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Book
xxii, 279 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Contents and Abstracts1Citizenship and Participation chapter abstractChapter One introduces the general argument developed in subsequent chapters. In Hmong American communities, political participation arises and deepens through inter-generational social mechanisms of voting. The process is aided by local institutions that educate newcomers in participatory skills and aid reconstruction of identity narratives. Present-day notions about citizenship rights and a desire for political inclusion are influenced by the Vietnam War experience of the Hmong Americans and their status as stateless refugees after the war. The relatively low levels of social-economic attainment of the Hmong Americans compared to other Asian Americans helps explain the motivation to participate in politics to press for public policy that would address poverty and educational reform 2Reconstructing Identity Narratives chapter abstractChapter Two examines the cultural and political meaning of identity stories as articulated by Hmong Americans, including examples of how freedom and parity are expressed in these narratives. These stories have formed through an amalgam of lived experience and values. The process of construction and telling of the narratives is participatory. The engagement of ordinary people in conversations and creation of interpretive stories and performing art productions is what animates the identity narratives in civic and political life. 3Participation in Local Contexts chapter abstractChapter Three compares local contexts of political and civic participation in several cities - principally, Fresno, California-- Saint Paul-Minneapolis, Minnesota-- Eau Claire, Wisconsin-- and Hickory, North Carolina. The analysis uses a conceptual framework delineating the nature of parity of participation in society, including the realm of economic distribution and cultural recognition, as articulated by Fraser. The analysis emphasizes the importance of public educational institutions and community based organizations in promoting citizen education. . Interviews of high school students illustrate the importance of cultural recognition in the process of citizen education. 4Views on Politics: From Leadership and the Grassroots chapter abstractChapter Four uses interviews of Hmong American leaders and grassroots community members to examine views on a wide range of questions: the nature and extent of participants' political and civic engagement-- sources of political information-- attitudes about leadership-- relationships to political parties-- views about the main problems in the community-- concepts of ethnic identity-- and views of national policy issues. 5Human Rights Advocacy Across Borders chapter abstractChapter Five presents a case study of the politics of recognition and dignity as expressed in the testimony of Hmong refugees about human rights violations in Thailand, where their relatives' graves were desecrated. A collaborative project led by human rights researchers at the University of Minnesota and Hmong American political leaders explored how the rights claims can be usefully framed in terms of indigenous religious rights. From the work of a newly emerging generation of college-educated Hmong Americans, parts of this story began to find moving expression in a nascent literary and performing arts. 6 Deepening Intergenerational Participation chapter abstractChapter Six concludes with a discussion of future prospects for wider and deeper political participation of the Hmong Americans. The desire to engage in elections is rooted in a belief in the role of government in assisting people poverty to become self-sufficient. Experiencing racial prejudice and economic disadvantage opens opportunities for education about commonality of interest with other racial-ethnic minorities and socially marginalized people. From this ground there is potential to better appreciate the power of collective action in politics and to gain the skills needed in a truly participatory citizenship which extends beyond voting alone. To realize this potential requires imagining collaborative and inter-generational projects of community-based political education.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804782234 20170717
Hmong American immigrants first came to the United States as refugees of the Vietnam War. Forty years on, they have made a notable impact in American political life. They have voter participation rates higher than most other Asian American ethnic groups, and they have won seats in local and state legislative bodies. Yet the average level of education among Hmong Americans still lags behind that of the general U.S. population and high rates of poverty persist in their community, highlighting a curious disparity across the typical benchmarks of immigrant incorporation. Carolyn Wong analyzes how the Hmong came to pursue politics as a key path to advancement and inclusion in the United States. Drawing on interviews with community leaders, refugees, and the second-generation children of immigrants, Wong shows that intergenerational mechanisms of social voting underlie the political participation of Hmong Americans. Younger Hmong Americans engage older community residents in grassroots elections and conversation about public affairs. And in turn, within families and communities, elders often transmit stories that draw connections between ancient Hmong aspirations for freedom and contemporary American egalitarian projects.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804782234 20170717
Green Library
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
xiii, 270 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
The political ferment of the 1960s produced not only the Civil Rights Movement but others in its wake: women's liberation, gay rights, Chicano power, and the Asian American Movement. Here is a definitive history of the social and cultural movement that knit a hugely disparate and isolated set of communities into a political identity - and along the way created a racial group out of marginalized people who had been uncomfortably lumped together as Orientals. The Asian American Movement was an unabashedly radical social movement, sprung from campuses and city ghettoes and allied with Third World freedom struggles and the anti-Vietnam War movement, seen as a racist intervention in Asia. It also introduced to mainstream America a generation of now internationally famous artists, writers, and musicians, like novelist Maxine Hong Kingston. Karen Ishizuka's definitive history is based on years of research and more than 120 extensive interviews with movement leaders and participants. It's written in a vivid narrative style and illustrated with many striking images from guerrilla movement publications. Serve the People is a book that fills out the full story of the Long Sixties.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781781688625 20160619
Green Library
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Video
1 videodisc (29 min.) : sound, color color and black and white ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Dolby Digital. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; all regions. DVD video.
