Book
xiv, 296 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface 1. Until Barbarossa 2. Towards Genocide 3. Genocide 4. Germany's Allies 5. Memorialization 6. The Holocaust and Today 7. Conclusions Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253022141 20161003
Brilliant and wrenching, The Holocaust: History and Memory tells the story of the brutal mass slaughter of Jews during World War II and how that genocide has been remembered and misremembered ever since. Taking issue with generations of scholars who separate the Holocaust from Germany's military ambitions, historian Jeremy M. Black demonstrates persuasively that Germany's war on the Allies was entwined with Hitler's war on Jews. As more and more territory came under Hitler's control, the extermination of Jews became a major war aim, particularly in the east, where many died and whole Jewish communities were exterminated in mass shootings carried out by the German army and collaborators long before the extermination camps were built. Rommel's attack on Egypt was a stepping stone to a larger goal-the annihilation of 400,000 Jews living in Palestine. After Pearl Harbor, Hitler saw America's initial focus on war with Germany rather than Japan as evidence of influential Jewish interests in American policy, thus justifying and escalating his war with Jewry through the Final Solution. And the German public knew. In chilling detail, Black unveils compelling evidence that many everyday Germans must have been aware of the genocide around them. In the final chapter, he incisively explains the various ways that the Holocaust has been remembered, downplayed, and even dismissed as it slips from horrific experience into collective consciousness and memory. Essential, concise, and highly readable, The Holocaust: History and Memory bears witness to those forever silenced and ensures that we will never forget their horrifying fate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253022141 20161003
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xix, 361 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Holocaust, War, and Genocide: Themes and Problems Chapter 1 Dry Timber: Preconditions Chapter 2 Leadership and Will: Hitler, the National Socialist German Workers' Party, and Nazi Ideology Chapter 3 From Revolution to Routine: Nazi Germany, 1933-1938 Chapter 4 Open Aggression: In Search of War, 1938-1939 Chapter 5 Brutal Innovations: War against Poland and the So-Called Euthanasia Program, 1939-1940 Chapter 6 Expansion and Systematization: Exporting War and Terror, 1940-1941 Chapter 7 War and Genocide: Decisions and Dynamics in the Peak Years of Killing, 1942-1943 Chapter 8 Flashover: The Killing Centers, 1942-1944 Chapter 9 Death Throes and Killing Frenzies, 1944-1945 Conclusion: Legacies of Atrocity Acknowledgments Sources and Suggestions for Further Reading List of Maps List of Illustrations Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442242289 20160704
In examining one of the defining events of the twentieth century, Doris L. Bergen situates the Holocaust in its historical, political, social, cultural, and military contexts. Unlike many other treatments of the Holocaust, this revised, third edition discusses not only the persecution of the Jews, but also other segments of society victimized by the Nazis: Roma, homosexuals, Poles, Soviet POWs, the disabled, and other groups deemed undesirable. In clear and eloquent prose, Bergen explores the two interconnected goals that drove the Nazi German program of conquest and genocide-purification of the so-called Aryan race and expansion of its living space-and discusses how these goals affected the course of World War II. Including firsthand accounts from perpetrators, victims, and eyewitnesses, her book is immediate, human, and eminently readable.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442242289 20160704
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
207 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Video
6 videodiscs (566 min.) : sd., col., b&w ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 booklet (60 p. : col. ill. ; 19 cm.)
  • Disc 1. First era, part one
  • Disc 2. First era, part two
  • Disc 3. Second era, part one
  • Disc 4. Second era, part two
  • Disc 5. Supplements
  • Disc 6. Supplements.
