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Book
xv, 356 pages : maps, genealogical tables ; 24 cm
  • 1:The matrix of the Muslim world: the near East in the early seventh century 2: The Birth of the Islamic State 3: Conquest and division in the time of the Rashidun Caliphs 4: The Umayyad Caliphate 5: The early 'Abbasid Caliphate' 6: The Middle 'Abbasid caliphate 7: The structure of politics in the Muslim commonwealth 8: The Buyid confederation 9: The Kurds 10: The Hamdanids 11: Bedouin political movements and dynasties 12: Early Islamic Egypt and the Fatimid empire.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138787612 20160619
The Prophet and the Age of Caliphates is an accessible history of the Near East from c.600-1050AD, the period in which Islamic society was formed. Beginning with the life of Muhammad and the birth of Islam, Hugh Kennedy goes on to explore the great Arab conquests of the seventh century and the golden age of the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates when the world of Islam was politically and culturally far more developed than the West. The arrival of the Seljuk Turks and the period of political fragmentation which followed shattered this early unity, never to be recovered. This new edition is fully updated to take into account the considerable amount of new research on early Islam, and contains a completely revised bibliography. Based on extensive reading of the original Arabic sources, Kennedy breaks away from the Orientalist tradition of seeing early Islamic history as a series of ephemeral rulers and pointless battles by drawing attention to underlying long term social and economic processes. The Prophet and the Age of Caliphates deals with issues of continuing and increasing relevance in the twenty-first century, when it is, perhaps, more important than ever to understand the early development of the Islamic world. Students and scholars of early Islamic history will find this book a clear, informative and readable introduction to the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138787612 20160619
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01
Book
xviii, 280 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
The origins of Islam have been the subject of increasing controversy in recent years. The traditional view, which presents Islam as a self-consciously distinct religion tied to the life and revelations of the prophet Muhammad in western Arabia, has since the 1970s been challenged by historians engaged in critical study of the Muslim sources. In "Muhammad and the Believers", the eminent historian Fred Donner offers a lucid and original vision of how Islam first evolved. He argues that the origins of Islam lie in what we may call the 'Believers' movement' begun by the prophet Muhammad - a movement of religious reform emphasizing strict monotheism and righteous behavior in conformity with God's revealed law. The Believers' movement thus included righteous Christians and Jews in its early years, because like the Qur'anic Believers, Christians and Jews were monotheists and agreed to live righteously in obedience to their revealed law. The conviction that Muslims constituted a separate religious community, utterly distinct from Christians and Jews, emerged a century later, when the leaders of the Believers' movement decided that only those who saw the Qur'an as the final revelation of the One God and Muhammad as the final prophet, qualified as Believers. This separated them decisively from monotheists who adhered to the Gospels or Torah.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674050976 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01
Book
xi, 167 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
  • How to identify a cotton boom
  • Islam and cotton
  • The big chill
  • Of Turks and camels
  • A moment in world history.
