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Book
xii, 146 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
  • Preface -- Introduction -- 1. GETTING STARTED -- 1.A. Explore Your Interests -- 1.B. Find a Historical Motive -- 1.C. Focus Your Interests Early -- 1.D. Work with Bibliographies -- 1.E. Search Preselected Databases on the Internet -- 1.F. Use Reference Sources to Begin a Project -- 1.G. Conduct a General Search on the Internet -- 1.H. Scan the Search Results -- 1.I. Get a Quick First Impression -- 1.J. Critically Assess Sources on the Internet -- 1.K. Speak with a Librarian -- 1.L. Speak with Your Professor -- 1.M. Approach Your Topic from a Particular Angle -- 1.N. Browse for More Sources -- 1.O. Form a Hypothesis -- 1.P. Craft a Proposal -- 1.Q. Write an Annotated Bibliography -- 1.R. Talk to People about Your Topic -- 1.S. If You Have to Abandon a Topic, Do It Early -- Flowchart Chapter 1: Constructing an Argument Based on Sources -- 2. INTERPRETING SOURCE MATERIALS -- 2.A. Distinguish Primary Sources from Secondary Works -- 2.B. Refine Your Hypothesis with Who, What, Why, Where, and When -- 2.C. Be Sensitive to Points of View in Your Sources -- 2.D. Select the Most Important Source Materials -- 2.E. Take Notes by Being Selective -- Flowchart Chapter 2: Taking Notes -- 3. WRITING HISTORY FAITHFULLY -- 3.A. Collect and Report Your Sources Carefully -- 3.B. Incorporate the Ideas of Others with Care and Respect -- 3.C. Know the Difference between Summaries and Paraphrases -- 3.D. Learn How and When to Quote -- 3.E. Use Ellipses and Brackets, but Do Justice to Your Sources -- 3.F. Learn How to Use Quotation Marks -- 3.G. Don't Plagiarize -- 3.H. Be Honest, but Don't Give Unnecessary Citations -- 3.I. Choose a Citation System That Suits Your Audience -- Exercise: How to Cite -- 4. USE SOURCES TO MAKE INFERENCES -- 4.A. Be True to Recognized Facts -- 4.B. Transform Facts into Evidence -- 4.C. Check Your Facts -- 4.D. Check the Internal Consistency of Primary Sources -- 4.E. Check Primary Sources Against Each Other -- 4.F. Compare Primary Sources with Secondary Works -- 4.G. Conduct Interviews Systematically -- 4.H. Compare Sources to Make Inferences -- 4.I. Make Inferences from Visual and Material Sources -- 4.J. Move from Inferences to Arguments -- 4.K. Make Reasonable Inferences from Your Sources -- 4.L. Make Inferences That Are Warranted -- 4.M. Avoid Unwarranted Comparisons -- 4.N. Avoid Anachronistic Inferences -- Flowchart Chapter 4: Understanding Sources -- 5. GET WRITING! GET ORGANIZED -- 5.A. Craft a Thesis Statement -- 5.B. Create a Draft Outline of an Analytical Essay -- 5.C. Create a Draft Outline of a Narrative Essay -- 5.D. Complete Your Outline -- 5.E. Start to Write a First Draft -- 5.F. Grab Your Reader's Attention, but Do It Gently -- 5.G. State Your Intellectual Interests Early -- 5.H. Review the Historical Literature -- 5.I. Build Your Essay with Good Paragraphs -- 5.J. Define Your Key Terms Early -- 5.K. Set an Appropriate Tone -- 5.L. Treat Other Writers with Consideration -- 5.M. Account for Counterarguments -- 5.N. Lead Your Readers to an Interesting Conclusion -- Flowchart Chapter 5: Writing Your First Draft -- 6. NARRATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR HISTORIANS -- 6.A. Combine Chronology with Causation -- 6.B. Get a Sense of Change and Continuity -- 6.C. Select the Key Participants in Your Story -- 6.D. Find Your Own Voice as a Narrator -- 6.E. Choose Your Own Beginning and End -- 6.F. Write a Narrative with Well-Chosen Details -- 6.G. Write a Narrative to Support an Argument -- Flowchart Chapter 6: Representing the Past -- 7. WRITING SENTENCES IN HISTORY -- 7.A. Choose Verbs That Are Precise -- 7.B. Make Passive Sentences Active -- 7.C. Write in the Past Tense -- 7.D. Avoid Split Infinitives If You Can -- 7.E. Put Verbs in Your Sentences -- 7.F. Put Your Ideas in an Intelligible Order -- 7.G. Begin a Sentence on Common Ground and Gradually Build a New Point -- 7.H. Place the Emphasis at the End -- 7.I. Construct Parallel Forms for Emphasis -- 7.J. Form the Possessive Correctly -- 7.K. Break the Rules If You