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Book
ix, 213 p. ; 23 cm.
While in his own time Gandhi was recognised by friends and enemies alike as a major political force, not only in India but the world at large, in our own day the Mahatma has been reduced to an idealist by his supporters as much as by his detractors. Whether this idealism is regarded as sincere or hypocritical, Gandhi has also become a resolutely Indian figure today, capable only of inspiring others in the most general way. Yet the Mahatma always considered his practices as being realistic and even mundane in the ease of their application, while at the same time holding them to possess universal potential. India for him was only the site of an experiment in non-violence. Given that Gandhi had become during his own lifetime one of the world's most famous and admired men, indeed one of the earliest figures who enjoyed such global celebrity, these grandiose impressions of his mission were not out of place. This book is about the Mahatma as a political thinker, one who recognised how the quotidian reality of modern life could be radicalised to produce the most extraordinary effects. In this sense he belongs with Lenin, Hitler and Mao as one of the great revolutionary figures of our times, though his politics was of course directed along paths other than state-building. Focussing on his unsentimental engagement with the hard facts of imperial domination, fascism and civil war, this study places Gandhi at the centre of modern history, exploring the new political reality he claimed to have discovered. This was a politics the Mahatma mobilised in practices that required as much sacrifice, and even death, as those propagated by his revolutionary peers, if for very different reasons. The Impossible Indian reveals Gandhi as the hard-hitting political thinker he was and confirms the contemporary relevance of his legacy to the world at large.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849041157 20160609
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
xvii, 273 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction Judith M. Brown-- Part I. Gandhi: The Historical Life: 1. Gandhi's world Yasmin Khan-- 2. Gandhi 1869-1915: the transnational emergence of a public figure Jonathan Hyslop-- 3. Gandhi as nationalist leader, 1915-1948 Judith M. Brown-- Part II. Gandhi: Thinker and Activist: 4. Gandhi's key writings Tridip Suhrud-- 5. Gandhi's religion and its relation to his politics Akeel Bilgrami-- 6. Conflict and nonviolence Ronald J. Terchek-- 7. Gandhi's moral economics Thomas Weber-- 8. Gandhi and the state Anthony Parel-- 9. Gandhi and social relations Tanika Sarkar-- Part III. The Contemporary Gandhi: 10. Portrayals of Gandhi Harish Trivedi-- 11. Gandhi in independent India Anthony Parel-- 12. Gandhi's global legacy David Hardiman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521133456 20160605
Even today, six decades after his assassination in January 1948, Mahatma Gandhi is still revered as the father of the Indian nation. His intellectual and moral legacy, and the example of his life and politics, serve as an inspiration to human rights and peace movements, political activists and students. This book, comprised of essays by renowned experts in the fields of Indian history and philosophy, traces Gandhi's extraordinary story. The first part of the book explores his transformation from a small-town lawyer during his early life in South Africa into a skilled political activist and leader of civil resistance in India. The second part is devoted to Gandhi's key writings and his thinking on a broad range of topics, including religion, conflict, politics and social relations. The final part reflects on Gandhi's image and on his legacy in India, the West, and beyond.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521133456 20160605
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
xv, 425 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • South Africa. Prologue: An unwelcome visitor
  • No-touchism
  • Among Zulus
  • Upper house
  • Leading the indentured
  • India. Waking India
  • Unapproachability
  • Hail, deliverer
  • Fast unto death
  • Village of service
  • Mass mayhem
  • Do or die.
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
xv, 380 p. : ports. ; 24 cm.
'My struggle is not merely political. It is religious and therefore quite pure.' This major new interpretation of the life of Gandhi adds a new dimension to our understanding of this extraordinary figure of twentieth-century history. Drawing on material neglected by earlier biographers, Kathryn Tidrick provides a highly original account of Gandhi's beliefs, their origins, and their expression in his political views and personal behaviour. She revealingly examines Gandhi's ideas about the relationship between sexual temptation and spiritual power, and the bizarre and scandalous behaviour that resulted. The fresh light that Tidrick throws on her subject reveals not the secular saint of popular myth but a difficult and self-obsessed man driven to pursue the world-changing destiny that he believed was marked out for him. Gandhi's conception of his personal destiny grew out of the religious influences to which he was exposed as a student in London and developed in the context of the Indian independence struggle. Throughout a long and turbulent career, he strove to balance the demands of the spiritual discipline he imposed on himself with the necessity (as he saw it) of his personal leadership of the independence movement and the claims of practical politics. Penetrating and provocative, "Gandhi: A Political and Spiritual Life" shows how he maintained an unswerving belief that his success or failure was of crucial significance not only for India but or the world. It makes a tremendous contribution to our understanding of the man behind the myth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845111663 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
x, 259 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
xvi, 208 p. ; 23 cm.
