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Book
xxi, 456 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Part 1. Pre-Columbian Mexico (200-1519) * 1. Copn and Teotihuacan: Shared Culture Across a Great Distance (200-900 ce) * Image 1.1 Temple of Quetzalcoatl, Teotihuacan, detail showing talud-tablero and the rain god * Image 1.2 Painted vessel from the Margarita tomb, Copn, in the Teotihuacan style * 2. The Popol Vuh (the Community Book): The Mythic Origins of the Quich Maya (1554-1558) * 3. Mayan Royalty and Writing (c. 667 ce) * Image 3.1 Mayan king Hanab-Pakals sarcophagus lid * 4. The Origin of the Nahuas and the Birth of the Fifth Sun (1596) * 5. A Treasury of Mexica Power and Gender (c. 1541-1542) * Image 5.1 Tribute list from Tochtepec * Image 5.2 Midwife and newborn babies * Image 5.3 Marriage ceremony * 6. Markets and Temples in the City of Tenochtitlan (1519) * 7. The Mixtec Map of San Pedro Teozacoalco (1580) * Image 7.1 The Mixtec map of San Pedro Teozacoalco * 8. The Urban Zoning of Maya Social Class in the Yucatn (1566) * 9. The Nomadic Seris of the Northern Desert (1645) Part 2. The Spanish Conquest and Christian Conversion (1519-1610) * 10. Hernn Corts and Moteucoma Meet, According to a Spanish Conqueror (1568) * 11. Moteucoma and Hernn Corts Meet, According to a Nahua Codex (c. 1555) * 12. The Nahua Interpreter Malintzin Translates for Corts and Moteucoma (1580) * Image 12.1 Malintzin translates for Corts and Moteucoma * 13. Acazitli of Tlalmanalco: Nahua Conqueror on the Mesoamerican Frontier (1541) * 14. Poetic Attempts to Justify the Conquest of Acoma, New Mexico (1610) * 15. The Tlaxcaltecas Stage a Christian Pageant Like Heaven on Earth (1538) * 16. The Spiritual Conquest: The Trial of Don Carlos Chichimecatecotl of Texcoco (1539) * 17. The Inquisition Seizes Don Carloss Estate: The Oztoticpac Map (1540) * Image 17.1 The Oztoticpac lands map of 1540 * 18. Father Fernndez Attempts to Convert the Seris of Sonora Single-handedly (1679) Part 3. The Consolidation of Colonial Government (1605-1692) * 19. The Silver Mining City of Zacatecas (1605) * 20. Chimalpahin: Indigenous Chronicler of His Time (1611-1613) * 21. The Creation of Religious Conformity (the Early Eighteenth Century) * 22. On Chocolate (1648) * 23. The Treatment of African Slaves (the Seventeenth Century) * 24. The Persistence of Indigenous Idolatry (1656) * 25. Afro-Mexicans, Mestizos, and Catholicism (1672) * 26. Sor Juana: Nun, Poet, and Advocate (1690) * 27. The 1692 Mexico City Revolt (1692) Part 4. Late Colonial Society (1737-1816) * 28. Indigenous Revolt in California (1737) * 29. Maroon Slaves Negotiate with the Colonial State (1767) * 30. Mexicos Paradoxical Enlightenment (1784) * 31. Casta Paintings (1785) * Image 31.1 Francisco Clapera, De Espaol, y India nace Mestiza (From Spaniard and Indian comes Mestiza) * Image 31.2 Francisco Clapera, De Espaol, y Negra, Mulato (From Spaniard and Black, Mulato) * 32. Hidalgos Uprising (1849) * 33. Jos Mara Moreloss National Vision (1813) * 34. A Satirical View of Colonial Society (1816) Part 5. The Early Republic (1824-1852) * 35. Address to the New Nation (1824) * 36. Caudillo Rule (1874) * 37. A Womans Life on the Northern Frontier (1877) * 38. Female Education (1842, 1851) * The Education of Women * Advice to Young Ladies * 39. Mexican Views of the Mexican-American War (1850) * 40. The Mayas Make Their Caste War Demands (1850) * 41. Mexico in Postwar Social Turmoil (1852) Part 6. Liberalism, Conservatism, and the Porfiriato (1856-1910) * 42. The Reconfiguration of Property Rights and the Church-State Relations (1856) * 43. The Offer of the Crown to Maximilian by the Junta of Conservative Nobles (1863) * 44. Porfirio Dazs Political Vision (1871) * 45. A Letter to Striking Workers (1892) * 46. A Positivist Interpretation of Feminism (1904) * 47. Precursors to Revolution (1904, 1906) * Valle Nacional, Regeneracin 1904 * Mexican Liberal Party Program * 48. The Cananea Strike: Workers Demands (1906) * 49. Land and Society (1909) * 50. Popular Images of Mexican Life (the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries) * Image 50.1 Jos Guadalupe Posada, Grand Electric Skeleton * Image 50.2 Jos Guadalupe Posada, The American Mosquito * Image 50.3 Jos Guadalupe Posada, The Mutiny of Students (street newspaper) * Image 50.4 Jos Guadalupe Posada, Cemetary of Ancient Epitaphs * Image 50.5 Jos Guadalupe Posada, Visit and Farewell to Seor de Ixtapalapa Who Is Venerated in Said Village * 51. Corridos from the Porfiriato (the Early 1900s) * The Corrido of the Rural Police (Porfirian Era) * The Corrido of the Electric Trains (Porfirian Era) Part 7. The Mexican Revolution (1911-1940) * 52. Francisco Maderos Challenge to Porfirio Daz (1910) * 53. Revolution in Morelos (1911) * 54. Land, Labor, and the Church in the Mexican Constitution (1917) * Article 27 * Article 123 * Article 130 * 55. Revolutionary Corridos (1917) * Fragment of The Corrido of the Constitutional Congress of Quertaro (1917) * The Death of Emiliano Zapata (1917) * 56. The Catholic Church Hierarchy Protests (1917, reprinted 1926) * 57. Petitioning the President (the 1920s) * Telegram (1922) * Telegram (1924) * Letter (1922) * Letter (1927) * 58. Plutarco Elas Calles: The Legal Challenges of the Postrevolutionary State (1928) * 59. Feminism, Suffrage, and Revolution (1931) * 60. Chronicles of Mexico City (1938) * In Defense of Whats Been Used * The Markets * 61. The Responsibility of Government and Private Enterprise to the Mexican People (1937-1938) * The Real Purposes of the Companies * Images of Oil Workers * Image 61.1 Drinking Fountains * Image 61.2 English Colony, Tacoteno, Minititlan, Veracruz * Image 61.3 Recreation Centers * Image 61.4 Workers Camp Poza Rica, Veracruz * Image 61.5 Restrooms, South Side * Crdenas Speaks Part 8. The Institutionalization of the Revolution (1940-1965) * 62. An Assessment of Mexico from the Right (1940) * 63. We the Undersigned (1941, 1945) * Letter (1941) * Letter (1945) * 64. Modernization and Society (1951) * 65. Official History (1951) * Image 65.1 Social Differences * Image 65.2 The Conquistador: Hernn Corts, standing on the bridge of his ship . . . * Image 65.3 Moctezuma II, Emperor of Mexico * Image 65.4 Political Consequences * Image 65.5 Ethnic Consequences * 66. Chicano Consciousness (1966) * 67. Rubn Jaramillo and the Struggle for Campesino Rights in Postrevolutionary Morelos (1967) Part 9. Neoliberalism and Its Discontents (1968-2006) * 68. Eyewitness and Newspaper Accounts of the Tlatelolco Massacre (1968) * Mara Alicia Martnez Medrano, Nursery-School Director * Gilberto Guevara Niebla of the CNH * Miguel ngel Martnez Agis, Reporter, Excelsior, Thursday, October 3, 1968 * Bloody Tlatelolco, Excelsior, Editorial Page, Thursday, October 3, 1968 * Insidious News from UPI: On This Date We Cancel the News Agencys Service, El Sol Morning Edition, Thursday, October 3, 1968 * Jos A. Perez Stuart, Opinion, El Universal, Saturday, October 5, 1968 * Image 68.1 Precaution-Its Gonzlez, the one who lives in Tlatelolco! (editorial cartoon on Tlatelolco) * General Lzaro Crdenas Condemns the Agitators: He Calls on the Sense of Responsibilities in Defense of National Unity, El Heraldo de Mxico, Sunday, October 6, 1968 * 69. Theft and Fraud (1970) * 70. Serial Satire: The Comic Book (1974) * Image 70.1 How to Fill Your Gut * 71. The 1985 Earthquake (1985, 1995) * Eight Hundred Factories and Sweatshops Totally Destroyed: The Earthquake Revealed the Exploitation of Women Textile Workers * Evangelina Corona Interview * 72. The EZLN Views Mexicos Past and Future (1992) * 73. Popular Responses to Neoliberalism (the Late 1990s) * 74. Jesusa Rodrguez: Iconoclast (1995) * 75. Maquila Workers Organize (2006) * 76. Lies Within the Truth Commission (2006).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813343341 20160604