Must -- 8. CHOOSE PRECISE WORDS -- 8.A. Be Concise -- 8.B. Write in Language That Your Audience Can Understand -- 8.C. Avoid Pretentious Language -- 8.D. Avoid Colloquial Language -- 8.E. Be Sensitive to the Politics of Diction -- 8.F. Be Sensitive to Gender-Specific Language -- 8.G. Avoid Euphemisms -- 8.H. Choose Figurative Language Carefully -- 8.I. Use Metaphors and Similes Judiciously -- 8.J. Use Color, but Avoid Cliches -- 8.K. Use Foreign Words That Are Familiar to Your Audience -- 8.L. Check for These Common Diction Problems -- 9. REVISING AND EDITING -- 9.A. Get Some Perspective on Your Draft -- 9.B. Work with a Peer Editor -- 9.C. Revise Your Draft -- 9.D. Evaluate Your Own Arguments and Narratives -- 9.E. Evaluate Your Sentences and Word Choices -- 9.F. Proofread the Final Draft -- 9.G. Keep the Rules in Mind, but Enjoy Your Writing -- Flowchart Chapter 9: Writing Your Final Draft -- Notes -- Answers for Exercise: How to Cite -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190238940 20160618
Bringing together practical methods from both history and composition, Writing History: A Guide for Students, Fifth Edition, provides a wealth of tips and advice to help students research and write essays for history classes. Now with a lay-flat binding that further increases the book's utility, Writing History covers all aspects of writing about history, including finding and researching topics, interpreting source materials, drawing inferences from sources, and constructing arguments. It concludes with three chapters that discuss writing effective sentences, using precise wording, and revising. Using numerous examples from the works of cultural, political, and social historians, Writing History serves as an ideal text for any history course that asks students to conduct research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190238940 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-209S-01
Book
xix, 329 p. : ill ; 21 cm.
The Information-Literate Historian is the only book specifically designed to teach today's history students how to successfully select and use sources-primary, secondary, and electronic-to carry out and present their research. Expanded and updated, the second edition of TheInformation-Literate Historian continues to be an indispensable reference for historians, students, and other readers doing history research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199926046 20160608
Green Library
HISTORY-209S-01
Book
ix, 155 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
  • Preface.Chapter One: Framing the Middle Ages.Chapter Two: Tracing the Middle Ages.Chapter Three: Reading the Middle Ages.Chapter Four: Debating the Middle Ages.Chapter Five: Making and Remaking the Middle Ages.Further Reading.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745639338 20160528
What is it that medieval historians do? And how and why do they do it? "What is Medieval History?" provides an accessible, far-ranging and passionate guide to the study of medieval history. The book discusses the creation of the academic field, the nature of the sources, the intellectual tools used by medievalists, and some key areas of thematic importance from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Reformation. Students, teachers, researchers and interested general readers will find the book an invaluable guide.The author explores his field through numerous fascinating case studies, including a magical plot against a medieval pope, a fourteenth-century insurrection, and the importance of a kiss exchanged between two tenth-century noblemen. Throughout the book, readers are shown not only what medieval history is, but the cultural and political contexts in which medieval history has been written. And, above all, "What is Medieval History?" demonstrates why the pursuit of medieval history continues to be important to the present and future world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745639338 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-209S-01
Book
viii, 158 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-209S-01
Book
251 p. ; 24 cm.