Over a decade in the making, this monumental investigation of the unthinkable: the murder of more than six million Jews by the Nazis. Using no archival footage, Claude Lanzmann instead focuses on first-person testimonies (of survivors and former Nazis, and other witnesses), employing a circular, free-associative method in assembling them. The intellectual yet emotionally overwhelming SHOAH is not a film about excavating the past but an intensive portrait in which the past is always present.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
x, 310 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Introduction-- 1. Popular Culture and the Politics of Memory-- 2. The Rhetoric of Victimization-- 3. The Americanization of the Holocaust-- 4. Anne Frank: The Posthumous Years-- 5. The Anne Frank We Remember/The Anne Frank We Forget-- 6. Jean Amery: The Anguish of the Witness-- 7. Primo Levi: The Survivor as Victim-- 8. Surviving Survival: Elie Wiesel and Imre Kertesz-- 9. The End of the Holocaust Epilogue: A "Second Holocaust"? Notes-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253356437 20160603
In this provocative work, Alvin H. Rosenfeld contends that the proliferation of books, films, television programs, museums, and public commemorations related to the Holocaust has, perversely, brought about a diminution of its meaning and a denigration of its memory. Investigating a wide range of events and cultural phenomena, such as Ronald Reagan's 1985 visit to the German cemetery at Bitburg, the distortions of Anne Frank's story, and the ways in which the Holocaust has been depicted by such artists and filmmakers as Judy Chicago and Steven Spielberg, Rosenfeld charts the cultural forces that have minimized the Holocaust in popular perceptions. He contrasts these with sobering representations by Holocaust witnesses such as Jean Amery, Primo Levi, Elie Wiesel, and Imre Kertesz. The book concludes with a powerful warning about the possible consequences of "the end of the Holocaust" in public consciousness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253356437 20160603
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Video
1 videodisc (90 min.) : sd., col. and b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
  • Lost history
  • Jewish Council
  • "I might see my mother"
  • Flowers, furniture, teapot
  • Auerswald's reports
  • Willy Wist, cameraman
  • Garbage and lipstick
  • Waiting to die
  • Smuggling
  • Underground Jewish archive
  • Surprising discovery
  • Dinner and theater
  • "A Jew film"
  • Death
  • Ghetto in color
  • "Today I can cry"
  • Faces.
  • Features: Death Mills (1945, 22 min.; directed by Billy Wilder; new telecine made from archival 16mm elements) ; Interview with author and film researcher Adrian Wood (ca. 15 min.) ; Scholar Michael Berenbaum on A Film Unfinished (ca. 4 min.) ; Study Guide in pdf format [DVD-ROM feature].
At the end of WWII, 60 minutes of raw film in an East German archive was discovered. Shot by the Nazis in Warsaw in May of 1942, the film became a resource for historians seeking an authentic record of the Warsaw Ghetto. The later discovery of a long-missing reel, including multiple takes and cameramen staging scenes, complicated earlier readings of the footage. Presented is the raw footage in its entirety, falsely showing the 'good life' of Jewish urbanites. Included is an interview, and more.
Death Mills: "Directed by...Billy Wilder for the U.S. War Department in 1945, [this film] was originally intended for screening in occupied Germany and Austria and featured a German language soundtrack...[T]he first documentary to show what the Allies found when they liberated the Nazi extermination camps: the survivors, the conditions, and the evidence of mass murder." -- Onscreen menu.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xi, 410 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
  • Preface-- Glossary and Abbreviations-- Introduction-- PART I: A EUROPEAN HISTORY OF VIOLENCE-- 1. Europe on the Brink-- 2. The First World War Era-- 3. Ethnopolitics, Geopolitics, and the Return to War-- PART II: NAZISM AND THE FINAL SOLUTION-- 4. Nazism and Germany-- 5. Genocide in Germany's Eastern Empire-- 6. The Patterns and Limits of the European Genocide-- PART III: PERPETRATORS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT-- 7. Why did they kill?-- PART IV: CIVILIZATION AND THE HOLOCAUST-- 8. Locating Genocide in the Human Past-- Bibliography of Sources Cited-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199550340 20160528
The Holocaust is frequently depicted in isolation by its historians. Some of them believe that to place it in any kind of comparative context risks diminishing its uniqueness and even detracts from the enormity of the Nazi crime. In reality, such a restricted understanding of 'uniqueness' has pulled the Holocaust apart from history and set up barriers to a better understanding of the racial onslaught unleashed within the Third Reich and its conquered territories. Working against the grain of much earlier writing, this innovative new history combines a detailed re-appraisal of the development of the genocide of the Jews, a full consideration of Nazi policies against other population groups, and a comparative analysis of other modern genocides. The Holocaust is portrayed as the culmination of a much wider history of European genocide and ethnic cleansing, from the late nineteenth century onwards. Ultimately, Bloxham shows that an explanation for the Holocaust rooted exclusively in Nazism and antisemitism is inadequate when set against one that is both prepared to give due weight to the immediate circumstances of the Second World War in eastern Europe and to situate the Jewish genocide within the broader patterns of human behaviour in the late-modern world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199550340 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