The idea for "Philosophy in a Time of Terror" was born hours after the terrorist attacks on 9/11 and came to realization just weeks later when Giovanna Borradori sat down with Jurgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida, in separate interviews, in New York City. Guided by Borradori, Habermas and Derrida evaluated the significance of the most destructive terrorist attack ever perpetrated. The resulting book is an unprecedented encounter between two of the most influential thinkers of our age: here for the first time Habermas and Derrida overcome their antagonism and agree to appear side by side in this book. In her introduction, Borradori contends that philosophy has an invaluable contribution to make to the understanding of terrorism. Just as the traumas produced by colonialism, totalitarianism and the Holocaust wrote the history of the 20th century, the history of the 21st century is already signed by global terrorism. Each dialogue, accompanied by a critical essay, recognizes the magnitude of this upcoming challenge. Characteristically, Habermas's dialogue is dense, compact and elegantly traditional. Derrida's, on the other hand, takes the reader on a long, winding and unpredictable road. Yet unexpected agreements emerge between them: both have a deep suspicion of the concept of "terrorism" and see the need for a transition from classical international law, premised on the model of nation-states, to a new cosmopolitan order based on continental alliances. As Derrida and Habermas disassemble and reassemble what we think we know about terrorism, they break from the familiar social and political rhetoric increasingly polarized between good and evil. In this process, we watch two of the great philosophical minds at work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226066646 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
xvii, 245 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Part 1 Colonialism in South Asia - a dominance without hegemony and its historiography: conditions for a critique of histiography, dominance and its histographies, containment of historiography in a dominant culture, where does historical criticism come from?, the universalizing tendency of capital and its limitations, the general configuration of power in Colonial India-- paradoxes of power, idioms of dominance and subordination, order and danda, improvement and dharma, obedience and bhakti, rightful dissent and Dharmic protest-- dominance without hegemony - the colonialist moment, over determinations, colonialsim as the failure of a universalist project, the fabrication of a spurious hegemony, the bad faith of historiography-- preamble to an autocritique. Part 2 Discipline and mobilize - hegemony and elite control in nationalist campaigns: mobilization and hegemony, anticipation of power by mobilization, a fight for prestige-- Swadeshi mobilization, poor Nikhilesh, caste sanctions, social boycott, liberal politics, traditional bans, Swadeshi by coercion or consent?-- mobilization or non-cooperation, social boycott in non-cooperation, Gandhi's opposition to social boycott, hegemonic claims contested-- Gandhian discipline, discpline versus persuasion, two disciplines - elite and subaltern-- crowd control and soul control. Part 3 An Indian historiography of India - hegemonic implications of a 19th-century agenda: calling on Indians to write their own history-- historiography and the formation of a colonial state, early colonial historiography, three types of narratives, education as an instrument of colonialism, the importance of English-- colonialism and the language of the colonized, indigenous languages harnessed to the Raj-- novels and histories-- begnnings of an indigenous rationalist historiography-- an ideaology of "Matribhaska"-- historiography and the question of power, an appropriated past, the theme of "Kalamka", "Bahubol" and its objects-- a failed agenda.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674214835 20160527
What is colonialism and what is a colonial state? Ranajit Guha points out that the colonial state in South Asia was fundamentally different from the metropolitan bourgeois state which sired it. The metropolitan state was hegemonic in character, and its claim to dominance was based on a power relation in which persuasion outweighed coercion. Conversely, the colonial state was non-hegemonic, and in its structure of dominance coercion was paramount. Indeed, the originality of the South Asian colonial state lay precisely in this difference: a historical paradox, it was an autocracy set up and sustained in the East by the foremost democracy of the Western world. It was not possible for that non-hegemonic state to assimilate the civil society of the colonized to itself. Thus the colonial state, as Guha defines it in this work, was a paradox, a dominance without hegemony. Dominance without hegemony had a nationalist aspect as well. This arose from a structural split between the elite and subaltern domains of politics, and the consequent failure of the Indian bourgeoisie to integrate vast areas of the life and consciousness of the people into an alternative hegemony. That predicament is discussed in terms of the nationalist project of anticipating power by mobilizing the masses and producing an alternative historiography. In both endeavours the elite claimed to speak for the people constituted as a nation and sought to challenge the pretensions of an alien regime to represent the colonized. A rivalry between an aspirant to power and its incumbent, this was in essence a contest for hegemony.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674214835 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
lxxvii, 208 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- Glossary-- A note on the history of the text-- Principal events in Gandhi's life-- Biographical synopses-- Bibliography-- Hind Swaraj-- Supplementary writings.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521574310 20160528
Hind Swaraj is Mahatma Gandhi's fundamental work. It is a key to understanding not only his life and thought but also the politics of South Asia in the first half of the twentieth century. For the first time this volume presents the 1910 text of Hind Swaraj and includes Gandhi's own Preface and Foreword (not found in other editions) and annotations by the editor. In his Introduction, Anthony Parel sets the work in its historical and political contexts. He analyses the significance of Gandhi's experiences in England and South Africa, and examines the intellectual cross-currents from East and West that affected the formation of the mind and character of one of the twentieth century's truly outstanding figures. The second part of the volume contains some of Gandhi's other writings, including his correspondence with Tolstoy, Nehru and others. Short bibliographical synopses of prominent figures mentioned in the text and a chronology of important events are also included as aids to the reader.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521574310 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
256 p.
Taking Gandhi's statements about civil disobedience to heart, in February 1922 residents from villages around the north Indian market town of Chauri Chaura attacked the local police station, murdering 23 police constables. Appalled that his teachings were turned to violent ends, Gandhi called off his Non-cooperation Movement and fasted to bring the people back to non-violence. In the meantime, the British government denied that the riot reflected Indian resistance to its rule and tried the rioters as common criminals. These events took on great symbolic importance among Indians and this book examines the way in which the event has been remembered, interpreted and used as a metaphor for the Indian struggle for independence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520087804 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
xii, 440 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01

11. On violence [1970]

Book
106 p. 21 cm.
Presents an analysis of the nature, causes, and significance of violence in the second half of the twentieth century. This title also re-examines the relationship between war, politics, violence, and power.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780156695008 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01
Book
316 p. ; 18 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-196-01