A young Chinese American journalist seeks her ethnic origins by traveling through the West Coast Chinese community interviewing people on the coolie labor immigrations, work in railroads and mines, and contributions made by Chinese to American culture.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01

4. The sympathizer [2015]

Book
371 pages ; 24 cm
The winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, as well as five other awards, The Sympathizer is the breakthrough novel of the year. With the pace and suspense of a thriller and prose that has been compared to Graham Greene and Saul Bellow, The Sympathizer is a sweeping epic of love and betrayal. The narrator, a communist double agent, is a man of two minds, a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who arranges to come to America after the Fall of Saigon, and while building a new life with other Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles is secretly reporting back to his communist superiors in Vietnam. The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity and America, a gripping espionage novel, and a powerful story of love and friendship.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802123459 20161018
Green Library
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
234 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Flowers amidst the ashes
  • What color is your heart??
  • We must go on
  • For the community
  • English, I don't know!
  • Bi bi girl
  • I am your illusion, your reality, your future
  • Grits and sushi
  • I cut across borders as if they have no meaning
  • Victims no more
  • American girl in Asia
  • Found in translation.
"I listen and gather people's stories. Then I write them down in a way that I hope will communicate something to others, so that seeing these stories will give readers something of value. I tell myself that this isn't going to be done unless I do it, just because of who I am. It's a way of making my mark, leaving something behind ...not that I'm planning on going anywhere right now." So explains Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu in this touching, introspective, and insightful examination of mixed race Asian American experiences. The son of an Irish American father and Japanese mother, Murphy-Shigematsu uses his personal journey of identity exploration and discovery of his diverse roots to illuminate the journeys of others. Throughout the book, his reflections are interspersed among portraits of persons of biracial and mixed ethnicity and accounts of their efforts to answer a seemingly simple question: Who am I? Here we meet Norma, raised in postwar Japan, the daughter of a Japanese woman and an American serviceman, who struggled to make sense of her ethnic heritage and national belonging. Wei Ming, born in Australia and raised in the San Francisco of the 1970s and 1980s, grapples as well with issues of identity, in her case both ethnic and sexual. We also encounter Rudy, a "Mexipino"; Marshall, a "Jewish, adopted Korean"; Mitzi, a "Blackinawan"; and other extraordinary people who find how connecting to all parts of themselves also connects them to others. With its attention on people who have been regarded as "half" this or "half" that throughout their lives, these stories make vivid the process of becoming whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804775182 20160608
Green Library
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
xviii, 654 p. ; 27 cm.
"Asian American Studies Now" truly represents the enormous changes occurring in Asian American communities and the world, changes that require a reconsideration of how the interdisciplinary field of Asian American studies is defined and taught. This comprehensive anthology, arranged in four parts and featuring a stellar group of contributors, summarizes and defines the current shape of this rapidly changing field, addressing topics such as transnationalism, U.S. imperialism, multiracial identity, racism, immigration, citizenship, social justice, and pedagogy. Jean Yu-wen Shen Wu and Thomas C. Chen have selected essays for the significance of their contribution to the field and their clarity, brevity, and accessibility to readers with little to no prior knowledge of Asian American studies. Featuring both reprints of seminal articles and groundbreaking texts, as well as bold new scholarship, "Asian American Studies Now" addresses the new circumstances, new communities, and new concerns that are reconstituting Asian America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813545752 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
xxiii, 547 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
"Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970" is the first comprehensive study of the lives and artistic production of artists of Asian Ancestry active in the United States before 1970. The publication features original essays by ten leading scholars, biographies of more than 150 artists, and over 400 reproductions of artwork, ephemera, and images of the artists.Aside from a few artists such as Dong Kingman, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Isamu Noguchi, and Yun Gee, artists of Asian ancestry have received inadequate historical attention, even though many of them received wide critical acclaim during their productive years. This pioneering work recovers the extraordinarily impressive artistic production of numerous Asian Americans, and offers richly informed interpretations of a long-neglected art history. To unravel the complexity of Asian American art expression and its vital place in American art, the texts consider aesthetics, the social structures of art production and criticism, and national and international historical contexts.Without a doubt, "Asian American Art" will profoundly influence our understanding of the history of art in America and the Asian American experience for years to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804757515 20160528