232 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Of one-and-a-half-million surviving photographs related to Nazi concentration camps, only four depict the actual process of mass killing perpetrated at the gas chambers. "Images in Spite of All" reveals that these rare photos of Auschwitz, taken clandestinely by one of the Jewish prisoners forced to help carry out the atrocities there, were made as a potent act of resistance.Available today because they were smuggled out of the camp and into the hands of Polish resistance fighters, the photographs show a group of naked women being herded into the gas chambers, and the cremation of corpses that have just been pulled out. Georges Didi-Huberman's relentless consideration of these harrowing scenes demonstrates how Holocaust testimony can shift from texts and imaginations to irrefutable images that attempt to speak the unspeakable. Including a powerful response to those who have criticized his interest in these images as voyeuristic, Didi-Huberman's eloquent reflections constitute an invaluable contribution to debates over the representability of the Holocaust and the status of archival photographs in an image-saturated world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226148168 20160528
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HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xxvi, 870 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
234 p. ; 22 cm.
In "The Holocaust and Memory in the Global Age", Daniel Levy and Natan Sznaider examine the distinctive forms that collective memory take in the age of globalisation. Levy and Sznaider examine the way the Holocaust has been remembered in Germany, Israel, and the US during the last fifty years, and show how this singular event has been detached from its precise context and instead used as a way of focusing abstract questions of good and evil, and how this use has given the Holocaust a resonance across the global stage, as responses to other injustices like ethnic cleansing in Bosnia have depended on a collective understanding of the Holocaust to justify such actions. In so doing, memories of this singularly tragic event as articulated in our global age open up new possibilities for imagining global political and cultural norms for the effective spread of human rights and for corrected injustices around the globe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781592132768 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xv, 878 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Tony Judt's Postwar makes one lament the overuse of the word "groundbreaking." It is an unprecedented accomplishment: the first truly European history of contemporary Europe, from Lisbon to Leningrad, based on research in six languages, covering thirty-four countries across sixty years in a single integrated narrative, using a great deal of material from newly available sources. Tony Judt has drawn on forty years of reading and writing about modern Europe to create a fully rounded, deep account of the continent's recent past. The book integrates international relations, domestic politics, ideas, social change, economic development, and culture--high and low--into a single grand narrative. Every country has its chance to play the lead, and although the big themes are superbly handled--including the cold war, the love/hate relationship with America, cultural and economic malaise and rebirth, and the myth and reality of unification--none of them is allowed to overshadow the rich pageant that is the whole. Vividly and clearly written for the general reader; witty, opinionated, and full of fresh and surprising stories and asides; visually rich and rewarding, with useful and provocative maps, photos, and cartoons throughout, "Postwar" is a movable feast for lovers of history and lovers of Europe alike. A magnificent history of postwar Europe, East and West, by arguably the subject's most esteemed historian.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594200656 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Video
1 videodisc (31 min.) : sd., b&w and col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Filmed in 1955 at Auschwitz, combines color footage with black and white newsreels and stills to tell the story of not just the Holocaust, but the horror of man's brutal inhumanity.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01
Video
4 videodiscs (566 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
  • Disc. one 1st era, 1st part
  • Disc 2. 1st era, 2nd part
  • Disc three. 2nd era, 1st part
  • Disc four. 2nd era, 2nd part.
The Nazi extermination of Jews is examined through interviews of survivors, witnesses and perpetrators and through footage of the sites of the death camps and environs as they appear today. Those interviewed include Jewish survivors of the death camps and the Warsaw ghetto uprising, Polish farmers and villagers who lived near the camps and Nazis who worked in the camps and the ghettos.
