśko Pawlak emigrating to America to escape punishment for cutting Kargul with a scythe. The conflict between the two families lives on when they are resettled by the government on adjacent farms.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
viii, 151 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Book
x, 363 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
In this classic work Paul Fussell illuminates the British experience on the Western Front from 1914 to 1918, focusing primarily on the literary means by which the Great War has been remembered, conventionalized, and mythologized. Drawing on the work of important wartime poets such as David Jones and Wilfred Owen, on the memoirs of Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, and Edmund Blunden, and on numerous other personal records housed in the Imperial War Museum, this award-winning volume provides an intimate and intensely poetic account of an event that revolutionized the way we see the world. This book is intended for students, historians, andgeneral readers interested in the history of the Great War and its literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195021714 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Green Library
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-22S-01, JEWISHST-22S-01