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Book
xv, 692 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
The first full account of the government-sanctioned genocide of California Indians under United States rule Between 1846 and 1873, California's Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended. This deeply researched book is a comprehensive and chilling history of an American genocide. Madley describes pre-contact California and precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence against California Indians. He narrates the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Many participated: vigilantes, volunteer state militiamen, U.S. Army soldiers, U.S. congressmen, California governors, and others. The state and federal governments spent at least $1,700,000 on campaigns against California Indians. Besides evaluating government officials' culpability, Madley considers why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300181364 20161128
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
xxxi, 368 pages, 10 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS SHOEBOOTS FAMILY TREE PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION ACKNOWLEDGMENTS INTRODUCTION PART ONE BONE OF MY BONE: SLAVERY, RACE, AND NATION--EAST 1. CAPTIVITY 2. SLAVERY 3. MOTHERHOOD 4. PROPERTY 5. CHRISTIANITY 6. NATIONHOOD 7. GOLD RUSH PART TWO OF BLOOD AND BONE: FREEDOM, KINSHIP, AND CITIZENSHIP--WEST 8. REMOVAL 9. CAPTURE 10. FREEDOM EPILOGUE: CITIZENSHIP CODA: THE SHOEBOOTS FAMILY TODAY APPENDIX 1. RESEARCH METHODS AND CHALLENGES APPENDIX 2. DEFINITION AND USE OF TERMS APPENDIX 3. CHEROKEE NAMES AND MISTAKEN IDENTITIES APPENDIX 4. PRIMARY SOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY NOTES SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520285637 20160618
This beautifully written book, now in its second edition, tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom. Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots's widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century. Updated with a new preface and an appendix of key primary sources, this remains an essential book for students of Native American history, African American history, and the history of race and ethnicity in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520285637 20160618
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
1 online resource (395 pages) : illustrations, photographs
Countless African Americans have passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and communities. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile. This history of passing explores the possibilities, challenges, and losses that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674368101 20180521
eReserve
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
xxiv, 232 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations List of Tables Foreword Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Identity Crisis in Postimperial China 2. Ethnicity as Language 3. Plausible Communities 4. The Consent of the Categorized 5. Counting to Fifty-Six Conclusion: A History of the Future Appendix A: Ethnotaxonomy of Yunnan, 1951, According to the Yunnan Nationalities Affairs Commission Appendix B: Ethnotaxonomy of Yunnan, 1953, According to the Yunnan Nationalities Affairs Commission Appendix C: Minzu Entries, 1953 1954 Census, by Population Appendix D: Classification Squads, Phases One and Two Appendix E: Population Sizes of Groups Researched during Phase One and Phase Two Notes Character Glossary Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520262782 20160604
China is a vast nation comprised of hundreds of distinct ethnic communities, each with its own language, history, and culture. Today the government of China recognizes just 56 ethnic nationalities, or minzu, as groups entitled to representation. This controversial new book recounts the history of the most sweeping attempt to sort and categorize the nation's enormous population: the 1954 Ethnic Classification project (minzu shibie). Thomas S. Mullaney draws on recently declassified material and extensive oral histories to describe how the communist government, in power less than a decade, launched this process in ethnically diverse Yunnan. Mullaney shows how the government drew on Republican-era scholarship for conceptual and methodological inspiration as it developed a strategy for identifying minzu and how non-Party-member Chinese ethnologists produced a 'scientific' survey that would become the basis for a policy on nationalities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520262782 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
xviii, 442 p.
eReserve
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
viii, 500 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Reversed colonialism
  • Conquest
  • New order
  • The embrace
  • The empire of the Plains
  • Greater Comanchería
  • Children of the sun
  • Hunger
  • Collapse
  • Conclusion: The shape of power.