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Video
1 videodisc (58 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
After the Manongs labored to build America, their San Francisco Manilatown community is wiped out by urban renewal, and 50 old-timers are forcibly evicted from the International Hotel by 300 cops in the dead of night. Documents destruction of the last block of Manilatown on Kearny Street. Includes updates about recent activity and ownership of the site.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Video
1 videodisc (83 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Documentary on racism in working-class America focuses on the murder of Vincent Chin, a Chinese-American, in a Detroit bar. Interweaves the murder with social concerns and questions about justice.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
xiv, 425 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Figures and tables-- Preface-- Introduction Gordon H. Chang-- Part I. Framing the Discussion: 1. Asian Americans and politics: some perspectives from history Gordon H. Chang-- 2. The racial triangulation of Asian Americans Claire Jean Kim-- 3. Citizenship nullification: the impossibility of Asian American politics Neil T. Gotanda-- 4. Beyond electoral politics: renewing a search for a paradigm of Asian Pacific American politics Don T. Nakanishi-- Part II. Voting Behaviour: 5. Asian Americans as the median voters: an exploration of attitudes and voting patterns on ballot initiatives Wendy K. Tam Cho and Bruce E. Cain-- 6. changing of the guard? the emerging immigrant majority in Asian American politics Paul M. Ong and David E. Lee-- 7. Voting participation: race, gender, and the comparative status of Asian American women Pei-Te Lien-- Part III. Emerging Political Identities: 8. US-born, immigrant, refugee, or indigenous status: public policy implications for Asian Pacific American families Kenyon S. Chan-- 9. Asian Pacific American youth: pathways for political participation Peter Nien-Chu Kiang-- 10. Seen, rich, but unheard? the politics of Asian Indians in the United States Sanjeev Khagrm, Mansh Desai and Jason Varughese-- 11. The impact of mainstream political mobilization on Asian American communities: the case of Korean Americans in Los Angeles, 1992-1998 Edward J. W. Park-- Part IV. Toward the Future: 12. People from China crossing the river: Asian American political empowerment and foreign influence Frank H. Wu and Francey Lim Youngberg-- 13. Lessons learned from the 'Locke for Governor' campaign-- 14. Building on the indigenous base: the fund-raising controversy and the future of Asian American political participation Paul Y. Watanabe-- 15. Asian Americans and multiracial political coalitions: New York City's Chinatown and redistricting, 1990-1991 Leland T. Saito-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804742016 20160528
Asian Americans have quite recently emerged as an increasingly important force in American politics. In 1996, more than 300 Asian and Pacific Americans were elected to federal, state, and local offices; today, more than 2,000 hold appointive positions in government. Asian American voices have been prominent in policy debates over such matters as education, race relations, and immigration reform. On a more discordant note, a national controversy with racial overtones erupted in 1996-97 over alleged illegal Asian and Asian American campaign contributions and illicit foreign influences on American politics, and in 1999 another controversy arose over allegations that a Chinese American physicist had passed nuclear secrets to the Chinese government. Yet little scholarly attention has been devoted to understanding the engagement of Asian Americans with American politics. This volume of fifteen essays is the first to take a broad-ranging look at the phenomenon. Its contributors are drawn from a variety of disciplines history, political science, sociology, and urban studies and from the practical political realm. They discuss such topics as the historical relationship of Asians to American politics, the position of Asian Americans in America s legal and racial landscape, recent Asian American voting behavior and political opinion, politics and the evolving demographics of the Asian American population, current national controversies involving Asian Americans, conclusions drawn from regional and local case studies, and the future of Asian Americans in American politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804742016 20160528
Green Library
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
xxvii, 322 p. : ill., ports. ; 29 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Book
x, 356 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Video
1 videodisc (42 min.) : sound, color with black and white sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
Explores the embittering effect the Rodney King verdict and riot had on Korean American women shopkeepers who suffered more than half of the material losses in the conflict. Film underscores the shattering of the American dream while taking the media to task for playing up the "Korean-Black" aspect of the rioting.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01
Video
1 videocassette (39 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in. + instructional materials ([27] leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.)
Explores the effect the Rodney King verdict and riot had on Korean American women shopkeepers who suffered more than half of the material losses in the conflict. The interviews also provide perspectives on racism, ethnic relations, and mainstream media coverage in the U.S.
Media & Microtext Center
AMSTUD-155D-01, ASNAMST-155D-01, ASNAMST-55D-01, HISTORY-155D-01, HISTORY-55D-01