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HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Video
1 videodisc (120 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
This film, commissioned by Adolf Hitler to record the 1934 Nazi party rally in Nuremberg, is the "most powerful piece of propaganda ever produced". Included are many scenes of gatherings, marches, and parades. The viewer will also hear speeches given by Hitler, Goering, Goebbels, and Hess as well as samples of monumental architecture designed by Albert Speer.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xxii, 271 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
This study is an account of how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews. Browning tells about such Germans, and helps the reader to understand, not only what they did to make the Holocaust happen, but also how they were transformed psychologically, from the ordinary men of the title into active participants in the most monstrous crime in human history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780060995065 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
v. ; 25 cm.
  • v. 1. The years of persecution, 1933-1939
Green Library
HISTORY-302K-01, HISTORY-202K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
622 p.
This groundbreaking international bestseller lays to rest many myths about the Holocaust: that Germans were ignorant of the mass destruction of Jews, that the killers were all SS men, and that those who slaughtered Jews did so reluctantly. Hitler's Willing Executioners provides conclusive evidence that the extermination of European Jewry engaged the energies and enthusiasm of tens of thousands of ordinary Germans. Goldhagen reconstructs the climate of "eliminationist anti-Semitism" that made Hitler's pursuit of his genocidal goals possible and the radical persecution of the Jews during the 1930s popular. Drawing on a wealth of unused archival materials, principally the testimony of the killers themselves, Goldhagen takes us into the killing fields where Germans voluntarily hunted Jews like animals, tortured them wantonly, and then posed cheerfully for snapshots with their victims. From mobile killing units, to the camps, to the death marches, Goldhagen shows how ordinary Germans, nurtured in a society where Jews were seen as unalterable evil and dangerous, willingly followed their beliefs to their logical conclusion. "Hitler's Willing Executioner's is an original, indeed brilliant contribution to the...literature on the Holocaust."--New York Review of Books "The most important book ever published about the Holocaust...Eloquently written, meticulously documented, impassioned...A model of moral and scholarly integrity."--Philadelphia Inquirer.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780679446958 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xi, 306 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Darkness Visible by Geoffrey Hartman 1 On Testimony by Annette Wieviorka, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Paris 2 The Library of Jewish Catastrophe by David Roskies, Jewish Theological Seminary of America 3 Voices from the Killing Ground by Sara Horowitz, University of Delaware 4 Jean Amery as Witness by Alvin Rosenfeld, Indiana University 5 Remembering Survival by Lawrence Langer, Simmons College 6 Christian Witness and the Shoah by David Tracy, University of Chicago 7 Film as Witness: Lanzmann's Shoah by Shoshana Felman, Yale University 8 Charlotte Salomon's Inward-Turning Testimony by Mary Felstiner, San Francisco State University 9 `Varschreibt!' by R.B. Kitaj, artist 10 Conversation in the Cemetery: Dan Pagis and the Prosaics of Memory by Sidra Ezrahi, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 11 Chinese History and Jewish Memory by Vera Schwarcz, Wesleyan University 12 The Awakening by Aharon Applefeld, Israeli novelist 13 Facing the Glass Booth by Haim Gouri, Israeli poet, novelist and film-maker 14 The Andean Waltz by Leo Spitzer, Dartmouth College 15 German-Jewish Memory and National Consciousness by Miriam Hansen & Michael Geyer, both University of Chicago 16 Negating the Dead by Nadine Fresco, Centre National de Recherche Scientique, Paris 17 `The First Blow': Projects for the Camp at Fossoli by Giovanni Leoni, Italian architect 18 Jewish Memory in Poland by James Young, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 19 Reclaining Auschwwitz by Deborah Dwork & Robert Jan van Pelt, respectively Yale Child Study Center & University of British Columbia 20 Memory, Trauma and the Writing of History by Saul Friedlander, Tel Aviv University `Liberation' (poem) by Abraham Sutzkever, Israeli Yiddish poet.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781557861252 20160527
