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Book
v. ; 25 cm.
  • v. 2. 1600-2000, abridged. pt. 1. 1600 to 1868. pt. 2. 1868 to 2000
For almost fifty years, Sources of Japanese Tradition has been the single most valuable collection of English-language readings on Japan. Unrivalled in its wide selection of source materials on history, society, politics, education, philosophy, and religion, the two-volume textbook is a crucial resource for students, scholars, and readers seeking an introduction to Japanese civilization. Originally published in a single hardcover book, Volume 2 is now available as an abridged, two-part paperback. Part 1 covers the Tokugawa period to 1868, including texts that address the spread of neo-Confucianism and Buddhism and the initial encounters of Japan and the West. Part 2 begins with the Meiji period and ends at the new millennium, shedding light on such major movements as the Enlightenment, constitutionalism, nationalism, socialism, and feminism, and the impact of the postwar occupation. Commentary by major scholars and comprehensive bibliographies and indexes are included.Together, these readings map out the development of modern Japanese civilization and illuminate the thought and teachings of its intellectual, political, and religious leaders.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231139199 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01
Book
xiv, 384 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
The Modern History of Japan covers Japanese history from approximately 1800--the last decades of rule by the military lords of the Tokugawa family--to the start of the twenty-first century. It begins when a crisis-ridden political and social order intersected with fast emerging Euro-American power. It then analyzes Japan's modern revolution of the late 19th century: the rise of a modern nation-state structure, the evolution of a capitalist industrial society, and the surprising move from semi-colony of the west to imperialist power. The second half of the book examines Japan's twentieth-century trajectory from global power through devastating war and defeat and occupation. It concludes by investigating the postwar history of contemporary Japan.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195110616 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01
Book
309 p., 1 map ; 24 cm.
  • Contains 2 works published separately in Japan: Andaguraundo, and, Yakusoku sareta basho de.
Monday, 20 March 1995. It is a clear spring morning. You get up at the normal time, wash, dress, breakfast, and head for the subway. You board the train, crowded as usual. Nothing out of the ordinary. It promises to be a run-of-the-mill day. You don't notice, but as he is about to leave the carriage a man drops a plastic bag to the floor and punctures it with the sharpened tip of his umbrella, releasing an invisible cloud of deadly nerve gas. On other trains at the same time four accomplices, all members of a doomsday cult, are doing the same...The Tokyo Gas Attack left twelve people dead and over thousands injured; many suffering from after-effects such as blindness, memory loss and paralysis as a consequence of inhaling sarin gas. Japan's leading novelist, Haruki Murakami, both horrified and fascinated by this apparently senseless act, has interviewed as many of the victims as were willing to talk to him in order to establish precisely what happened on the Tokyo subway that day. In Underground the survivors recount their thoughts and feelings at the time, marvel at the slow response of the emergency services, and reveal how the attack has changed their view of society. We are left with a sense not only of the nightmarish quality of the assault, but also of something amiss in Tokyo itself, perhaps in modern city life everywhere. In the second half of the book, Murakami interviews members of the Aum Shinrikyo (Supreme Truth) cult, in the hope that they might be able to explain how their guru, Shoko Asahara, instilled such devotion in his followers and why he resorted to terrorism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781860467578 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01
Book
676 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
A history of Japan, this work draws on a range of Japanese sources to offer an analysis of how shattering defeat in World War II, followed by over six years of military occupation by the USA, affected every level of Japanese society - in ways that neither the victor nor the vanquished could anticipate. Here is the history of an extraordinary moment in the history of Japanese culture, when new values warred with old, and when early ideals of "peace and democracy" were soon challenged by the "reverse course" decision to incorporate Japan into the Cold War Pax Americana. The work chronicles not only the material and psychological impact of utter defeat but also the early emergence of dynamic countercultures that gave primacy to the private as opposed to public spheres - in short, a liberation from totalitarian wartime control. John Dower shows how the tangled legacies of this intense, turbulent and unprecedented interplay of conqueror and conquered, West and East, wrought the utterly foreign and strangely familiar Japan of today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393046861 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01
Book
479 p.
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01
Book
xxi, 178 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01

7. Naomi [1985]

Book
ix, 237 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-195C-01