Mexican History is a comprehensive and innovative primary source reader in Mexican history from the pre-Columbian past to the neoliberal present. Chronologically organized chapters facilitate the book's assimilation into most course syllabi. Its selection of documents thoughtfully conveys enduring themes of Mexican history-land and labor, indigenous people, religion, and state formation-while also incorporating recent advances in scholarly research on the frontier, urban life, popular culture, race and ethnicity, and gender. Student-friendly pedagogical features include contextual introductions to each chapter and each reading, lists of key terms and related sources, and guides to recommended readings and Web-based resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813343341 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
xii, 212 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • pt. 1. Introduction : Revolution, emancipation, and independence
  • The French Caribbean in the eighteenth century
  • The Revolution begins, 1789-1791
  • From slave revolution to emancipation, 1791-1794
  • Defining emancipation, 1794-1798
  • The Haitian revolution and the United States
  • War and independence
  • The legacy of the Haitian revolution
  • Major revolutionary figures and groups
  • pt. 2. The documents
  • 1. The French Caribbean in the eighteenth century
  • 1. The Code Noir, 1685
  • 2. Prophesies of Slave Revolution, 1771 and 1780
  • 3. Description... of the French Part of the Island of Saint-Domingue / Médéric-Louis-Élie Moreau de Saint-Méry, 1797
  • 2. The revolution begins, 1789-1791
  • 4. Letters from the Salve Revolt in Martinique, August-September 1789
  • 5. Address to the National Assembly, October 22, 1789 / The Free Citizens of Color, October 22, 1789
  • 6. Decree of March 8 and Instructions of March 28, 1790 / The National Assembly
  • 7. Letter to Those Who Love Mankind / Abbé Gréoire, October 1790
  • 8. Letters from the Uprising of Vincent Ogé, October 1790
  • 9. Observations on the Origin and Progression of the White Colonists' Prejudice against Men of Color / Julien Raimond, 1791
  • 10. The Debate of May 15, 1791
  • 11. Law on the Colonies / The National Assembly, 1791
  • 3. From slave revolution to emancipation, 1791-1794
  • 12. Voyage to the North of Haiti / Hérard Dumesle, 1824
  • 13. History of the Revolution of Saint-Domingue / Antoine Dalmas, 1814
  • 14. Letter to the Marquis de Gallifet / Pierre Mossut, September 18, 1791
  • 15. Reports from the Insurrection / Philadelphia General Advertiser, October-November 1791
  • 16. Letters to the Commissioners / Jean-François and Biassou, December 1791
  • 17. In the Camps of the Insurgents / Gros, 1791
  • 18. Preface to The Slavery of the Blacks / Olympe de Gouges, 1792
  • 19. From The Friend of the People / Jean-Paul Marat, 1792
  • 20. The True State of the Case, Respecting the Insurrection at St. Domingo / Thomas Clarkson, 1792
  • 21. Law of April 4 / The National Assembly, 1792
  • 22. Account of the Slave Revolt / Journal Républicain de la Guadeloupe, April 24, 1793
  • 23. Petition / Laurent Jolicoeur, 1793
  • 24. Decree of General LIberty / Léger Félicité Sonthonax, August 29, 1793
  • 25. Insurgent Responses to Emancipation, 1793
  • 26. The Abolition of Slavery / The National Convention, February 4, 1794
  • 4. Defining emancipation, 1794-1798
  • 27. Proclamations / Victor Hugues, 1794
  • 28. Geneviève Labothière Secures Her Brother's Freedom, 1796-1801
  • 29. The Plantation Policies of Étienne Polverel, 1794
  • 30. The True Colors of the Planters or the System of the Hotel Massiac, Exposed by Gouli / Jean-Baptiste Belley, 1795
  • 31. A Refutation of Some Assertions in a Speech Pronounced in the Corps Législatif... by Viénot Vaublanc / Toussaint Louverture, 1797
  • 32. Law on the Colonies / The Council of the Five Hundred, 1798
  • 5. The Haitian Revolution and the United States
  • 34. Letters / Thomas Jefferson, 1797-1802
  • 35. Petition / Refugees in Charleston, S.C., October 25, 1799
  • 36. St. Domingo / Charles Brockden Brown, December 1804
  • 6. War and independence
  • 37. From Constitution of the French Colony of Saint-Dominque / Toussaint Louverture, 1801
  • 38. Proclamation / Louis Delgrès, 1802
  • 39. On the Final Stand of Delgrès / General Jean-François-Xavier de Ménard, 1802