A boom in the production and export of cotton made Iran the richest region of the Islamic caliphate in the ninth and tenth centuries. In the eleventh century, however, Iran's rich agricultural economy collapsed, along with its trade in textiles. Combining recent ecological data with a breakthrough analysis of primary sources, Richard W. Bulliet advances a provocative thesis to explain this puzzling historical moment. According to Bulliet, two significant events changed Iran in the eleventh century: its climate cooled significantly, which curbed the production of cotton, allowing Turkish nomads to establish a political dominance in the susceptible region that would last for centuries. Substantiating his argument with exhaustive archival and scientific research, Bulliet first establishes the factors that helped cultivate Iran's cotton industry, and then identifies the climatic trends, which he terms the "Big Chill, " that rendered the environment hostile to the crop. He concludes with the arrival of the Turks, a camel-driven migration that would change not only the makeup of the villages and cities of Iran but also the divisions of power and religion in the Islamic Middle East and the world for years to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231519878 20160527
A boom in the production and export of cotton made Iran the richest region of the Islamic caliphate in the ninth and tenth centuries. Yet in the eleventh century, Iran's impressive agricultural economy entered a steep decline, bringing the country's primacy to an end.Richard W. Bulliet advances several provocative theses to explain these hitherto unrecognized historical events. According to Bulliet, the boom in cotton production directly paralleled the spread of Islam, and Iran's agricultural decline stemmed from a significant cooling of the climate that lasted for over a century. The latter phenomenon also prompted Turkish nomadic tribes to enter Iran for the first time, establishing a political dominance that would last for centuries.Substantiating his argument with innovative quantitative research and recent scientific discoveries, Bulliet first establishes the relationship between Iran's cotton industry and Islam and then outlines the evidence for what he terms the "Big Chill." Turning to the story of the Turks, he focuses on the lucrative but temperature-sensitive industry of cross-breeding one-humped and two-humped camels. He concludes that this unusual concatenation of events had a profound and long-lasting impact not just on the history of Iran but on the development of world affairs in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231148368 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01
Book
125 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction 1. Crusades as Christian Holy Wars 2. Crusades as Christian Penitential Wars 3. Crusades and Imperialism 4. Crusading and Islam Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231146241 20160528
The Crusades were penitential war-pilgrimages fought in the Levant and the eastern Mediterranean, as well as in North Africa, Spain, Portugal, Poland, the Baltic region, Hungary, the Balkans, and Western Europe. Beginning in the eleventh century and ending as late as the eighteenth, these holy wars were waged against Muslims and other enemies of the Church, enlisting generations of laymen and laywomen to fight for the sake of Christendom.Crusading features prominently in today's religio-political hostilities, yet the perceptions of these wars held by Arab nationalists, pan-Islamists, and many in the West have been deeply distorted by the language and imagery of nineteenth-century European imperialism. With this book, Jonathan Riley-Smith returns to the actual story of the Crusades, explaining why and where they were fought and how deeply their narratives and symbolism became embedded in popular Catholic thought and devotional life. From this history, Riley-Smith traces the legacy of the Crusades into modern times, specifically within the attitudes of European imperialists and colonialists and within the beliefs of twentieth-century Muslims.Europeans fashioned an interpretation of the Crusades from the writings of Walter Scott and a French contemporary, Joseph-Francois Michaud. Scott portrayed Islamic societies as forward-thinking, while casting Christian crusaders as culturally backward and often morally corrupt. Michaud, in contrast, glorified crusading, and his followers used its imagery to illuminate imperial adventures. These depictions have had a profound influence on contemporary Western opinion, as well as on Muslim attitudes toward their past and present. Whether regarded as a valid expression of Christianity's divine enterprise or condemned as a weapon of empire, crusading has been a powerful rhetorical tool for centuries. In order to understand the preoccupations of Islamist jihadis and the character of Western discourse on the Middle East, Riley-Smith argues, we must understand how images of crusading were formed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231146241 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01
Book
xxv, 326 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, geneal. table ; 24 cm.
  • Revolution
  • Mansūr and his legacy
  • Hārūn al-Rashīd: the golden prime
  • The war between the brothers
  • Poetry and power at the early Abbasid Court
  • Landscape with palaces
  • The Harem
  • Ma'mūn to Mutawwakil
  • Abbasid Court culture
  • High noon in Sāmarrā.