  • Darkness Visible: Geoffrey Hartman.1. On Testimony: Annette Wieviork (Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Paris).2. The Library of Jewish Catastrophe: David Roskies (Jewish Theological Seminary of America).3. Voices from the Killing Ground: Sara Horowitz (University of Delaware).4. Jean Amery as Witness: Alvin Rosenfeld (Indiana University).5. Remembering Survival: Lawrence Langer (Simmons College).6. Christian Witness and the Shoah: David Tracy (University of Chicago).7. Film as Witness: Lanzmann's Shoah: Shoshana Felman (Yale University).8. Charlotte Salomon's Inward-Turning Testimony: Mary Felstiner (San Francisco State University).9. 'Varschreibt!': R. B. Kitaj.10. Conversation in the Cemetery: Dan Pagis and the Prosaics of Memory: Sidra Ezrahi (Hebrew University of Jerusalem).11. Chinese History and Jewish Memory: Vera Schwarcz (Wesleyan University).12. The Awakening: Aharon Applefeld.13. Facing the Glass Booth: Haim Gouri.14. The Andean Waltz: Leo Spitzer (Dartmouth College).15. German-Jewish Memory and National Consciousness: Miriam Hansen &amp-- Michael Geyer (both University of Chicago).16. Negating the Dead: Nadine Fresco (Centre National de Recherche Scientique, Paris).17. 'The First Blow': Projects for the Camp at Fossoli: Giovanni Leoni.18. Jewish Memory in Poland: James Young (University of Massachusetts, Amherst).19. Reclaining Auschwwitz: Deborah Dwork &amp-- Robert Jan van Pelt (Yale Child Study Center &amp-- University of British Columbia).20. Memory, Trauma and the Writing of History: Saul Friedlander (Tel Aviv University). 'Liberation' (poem): Abraham Sutzkever.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781557863676 20160528
The recording, explanation and the inescapable task of judging great wrongs in the past presents historians with their most difficult assignment. For those who have either lived through such injustice or have been in some way responsible for it the impositions of memory are both painful and unavoidable. Memory shapes the future, and the recollections of past suffering haunt and may overwhelm generations long after. In 1938 the National Socialist Party in Germany began the final preparations for the systematic genocide of the Jews throughout Europe. For the Jews, whose national loyalties had long exceeded any ties of ethnicity, the programme of extermination was an act not merely of monstrous cruelty but of humiliation and treachery. In Holocaust Remembrance scholars, artists and writers consider the ways in which the events of 1938-1945 have been, might be, and will be remembered. The records of the Holocaust are vast and various, ranging from the museum at Auschwitz to the cartoons of Art Spiegelman, from the dark paintings of R.B. Kitaj to the elegaic stories of Primo Levi, from the filmed testimonies of the death camp survivors to revisionist historians who usurp the name of scholar in the pursuit of denial and evasion. The perspectives brought to bear here are rich and various - impassioned, objective, personal, poetical, historical and philosophical. They are united by an awareness of the dangers both of respectful silence and overwhelming information, and that only in remembering can an understanding of the past be sought and human kind redeemed from the forces of humiliation and guilt.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781557861252 20160527
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HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01
Book
xvii, 398 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
  • The Texture of Memory PART I Germany: The Ambiguity Memory - The Counter-monument: Memory Against Itself in Germany Today-- The Sites of Destruction-- The Gestapo-Gelande-- Austria's Ambivalent Memory. PART 2 Poland: The Ruins of Memory - The Rhetoric of Ruins - Majdanek and Auschwitz-- The Biography of a Memorial Icon - The Warsaw Ghetto Monument-- Broken Tablets and Jewish Memory in Poland Today. PART 3 Israel: Holocaust, Heroism and National Redemption: Israel's Memorial Landscape: Forests, Monuments, Kibbutzim-- Yad Vashem - Israel's Memorial Authority-- When a Day Remembers - A Performative History of Yom Hashoah. PART 4 America: Memory and the Politics of Identity - The Plural Faces of Memory in America-- Memory and the Politics of Identity - Boston and Washington, DC.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300059915 20160528
In this study of Holocaust memorials, James E. Young explores both the idea of the monument and its role in public memory, disucssing how every nation remembers the Holocaust according to its own traditions, ideals, and experiences, and how these memorials reflect the ever-evolving meanings of the Holocaust in Europe, Israel and America. The result is a study of Holocaust memory, public art and their fusion in contemporary life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300059915 20160528
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HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01

20. Lessons and legacies [1991 - ]

Book
v. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction, Jeffry M. Diefendorf-- Part I: Rethinking Nazi Policies-- Part II: Resistance and Rescue-- Part III: German Scholars and the Holocaust-- Part IV: Historiography and the Challenges to Historians-- Part V: Trials, Compensation, and Jewish Assets-- Part VI: Confronting the Past.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810119994 20160528