  • 40. Letters / Napoléon Bonaparte and General Charles-Victor-Emmanuel Leclerc, 1802-1803
  • 41. Secret History ; or the Horrors of St. Domingo / Mary Hassal, 1808
  • 42. Letter to the Marquis de Gallifet / Marie-Rose Masson, July 27, 1802
  • 43. Letter to Delpech/ Brigadier General Pierre Cangé, November 1802
  • 44. The Haitian Declaration of Independence, January 1, 1804
  • 45. The Haitian Constitution, 1805
  • Appendixes
  • A chronology of events related to the slave revolution in the Caribbean (1635-1805)
  • Questions for consideration
  • Selected bibliography
  • Index.
The Haitian Revolution was the first slave rebellion to have a successful outcome, leading to the establishment of Haiti as a free black republic and paving the way for the emancipation of slaves in the rest of the French Empire and the world. Incited by the French Revolution, the enslaved inhabitants of the French Caribbean began a series of revolts, and in 1791 plantation workers in Haiti, then known as Saint-Domingue, overwhelmed their planter owners and began to take control of the island. They achieved emancipation in 1794, and after successfully opposing Napoleonic forces eight years later, emerged as part of an independent nation in 1804. A broad selection of documents, all newly translated by the authors, is contextualized by a thorough introduction considering the very latest scholarship. Professors Dubois and Garrigus clarify for students the complex political, economic, and racial issues surrounding the revolution. Useful pedagogical tools include maps, illustrations, a chronology and a selected bibliography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781403971579 20160527
The Haitian Revolution was the first slave rebellion to have a successful outcome, leading to the establishment of Haiti as a free black republic and paving the way for the emancipation of slaves in the rest of the French Empire and the world. In this broad selection of documents, the authors clarify for students the complex political, economic, and racial issues surrounding the revolution and the wave of revolts elsewhere in the French Caribbean.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312415013 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01

3. We [2006]

Book
xxi, 203 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
xv, 198 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
vi, 346 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
It's the summer of 1998 and for five years over a hundred mangled and desecrated bodies have been found dumped on the Chihuahua desert outside of Juarez, Mexico, just across the river from El Paso, Texas. The perpetrators of the ever-rising number of violent deaths target poor young women, terrifying inhabitants of both sides of the border. El Paso native Ivon Villa has returned to her hometown to adopt the baby of Cecilia, a pregnant maquiladora worker in Juarez. When Cecilia turns up strangled and disemboweled in the desert, Ivon is thrown into the churning chaos of abuse and murder. Even as the rapes and killings of "girls from the south" continue--their tragic stories written in desert blood--a conspiracy covers up the crimes that implicate everyone from the Maquiladora Association to the Border Patrol. When Ivon's younger sister gets kidnapped in Juarez, Ivon knows that it's up to her to find her sister, whatever it takes. Despite the sharp warnings she gets from family, friends, and nervous officials, Ivon's investigation moves her deeper and deeper into the labyrinth of silence. From acclaimed poet and prose-writer Alicia Gaspar de Alba, Desert Blood is a gripping thriller that ponders the effects of patriarchy, gender identity, border culture, transnationalism and globalization on an international crisis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781558854468 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
xv, 160 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
xx, 531 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-193-01, HISTORY-1C-01
Book
87 p. ; 20 cm.
