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Book
xvi, 279 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • List of Illustrations List of Tables Acknowledgments A Note on Translation, Transliteration, and Abbreviations Introduction. Townspeople, Company People, and Textiles: A Woven History Part One. Gendered Experiences Chapter 1. Competing Masculinities: Docile Workers, Aggressive Afandiyya, and the Mechanization of the Modern Subject Chapter 2. Urbanizing Masculinity: Workers, Weavers, and Futuwwat in Violent Alliances and Fluid Identities Chapter 3. Mechanizing Women: Industrial Workers or Women Adrift? Chapter 4. Ladies in Urban Times: Work, Property, and Gender in the Modernity of the Poor Part Two. Industrial Sexuality Chapter 5. Sexually Speaking: Unveiling the Harassment of Women, Child Molestation, Homosexuality, and Hetero-intimacy in Industrial-Urban Space Chapter 6. Striking and Sex-Working: Living with Tuberculosis, Syphilis, and Other Monsters Conclusion. The Anxiety of Transition Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477310724 20161219
Millions of Egyptian men, women, and children first experienced industrial work, urban life, and the transition from peasant-based and handcraft cultures to factory organization and hierarchy in the years between the two world wars. Their struggles to live in new places, inhabit new customs, and establish and abide by new urban norms and moral and gender orders underlie the story of the making of modern urban life-a story that has not been previously told from the perspective of Egypt's working class. Reconstructing the ordinary urban experiences of workers in al-Mahalla al-Kubra, home of the largest and most successful Egyptian textile factory, Industrial Sexuality investigates how the industrial urbanization of Egypt transformed masculine and feminine identities, sexualities, and public morality. Basing her account on archival sources that no researcher has previously used, Hanan Hammad describes how coercive industrial organization and hierarchy concentrated thousands of men, women, and children at work and at home under the authority of unfamiliar men, thus intensifying sexual harassment, child molestation, prostitution, and public exposure of private heterosexual and homosexual relationships. By juxtaposing these social experiences of daily life with national modernist discourses, Hammad demonstrates that ordinary industrial workers, handloom weavers, street vendors, lower-class landladies, and prostitutes-no less than the middle and upper classes-played a key role in shaping the Egyptian experience of modernity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477310724 20161219
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
xxii, 615 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
This book is the Winner Of The 2015 Bancroft Prize For History. For about 900 years, from 1000 to 1900, cotton was the world's most important manufacturing industry. It remains a vast business - if all the cotton bales produced in 2013 had been stacked on top of each other they would have made a somewhat unstable tower 40,000 miles high. Sven Beckert's superb new book is a history of the overwhelming role played by cotton in dictating the shape of our world. For centuries it was central to India's prosperity - a prosperity that was devastated by Britain's imperial takeover of the industry. It formed the core of Britain and Europe's industrial revolution. It revived and modernized slavery in the American South. Essential to billions of people and easily transported, cotton made fortunes, changed geographies and was crucial to modern capitalism and globalization. Empire of Cotton is both a gripping narrative and a brilliant case history of how the world works.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780241011713 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
248 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
526 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface: Boom : The Mississippi Valley in the Time of Cotton
  • Jeffersonian Visions and Nightmares in Louisiana
  • The Panic of 1835
  • The Steamboat Sublime
  • Limits to Capital
  • Race, Anxiety, and Escape on the Antebellum Mississippi
  • Dominion
  • "The Empire of the White Man's Will"
  • The Carceral Landscape
  • The Mississippi Valley in the Time of Cotton
  • Capital, Cotton, and Free Trade
  • Tales of Mississippian Empire
  • The Material Limits of "Manifest Destiny"
  • The Grey-eyed Man of Destiny
  • The Ignominious Effort to Re-Open the Atlantic Slave Trade.