An introduction to the sources, methods, and theories most often used by historians of the western middle ages, this book explores the origins of the idea of the 'middle ages' and its development in Renaissance and modern European historical discourse, the problem of periodisation and the principal themes of modern historiography. The soures of medieval history are described in detail, with chapters on history-writing in the middle ages, administrative and legal documents, coinage and the evidence of archaeology. Professor Delogu examines the materials of medieval history and the historical circumstances of their production and use, with accounts of the methods of analysis and interpretation employed by medievalists. Throughout, the reader is provided with extensive and up-to-date bibliographies for the key areas of medieval studies. The aim of the book is to enable students of medieval history to approach the written and material cultures of the period directly.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780715630792 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-209S-01
Book
xviii, 105 p. ; 18 cm.
  • FOREWORD. INTRODUCTION. I.ELEMENTARY RULES OF USAGE. 1.Form the Possessive Singular of Nouns by Adding 's. 2.In a Series of Three or More Terms with a Single Conjunction, Use a Comma after Each Term except the Last. 3.Enclose Parenthetic Expressions between Commas. 4.Place a Comma before a Conjunction Introducing an Independent Clause. 5.Do Not Join Independent Clauses with a Comma. 6.Do Not Break Sentences in Two. 7.Use a Colon after an Independent Clause to Introduce a List of Particulars, an Appositive, an Amplification, or an Illustrative Question. 8.Use a Dash to Set Off an Abrupt Break or Interruption and to Announce a Long Appositive or Summary. 9.The Number of the Subject Determines the Number of the Verb. 10.Use the Proper Case of Pronoun. 11.A Participial Phrase at the Beginning of the Sentence Must Refer to the Grammatical Subject. II.ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES OF COMPOSITION. 12.Choose a Suitable Sesign and Hold to It. 13.Make the Paragraph the unit of Composition. 14.Use the Active Voice. 15.Put Statements in Positive Form. 16.Use Definite, Specific, Concrete Language. 17.Omit Needless Words. 18.Avoid a Succession of Loose Sentences. 19.Express Coordinate Ideas in Similar Form. 20.Keep Related Words Together. 21.In Summaries, Keep to One Tense. 22.Place the Emphatic Words of a Sentence at the End. III.A FEW MATTERS OF FORM. IV.WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS COMMONLY MISUSED. V.AN APPROACH TO STYLE (WITH A LIST OF REMINDERS). 1.Place Yourself in the Background. 2.Write in a Way That Comes Naturally. 3.Work From a Suitable Style. 4.Write with Nouns and Verbs. 5.Revise and Rewrite. 6.Do Not Overwrite. 7.Do Not Overstate. 8.Avoid the Use of Qualifiers. 9.Do Not Affect a Breezy Manner. 10.Use Orthodox Spelling. 11.Do Not Explain Too Much. 12.Do Not Construct Awkward Adverbs. 13.Make Sure the Reader Knows Who is Speaking. 14.Avoid Fancy Words. 15.Do Not Use Dialect Unless Your Ear Is Good. 16.Be Clear. 17.Do Not Inject Opinion. 18.Use Figures of Speech Sparingly. 19.Do Not Take Shortcuts at the Cost of Clarity. 20.Avoid Foreign Languages. 21.Prefer the Standard to the Offbeat. Afterword. Glossary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205309023 20160528
You know the authors' names. You recognize the title. You've probably used this book yourself. This is The Elements of Style, the classic style manual, now in a fourth edition. A new Foreword by Roger Angell reminds readers that the advice of Strunk & White is as valuable today as when it was first offered.This book's unique tone, wit and charm have conveyed the principles of English style to millions of readers. Use the fourth edition of "the little book" to make a big impact with writing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205309023 20160528
You know the authors' names. You recognize the title. You've probably used this book yourself. This is The Elements of Style, the classic style manual, now in a fourth edition. The revisions to the new edition are purposely kept minimal in order to retain the book's unique tone, wit, and charm. A new Glossary of the grammatical terms used in the book provides a convenient reference for readers. The discussion of pronoun use is revised to reflect the contemporary concern with sexist language. In addition, there are numerous slight revisions in the book itself which implement this advice. A new Foreword by Roger Angell reminds readers that the advice of Strunk & White is as valuable today as when it was first offered.This book has conveyed the principles of English style to millions of readers. Use the fourth edition of "the little book" to make a big impact with writing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205313426 20160528
Green Library, Marine Biology Library (Miller), Philosophy Library (Tanner), Science Library (Li and Ma)
CEE-271A-01, HISTORY-209S-01