The Communist Manifesto is the most influential political call-to-arms ever written. In the century and a half since its publication the world has been shaken repeatedly by those who sought to make its declamations a reality. But the focus of this modern edition is not primarily the vivid history of Marx and Engels' most important work. Rather, with a characteristically elegant and acute introduction by the distinguished historian Eric Hobsbawm, it asserts the pertinence of the Manifesto today. Hobsbawm writes that 'the world described by Marx and Engels in 1848 in passages of dark, laconic eloquence, is recognizably the world we live in 150 years later'. He identifies the insights whish underpin the Manifesto's startling contemporary relevance: the recognition of capitalism as a world system capable of marshalling production on a global scale; its devastating impact on all aspects of human existe43nce, work, the family and the distribution of wealth; and the understanding that, far from being a stable, immutable system, it is, on the contrary, susceptible to enormous convulsions and crisis, and contains the seeds of its own destruction. For anyone sceptical of the triumphalism of the financial markets in recent years, who chooses to focus instead on the growing global divergence of rich and poor, the ravaging of the environment and the atomization of society, the manifesto will appear as a work of extraordinary prescience and power.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781859848982 20160528
Green Library, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
ix, 680 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
This reader reprints The Souls of Black Folk in its entirety along with all of the later work Darkwater. The collection includes a range of DuBois's writing over the course of his lifetime, showing the evolution of this thinking on major issues such as history, biography, segration and education, literature and art, and representative essays on the relation betweem black Americans and Africa.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195091786 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
741 p.
Most complete source book available on modern Jewish History. The second edition of The Jew in the Modern World is an expanded and highly diverse collection of primary materials that trace the Jewish experience in the modern period and illustrate the transformation of Jewish religion, culture, and identity from the 17th and 18th centuries to 1948. Retaining from the first edition those documents that have proven most useful to the student of Jewish history, this volume adds hitherto unpublished and inaccessible sources concerning the Jewishexperience in Easter Europe, women in Jewish history, American Jewish life, the Holocaust, and Zionism and the nascent Jewish community in Palestine on the eve of the establishment of the State of Israel.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195074529 20160528
This second edition is an expanded and highly diverse collection of primary materials that trace Jewish experience in the modern period and illustrate the transformation of Jewish religion and culture and identity beginning in the 17th and 18th centuries and ending in 1948. Careful selection of documents originally appearing in many different languages and thoughtful organization and extensive annotation of the documents make this volume an invaluable resource for the student and teacher of modern Jewish history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195074536 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
xii, 89 p. : port. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
344 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
180 p. ; 20 cm.
  • This way for the gas, ladies and gentlemen
  • A day at Harmenz
  • The people who walked on
  • Auschwitz, our home : a letter
  • The death of Schillinger
  • The man with the package
  • The supper
  • A true story
  • Silence
  • The January offensive
  • A visit
  • The world of stone.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01
Book
xv, 456 p. 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01

15. Collected stories [1960 - ]

Book
381 p. 20 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-1C-01