  • Introduction, by Dogmur Herzog The Holocaust as Leitmotif of the Twentieth Century, by Omer Bartov-- Part I: Avarice-- Part II: Ideology-- Part III: Gender and Sexual Violence-- Part IV: Collaboration and the Eastern Front-- Part V: Dimensions of Memory-- Part VI: Documentary-- Part VII: Historiography and Pedagogy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810123700 20160528
A collection of 19 essays focusing on how various fields of study can open new perspectives on the Holocaust. Culture and politics in Germany after 1933 are examined, and the memorialization of those years, and the shocking denials of the Holocaust are addressed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810116658 20160527
Distinguished scholars explore historical context, perpetrators, the courts, and historical perspective as these relate to the complex topic of the Holocaust and justice. The Holocaust and justice: How can one link these terms, given the enormity of Nazi mass murder? Is justice possible for crimes of such magnitude? If so, what kind of justice? In the courts? Before the bar of history? Retrospective as well as contemporary? Divine? Weighing these questions and their considerable implications, a group of distinguished scholars attempt to untangle the complex and often contradictory relationship between the Holocaust and justice. What were the political, social, psychological, and ideological prerequisites for this tragedy? the contributors ask, seeking an historical context. What animated the murderers, and what agencies did they work through? Examining the courts and trials, from those during and immediately after the war to recent cases against aging perpetrators, the authors examine the legal mechanisms for trying to achieve justice, as well as the issues that complicate litigation, including the dimming effects of the passage of time. Their inquiry extends to questions about memory - how it is shaped and reshaped and whether it can be reliable - and about the recreation of the events of the Holocaust for a second generation: Does reassembling the evidence of the Holocaust through the lens of a later generation provide a deeper understanding, and does this understanding include a sense of justice accomplished? In raising and responding to these questions in a balanced, multifaceted, and informative way, this volume sharpens and deepens our understanding of a topic that has only become more perplexing and pressing with time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810119161 20160528
In the courtroom and the classroom, in popular media, public policy, and scholarly pursuits, the Holocaust - its origins, its nature, and its implications - remains very much a matter of interest, debate, and controversy. Arriving at a time when a new generation must come to terms with the legacy of the Holocaust or forever lose the benefit of its historical, social, and moral lessons, this volume offers a richly varied, deeply informed perspective on the practice, interpretation, and direction of Holocaust research now and in the future. I n their essays the authors - an international group including eminent senior scholars as well those who represent the future of the field - set the agenda for Holocaust studies in the coming years, even as they give readers the means for understanding today's news and views of the Holocaust, whether in court cases involving victims and perpetrators; international, national, and corporate developments; or fictional, documentary, and historical accounts. Several of the essays - such as one on nonarmed "amidah" or resistance and others on the role of gender in the behavior of perpetrators and victims - provide innovative and potentially significant interpretive frameworks for the field of Holocaust studies. Others, for instance, the rounding up of Jews in Italy, Nazi food policy in Eastern Europe, and Nazi anti-Jewish scholarship, emphasize the importance of new sources for reconstructing the historical record. Still others, including essays on the 1964. Frankfurt trial of Auschwitz guards and on the response of the Catholic Church to the question of German guilt, bring a new depth and sophistication to highly charged, sharply politicized topics. Together these essays will inform the future of the Holocaust in scholarly research and in popular understanding.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810119994 20160528