When Jefferson acquired the Louisiana Territory, he envisioned an "empire for liberty" populated by self-sufficient white farmers. Cleared of Native Americans and the remnants of European empires by Andrew Jackson, the Mississippi Valley was transformed instead into a booming capitalist economy commanded by wealthy planters, powered by steam engines, and dependent on the coerced labor of slaves. River of Dark Dreams places the Cotton Kingdom at the center of worldwide webs of exchange and exploitation that extended across oceans and drove an insatiable hunger for new lands. This bold reaccounting dramatically alters our understanding of American slavery and its role in U.S. expansionism, global capitalism, and the upcoming Civil War. Walter Johnson deftly traces the connections between the planters' pro-slavery ideology, Atlantic commodity markets, and Southern schemes for global ascendency. Using slave narratives, popular literature, legal records, and personal correspondence, he recreates the harrowing details of daily life under cotton's dark dominion. We meet the confidence men and gamblers who made the Valley shimmer with promise, the slave dealers, steamboat captains, and merchants who supplied the markets, the planters who wrung their civilization out of the minds and bodies of their human property, and the true believers who threatened the Union by trying to expand the Cotton Kingdom on a global scale. But at the center of the story Johnson tells are the enslaved people who pulled down the forests, planted the fields, picked the cotton--who labored, suffered, and resisted on the dark underside of the American dream.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674045552 20160615
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
viii, 258 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Approaching Class Formation in the Gulf Arab States The Political Economy of Post-War Capitalism and the Making of the Gulf The Development of Capitalism in the Gulf Cooperation Council Towards a Single Global Economy: 1991 to 2008 The Formation of Khaleeji Capital Khaleeji Capital and the Middle East Future Trajectories Appendix A: Khaleeji Capital Groups Appendix B: Ownership of the Largest GCC Banks.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230110779 20160605
The six Arab states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) play an increasingly prominent role in the global economy and throughout the broader Middle East region. This book analyzes the recent development of Gulf capitalism through to the aftermath of the 2008 economic crisis. Situating the Gulf within the evolution of capitalism at a global scale, it presents a novel theoretical interpretation of this important region of the Middle East political economy. Accompanied by an extensive empirical analysis of all sectors of the GCC economy, the book argues that a new capitalist class, Khaleeji Capital, is forming in the Gulf - with profound implications for the Middle East as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230110779 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
x, 698 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Maps-- Prologue: Making Global History in the Spanish Empire-- A Note on Terminology Introduction: A New World: The Bajio, Spanish North America, and Global Capitalism Part I: Making a New World: The Bajio and Spanish North America, 1500-1770 1: Founding the Bajio: Otomi Expansion, Chichimeca War, and Commercial Queretaro, 1500-1660-- 2: Forging Spanish North America: Northward Expansion, Mining Amalgamations-- 3: New World Revivals: Silver Boom, City Lives, Awakenings, and Northward Drives, 1680-1760-- 4: Reforms, Riots, and Repressions: The Bajio in the Crisis of the 1760s Part II: Forging Atlantic Capitalism: The Bajio, 1770-1810 5: Capitalist, Priest, and Patriarch: Don Jose Sanchez Espinosa and the Great Family Enterprises of Mexico City, 1780-1810-- 6: Production, Patriarchy, and Polarization in the Cities: Guanajuato, San Miguel-- 7: The Challenge of Capitalism in Rural Communities: Production, Ethnicity, and Patriarchy from La Griega to Puerto de Nieto, 1780-1810-- 8: Enlightened Reformers and Popular Religion: Polarizations and Mediations, 1770-1810 Conclusion: The Bajio and North America in the Atlantic Crucible Epilogue: Toward Unimagined Revolution Acknowledgments-- Appendix A: Employers and Workers at Queretaro, 1588-1609-- Appendix B: Production, Patriarchy, and Ethnicity in the Bajio Bottomlands, 1670-1685-- Appendix C: Bajio Population, 1600-1800-- Appendix D: Eighteenth-Century Economic Indicators: Mining and Taxed Commerce-- Appendix E: The Sierra Gorda and New Santander, 1740-1760-- Appendix F: Population, Ethnicity, Family, and Work in Rural Communities, 1791-1792-- Appendix G: Tribute and Tributaries in the Queretaro District, 1807-- Notes-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822349891 20160605
Making a New World is a major rethinking of the role of the Americas in early world trade, the rise of capitalism, and the conflicts that reconfigured global power around 1800. At its centre is the Bajio, a fertile basin extending across the modern-day Mexican states of Guanajuato and Queretaro, northwest of Mexico City. The Bajio became part of a new world in the 1530s, when Mesoamerican Otomis and Franciscan friars built Queretaro, a town that quickly thrived on agriculture and trade. Settlement accelerated as regional silver mines began to flourish in the 1550s. Silver tied the Bajio to Europe and China; it stimulated the development of an unprecedented commercial, patriarchal, Catholic society. A frontier extended north across vast expanses settled by people of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry. As mining, cloth making, and irrigated cultivation increased, inequities deepened and religious debates escalated. Analyzing the political economy, social relations, and cultural conflicts that animated the Bajio and Spanish North America from 1500 to 1800, John Tutino depicts an engine of global capitalism and the tensions that would lead to its collapse into revolution in 1810.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822349891 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