In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, at the high tide of imperial struggles in North America, an indigenous empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. This powerful empire, built by the Comanche Indians, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, political prestige, economic power, commercial reach, and cultural influence. Yet, until now, the Comanche empire has gone unrecognized in historical accounts.This compelling and original book uncovers the lost story of the Comanches. It is a story that challenges the idea of indigenous peoples as victims of European expansion and offers a new model for the history of colonial expansion, colonial frontiers, and Indian-Euramerican relations in North America and elsewhere. Pekka Hamalainen shows in vivid detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they fell to defeat in 1875. With extensive knowledge and deep insight, the author brings into clear relief the Comanches' remarkable impact on the trajectory of history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300126549 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
x, 275 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
How did thousands of Chinese migrants end up working alongside African Americans in Louisiana after the Civil War? Tracing American ideas of Asian labor to the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, Moon-Ho Jung argues that the racial formation of "coolies" in American culture and law played a pivotal role in reconstructing concepts of race, nation, and citizenship in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801890826 20160528
How did thousands of Chinese migrants end up working alongside African Americans in Louisiana after the Civil War? With the stories of these workers, "Coolies and Cane" advances an interpretation of emancipation that moves beyond U.S. borders and the black-white racial dynamic. Tracing American ideas of Asian labor to the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, Moon-Ho Jung argues that the racial formation of "coolies" in American culture and law played a pivotal role in reconstructing concepts of race, nation, and citizenship in the United States. Jung examines how coolies appeared in major U.S. political debates on race, labor, and immigration between the 1830s and 1880s. He finds that racial notions of coolies were articulated in many, often contradictory, ways. They marked the progress of freedom; they symbolized the barbarism of slavery. Welcomed and rejected as neither black nor white, coolies emerged recurrently as both the salvation of the fracturing and reuniting nation and the scourge of American civilization. Based on a wealth of archival research, this study makes sense of these contradictions to reveal how American impulses to recruit and exclude coolies enabled and justified a series of historical transitions: from slave-trade laws to racially coded immigration laws, from a slaveholding nation to a "nation of immigrants, " and from a continental empire of manifest destiny to a liberating empire across the seas. Combining political, cultural, and social history, "Coolies and Cane" is a compelling study of race, Reconstruction, and Asian American history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801882814 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
207 p. ; 22 cm.
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ix INTRODUCTION 1 ONE: Religion and the Invention of Racism 15 TWO: T e Rise of Modern Racism(s): White Supremacy and Antisemitism in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries 49 THREE: Climax and Retreat: Racism in the Twentieth Century 97 EPILOGUE: Racism at the Dawn of the Twenty-First Century 139 APPENDIX: THe Concept of Racism in Historical Discourse 151 NOTES 171 INDEX 193.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691116525 20160528
Are antisemitism and white supremacy manifestations of a general phenomenon? Why didn't racism appear in Europe before the fourteenth century, and why did it flourish as never before in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? Why did the twentieth century see institutionalized racism in its most extreme forms? Why are egalitarian societies particularly susceptible to virulent racism? What do apartheid South Africa, Nazi Germany, and the American South under Jim Crow have in common? How did the Holocaust advance civil rights in the United States? With a rare blend of learning, economy, and cutting insight, George Fredrickson surveys the history of Western racism from its emergence in the late Middle Ages to the present. Beginning with the medieval antisemitism that put Jews beyond the pale of humanity, he traces the spread of racist thinking in the wake of European expansionism and the beginnings of the African slave trade. And he examines how the Enlightenment and nineteenth-century romantic nationalism created a new intellectual context for debates over slavery and Jewish emancipation. Fredrickson then makes the first sustained comparison between the color-coded racism of nineteenth-century America and the antisemitic racism that appeared in Germany around the same time. He finds similarity enough to justify the common label but also major differences in the nature and functions of the stereotypes invoked. The book concludes with a provocative account of the rise and decline of the twentieth century's overtly racist regimes - the Jim Crow South, Nazi Germany, and apartheid South Africa - in the context of world historical developments. This illuminating work is the first to treat racism across such a sweep of history and geography. It is distinguished not only by its original comparison of modern racism's two most significant varieties - white supremacy and antisemitism - but also by its eminent readability.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691116525 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
x, 338 p., [14] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Matthew Frye Jacobson argues in this text about America's racial odyssey, that race resides not in nature but in the contingencies of politics and culture. In ever-changing racial categories we glimpse the competing theories of history and collective destiny by which power has been organized and contested in the USA. Looking at the field of "whiteness studies" and linking it to traditional historical inquiry, Jacobson shows that in the USA, nation of immigrants, "race" has been at the core of civic assimilation: ethnic minorities in becoming American were reracialized to become Caucasian. He provides a counter-history of how nationality groups such as the Irish or Greeks became Americans as racial groups like Celts or Mediterraneans became Caucasian. Jacobson tracks race as a conception and perception, emphasizing the importance of knowing not only how we label one another but also how we see one another, and how that racialized vision has largely been transformed in the 20th century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674063716 20160527
Green Library, Education Library (Cubberley)
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
220 p.
Challenges the traditional view of castas (members of the caste system created by Spanish overlords) as alienated and dominated by a desire to improve their status. This text argues that instead, social control by the Spanish rested on patron-client networks.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299140441 20160527
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01

11. War without mercy [1986]

Book
xii, 398 p.
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01
Book
xiv, 697 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-200C-01