As the discipline of Holocaust studies matures, new questions and themes come to the fore. Among these are critical issues that receive serious scholarly attention, often for the first time, in this collection of essays by some of the world's most respected experts in the field. This title covers topics such as: greed and theft as motives for Holocaust perpetrators and bystanders; sexual violence and what it tells us about the experiences of both victims and perpetrators; collaboration with Nazis among the local populations of the ever-moving Eastern front; the durability of anti-Semitism after 1945; and the perspectives of the Soviet military and Soviet leadership on Nazi crimes: these are some of the topics the authors address as they extend the boundaries of Holocaust scholarship beyond the central loci of the planning and execution of technologized mass murder - Germany and Poland - and into ghettos and killing fields in Ukraine and Belarus, as well as spaces whose boundaries and national identities changed repeatedly. The authors also look to Western Europe and consider the expropriation of Dutch Jews and the exigencies of post-Holocaust film making in France; they draw insights from recent genocides such as those in Cambodia and Rwanda, and provide new critical analyses of the course and meaning of contested responses to the Shoah in nations and locations long and deeply studied. A thorough, thoughtful, and insightful introduction clarifies the volume's themes and concisely places them within the larger context of Holocaust scholarship; and an introductory essay by Omer Bartov brings into focus the numerous paradoxes structuring early twenty-first-century retrospective thinking about the significance of the Holocaust as a central theme of the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810123700 20160528
In authoritative, nonpolemical essays on some of the latest and most contentious issues surrounding the Holocaust, the contributors to this volume revisit some topics central to Holocaust studies, such as the stance of the papacy and the concern about the uses to which the meaning of the Holocaust has been put, while expanding research into less-examined areas such as propriety, sexuality, and proximity. Variously concerned with issues of guilt and victimization, the essays examine individuals like Pius XII and Romano Guardini and the institutions of organized religion as well as the roles of the Jewish Councils and the retributive judicial proceedings in Hungary. They reveal that victimization within the Holocaust experience is surprisingly open-ended, with Jewish women doubly victimized by their gender; postwar Germans viewing themselves as the epoch's greatest victims; Poles, whether Jewish or not, victimized beyond. others because of their proximity to the epicenter of the Holocaust; and German university students corrupted by ideological inculcation and racist propaganda. Though offering no "positive lessons" or comforting assurances, these essays add to the ongoing examination of Holocaust consequences and offer insightful analyses of facets previously minimized or neglected. Together they illustrate that matters of gender, sexuality, and proximity are crucial for shaping perceptions of a Holocaust reality that will always remain elusive.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810119901 20160528
Primo Levi opened his memoir "Survival in Auschwitz" with a call to remember, reflect upon, and teach about the Holocaust - or to face the rejection of subsequent generations. The transmittal of this urgent knowledge between generations was the theme of the Eigth Lessons and Legacies Conference on the Holocaust, and it is the focus of this volume. The circular formulation - from generation to generation - points backward and forward: where do we locate the roots of the Holocaust, and how do its repercussions manifest themselves? Contributions by scholars, some of whom are survivors and children of survivors, remind us that the Holocaust does - and must - remain present from generation to generation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810125391 20160528
Focusing on matters unique to Holocaust education, these essays address topics including: the difficult and toubling issue of explaining the perpetrators' behaviour; the scope and content of survivor literature; and the stucture of courses and the implications of being an educator in this field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810115620 20160528
The essays in the tenth volume of Lessons and Legacies offer a sense of the issues that run through current thinking about the Holocaust and ideas about the different ways we engage with a broad range of sources. New sources ranging from traditional archival finds to microhistories accessible via newer technology infuse Holocaust research. At the same time, the fields of Holocaust research and Jewish studies have an increasing impact upon other disciplines. Overall, the editor and writers find that the integration of insights, methodologies, critiques, and questions from psychology, literary studies, visual arts, and other fields with those of history, political science, and other social sciences sharpens the tools of analysis. The essays in this volume testify to the evolution of the field of Holocaust studies and also indicate a future direction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810128620 20160612
Green Library
HISTORY-202K-01, HISTORY-302K-01, JEWISHST-282K-01, JEWISHST-382K-01