xiv, 365 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- Part I. Setting the Stage: Europe and Asia before Divergence: 2. India and the global economy, 1600-1800-- 3. Political institutions and economic life-- Part II. The Divergence of Britain: 4. The European response to Indian cottons-- 5. State and market: Britain, France, and the Ottoman Empire-- 6. From cotton to coal-- Part III. The Indian Path: 7. Science and technology in India, 1600-1800-- 8. Industry in early nineteenth-century India-- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107000308 20160606
Why Europe Grew Rich and Asia Did Not provides a striking new answer to the classic question of why Europe industrialised from the late eighteenth century and Asia did not. Drawing significantly from the case of India, Prasannan Parthasarathi shows that in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the advanced regions of Europe and Asia were more alike than different, both characterized by sophisticated and growing economies. Their subsequent divergence can be attributed to different competitive and ecological pressures that in turn produced varied state policies and economic outcomes. This account breaks with conventional views, which hold that divergence occurred because Europe possessed superior markets, rationality, science or institutions. It offers instead a groundbreaking rereading of global economic development that ranges from India, Japan and China to Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire and from the textile and coal industries to the roles of science, technology and the state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107000308 20160606
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
xi, 346 p. ; 25 cm.
  • The proper swindle : commercial and financial legislation of the 1880s
  • Capitalism's idolatry : the law of charitable trusts, Mortmain, and the firm as family, c. 1870-1920
  • For general public utility : sovereignty, philanthropy, and market governance, 1890-1920
  • Hedging bets : speculation, gambling, and market ethics, 1890-1930
  • Economic agents, cultural subjects : gender, the joint family, and the making of capitalist subjects, 1900-1940
  • Conclusion: Colonial modernity and the social worlds of capital.
In "Stages of Capital", Ritu Birla brings research on non-western capitalisms into conversation with postcolonial studies to illuminate the historical roots of India's market society. Between 1870 and 1930, the British regime in India implemented a barrage of commercial and contract laws directed at the 'free' circulation of capital, including measures regulating companies, income tax, charitable gifting, and pension funds, and procedures distinguishing gambling from speculation and futures trading. Birla argues that this understudied legal infrastructure institutionalized a new object of sovereign management, the market, and along with it, a colonial concept of the public. In jurisprudence, case law, and statutes, colonial market governance enforced an abstract vision of modern society as a public of exchanging, contracting actors free from the anachronistic constraints of indigenous culture. Birla reveals how the categories of public and private infiltrated colonial commercial law, establishing distinct worlds for economic as opposed to cultural practice. This bifurcation was especially apparent in legal dilemmas concerning indigenous or 'vernacular' capitalists, crucial engines of credit and production that operated through networks of extended kinship. Focusing on the story of the Marwaris, a powerful business group renowned as a key sector of India's capitalist class, Birla demonstrates how colonial law governed vernacular capitalists as rarefied cultural actors, so rendering them illegitimate as economic agents. Birla's innovative attention to the negotiations between vernacular and colonial systems of valuation illustrates how kinship-based commercial groups asserted their legitimacy by challenging and inhabiting the public/private mapping. Highlighting the cultural politics of market governance, "Stages of Capital" is an unprecedented history of colonial commercial law, its legal fictions, and the formation of the modern economic subject in India.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822342687 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
x, 275 p. ; 23 cm.
In this book, Kalyan Sanyal reviews the traditional notion of capitalism and propounds an original theory of capitalist development in the post-colonial context. In order to substantiate his theory, concepts such as primitive accumulation, governmentality and post-colonial capitalist formation are discussed in detail. Analyzing critical questions from a third world perspective such as: Will the integration into the global capitalist network bring to the third world new economic opportunities? Will this capitalist network make the third world countries an easy prey for predatory multinational corporations? The end result is a discourse, drawing on Marx and Foucault, which envisages the post-colonial capitalist formation, albeit in an entirely different light, in the era of globalization.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415440875 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
vii, 138 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
xix, 245 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
xii, 191 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
274 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
"Shows how the intelligent analysis of the history of a single commodity can be used to pry open the history of an entire world of social relationships and human behavior.""The New York Review of Books."".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140092332 20160619
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
489 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
xvii, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01
Book
313 p. 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-208K-01