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Book
xiii, 470 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Diasporic families and the making of a business partnership
  • Livorno and the western Sephardic diaspora
  • A new city, a new society? Livorno, the Jewish nation, and communitarian cosmopolitanism
  • Between state commercial power and trading diasporas : Sephardim in the Mediterranean
  • Marriage, dowry, inheritance, and types of commercial association
  • Commission agency, economic information, and the legal and social foundations of business cooperation
  • Cross-cultural trade and the etiquette of merchants' letters
  • Ergas and Silvera's heterogeneous trading networks
  • The exchange of Mediterranean Coral and Indian diamonds
  • The "big diamond affair" : merchants on trial.
Taking a new approach to the study of cross-cultural trade, this book blends archival research with historical narrative and economic analysis to understand how the Sephardic Jews of Livorno, Tuscany, traded in regions near and far in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Francesca Trivellato tests assumptions about ethnic and religious trading diasporas and networks of exchange and trust. Her extensive research in international archives - including a vast cache of merchants' letters written between 1704 and 1746 - reveals a more nuanced view of the business relations between Jews and non-Jews across the Mediterranean, Atlantic Europe, and the Indian Ocean than ever before.The book argues that cross-cultural trade was predicated on, and generated familiarity among strangers, but could coexist easily with religious prejudice. It analyzes instances in which business cooperation among coreligionists and between strangers relied on language, customary norms, and social networks more than the progressive rise of state and legal institutions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300136838 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-203-01, HISTORY-303-01
Book
xx, 513 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- 1. Introduction-- 2. The proto-industrialization debate-- 3. Social institutions in early modern Wurttemberg-- 4. The Black Forest worsted industry-- 5. The finances of the proto-industrial guild-- 6. Labour supply and entry restrictions-- 7. Production volume and output controls-- 8. Population growth and the family-- 9. Corporate groups and economic development-- 10. Corporatism and conflict-- 11. Proto-industry and social institutions in Europe-- 12. Conclusion-- Bibliography, Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521372091 20160528
State Corporatism and Proto-Industry focuses on an industrial countryside in south-west Germany, where a dense worsted industry dominated the rural economy from 1580 to 1800. This is an example of 'proto-industry', the dense, export-oriented rural manufacturing which arose throughout Europe before factory industrialization. But although the Wurttemberg worsted industry possessed all the features of a classic proto-industry, closer scrutiny throws doubt on basic assumptions about European proto-industrialization. In this book, Sheilagh Ogilvie shows that proto-industries did not break down traditional society. Instead, corporate institutions such as guilds, merchant companies, village communities and manorial systems retained enormous power. This was a result of 'state corporatism': the expanding early modern state granted privileges to favoured groups in return for fiscal and regulatory co-operation. As Ogilvie shows, these corporate privileges profoundly constrained both individual decisions and economic development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521372091 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-203-01, HISTORY-303-01
Book
xiv, 361 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Philip Hoffman shatters the widespread myth that traditional agricultural societies in early modern Europe were socially and economically stagnant and ultimately dependent on wide-scale political revolution for their growth. Through a richly detailed historical investigation of the peasant agriculture of "ancien-regime" France, the author uncovers evidence that requires a new understanding of what constituted economic growth in such societies. His arguments rest on a measurement of long-term growth that enables him to analyse the economic, institutional, and political factors that explain its forms and rhythms. In comparing France with England and Germany, Hoffman arrives at fresh answers to some classic questions: Did French agriculture lag behind farming in other countries? If so, did the obstacles in French agriculture lurk within peasant society itself, in the peasants' culture, in their communal property rights, or in the small scale of their farms? Or did the obstacles hide elsewhere, in politics, in the tax system, or in meager opportunites for trade? The author discovers that growth cannot be explained by culture, property rights, or farm size, and argues that the real causes of growth derived from politics and gains from trade. By challenging other widely held beliefs, such as the nature of the commons and the workings of the rural economy, Hoffman offers a new analysis of peasant society and culture, one based on microeconomics and game theory and intended for a wide range of social scientists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691029832 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-203-01, HISTORY-303-01
Book
xiii, 698 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
HISTORY-203-01, HISTORY-303-01
Book
x, 334 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-203-01, HISTORY-303-01