A "remarkable narrative history" (The Times) of the dynasty that ruled from Baghdad during Islam's greatest era The "golden age of Islam" in the eighth and ninth centuries was as significant to world history as the Roman Empire was in the first and second centuries. Islamic culture and enterprise stretched from Tunisia to India; its legacy influenced politics and society for years to come. From the founding of the city of Baghdad in AD 762 to the end of the ninth century, the rule of the Abbasid dynasty was the zenith of Islamic conquest and influence. The caliphs of Baghdad formed the model for succeeding Muslim regimes, from military conquests to court-sponsored poetry and literature, from building palaces to establishing court bureaucracies. Yet the true story of this fascinating empire has rarely been told outside the academic world. In this deftly woven narrative, Hugh Kennedy introduces us to the rich history and flourishing culture of the period and to the men and women of the palaces at Baghdad and Samarra - the caliphs, viziers, eunuchs and women of the harem - who fashioned the glorious days of the Arabian Nights. It is an epic story in every sense, with larger-than-life rulers, exotic slave girls, inventive tortures and enough court intrigue to frighten a Borgia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780306814358 20160609
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01
Book
xv, 286 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. The Near East before Islam: 1. Introduction-- 2. The religions of late antiquity-- 3. Arabia before Islam-- 4. The early seventh century-- Part II. The Emergence of Islam, 600-750: 5. Approaches and problems-- 6. The origins of the Muslim community-- 7. Early Islam in the Near East-- 8. The Umayyad period-- 9. The beginnings of sectarianism-- 10. The non-Muslims of early Islam-- 11. The 'Abbasid revolution-- Part III. The Consolidation of Islam, 750-1000: 12. Issues of Islamic identity-- 13. Religion and politics-- 14. Shi'ism-- 15. The formation of Sunni traditionalism-- 16. Asceticism and mysticism-- 17. The non-Muslim communities-- Part IV. Medieval Islam, 1000-1500: 18. The medieval Islamic Near East-- 19. A Sunni 'revival'?-- 20. Common patterns in social and political organization-- 21. Modes of justice-- 22. The transmission of religious knowledge-- 23. Sufism-- 24. Popular religion-- Epilogue: 25. From medieval to modern Islam.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521582148 20160528
Jonathan Berkey's book surveys the religious history of the peoples of the Near East from roughly 600 to 1800 CE. The opening chapter examines the religious scene in the Near East in late antiquity, and the religious traditions which preceded Islam. Subsequent chapters investigate Islam's first century and the beginnings of its own traditions, the 'classical' period from the accession of the Abbasids to the rise of the Buyid amirs, and thereafter the emergence of new forms of Islam in the middle period. Throughout, close attention is paid to the experiences of Jews and Christians, as well as Muslims. The book stresses that Islam did not appear all at once, but emerged slowly, as part of a prolonged process whereby it was differentiated from other religious traditions and, indeed, that much that we take as characteristic of Islam is in fact the product of the medieval period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521582148 20160528
www.myilibrary.com MyiLibrary
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01

7. The Koran [1997]

Book
vii, 455 p. ; 20 cm.
Universally accepted by Muslims to be the infallible word of God as revealed to Mohammed by the Angel Gabriel nearly fourteen hundred years ago, the Koran still provides the rules of conduct fundamental to the Arab way of life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140445589 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01
Book
236 p.
Bulliet abandons the historian's habit of viewing Islamic history "from the center, " that is, focusing on the rise and fall of imperial dynasties. Instead, he derives an understanding of how and why Islam became -- and continues to be -- so rooted in the social structure of the vast majority of people who lived far from the political locus and did not see the caliphate as essential in their lives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231082198 20160528
This concise revisionist account of the historical evolution of Islamic society goes beyond the caliph and the capital. The author abandons the historian's habit of viewing Islamic history "from the centre", that is, focusing on the rise and fall of imperial dynasties. Instead, he derives a more accurate understanding of how and why Islam became - and continues to be - so rooted in the social structure of the vast majority of people who lived far from the political centre and did not see the caliphate as essential in their lives. Focusing his research on Iran, and especially the cities of Isfahan, Gorgan and Nishapur, Bulliet considers: conversion; migration and demographic trends; education and its role in defining cultural norms; and the changing functions and fortunes of cities and urban life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231082181 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01

9. The Islâmic world [1973]

Book
xvii, 468 p. : maps ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-182C-01