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Book
1 online resource (281 p.) : digital, PDF file(s).
  • Philosophical introduction to the Meditations-- Textual and linguistic introduction-- Descartes, Meditationes/Meditations Latin text with English translation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521191388 20160611
Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy, published in Latin in 1641, is one of the most widely studied philosophical texts of all time, and inaugurates many of the key themes that have remained central to philosophy ever since. In his original Latin text Descartes expresses himself with great lucidity and elegance, and there is enormous interest, even for those who are not fluent in Latin, in seeing how the famous concepts and arguments of his great masterpiece unfold in the original language. John Cottingham's acclaimed English translation of the work is presented here in a facing-page edition alongside the original Latin text. Students of classical philosophy have long had the benefit of dual-language editions, and the availability of such a resource for the canonical works of the early-modern period is long overdue. This volume now makes available, in an invaluable dual-language format, one of the most seminal texts of Western philosophy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521191388 20160611
eReserve
HISTORY-140A-01
Book
xxxvii, 586 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
  • The First day
  • The Second day
  • The Third day
  • The Fourth day.
Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, published in Florence in 1632, was the most proximate cause of his being brought to trial before the Inquisition. Using the dialogue form, a genre common in classical philosophical works, Galileo masterfully demonstrates the truth of the Copernicancan system over the Ptolemaic one, proving, for the first time, that the earth revolves around the Sun. It's influence is incalculable. The Dialogue is not only one of the most important scientific treatises ever written, but a work of supreme clarity and accessibility, remaining as readable now as when it was first published. This edition uses the definitive text established by the University of California Press, in Stillman Drake's translation, and includes a Foreword by Albert Einstein and a new Introduction by J.L. Heilbron.
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01

3. The new organon [2000]

Book
xxxv, 252 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Plan of the work-- The second part of the work: the New Organon or true directions for the interpretation of nature-- Summary of the second part of the work, digested into aphorisms: Book I, Book II.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521563994 20160528
When the New Organon appeared in 1620, part of a six-part programme of scientific inquiry entitled 'The Great Renewal of Learning', Francis Bacon was at the high point of his political career, and his ambitious work was groundbreaking in its attempt to give formal philosophical shape to a new and rapidly emerging experimentally-based science. Bacon combines theoretical scientific epistemology with examples from applied science, examining phenomena as various as magnetism, gravity, and the ebb and flow of the tides, and anticipating later experimental work by Robert Boyle and others. His work challenges the entire edifice of the philosophy and learning of his time, and has left its mark on all subsequent philosophical discussions of scientific method. This volume presents a new translation of the text into modern English by Michael Silverthorne, and an introduction by Lisa Jardine that sets the work in the context of Bacon's scientific and philosophical activities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521563994 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01
Book
ix, 245 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
The brilliant German mathematician Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), one of the founders of modern astronomy, revolutionised the Copernican heliocentric theory of the universe with his three laws of motion: that the planets move not in circular but elliptical orbits, that their speed is greatest when nearest the sun, and that the sun and planets form an integrated system. This volume contains two of his most important works: "The Epitome of Copernican Astronomy" (books 4 and 5 of which are translated here) is a textbook of Copernican science, remarkable for the prominence given to physical astronomy and for the extension to the Jovian system of the laws recently discovered to regulate the motions of the Planets; and "Harmonies of the World" (book 5 of which is translated here) expounds an elaborate system of celestial harmonies depending on the varying velocities of the planets.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01
Book
91 p. ; 22 cm.
William Harvey (1578-1657) was a rebel in medical science: Contrary to contemporary practice, he began his epoch-making investigation into the action of the heart and the blood's circulation by minutely observing their action in live animals and by a lengthy series of dissections, rather than by mere reliance on the anatomical lessons of ancient medicine and philosophy. "On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals", including explanations of heart valves and arterial pulse, stands as a triumph of true scientific inquiry, and is still regarded as one of the greatest discoveries in physiology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780879758547 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01
Book
xlix, 82 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction by Nina Rattner Gelbart Translator's Preface Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds Preface Dedication The First Evening The Second Evening The Third Evening The Fourth Evening The Fifth Evening Notes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520071711 20160528
Surveying the night sky, a charming philosopher and his hostess, the Marquise, are considering the possibility of travelers from the moon. 'What if they were skillful enough to navigate on the outer surface of our air, and from there, through their curiosity to see us, they angled for us like fish? Would that please you?' asks the philosopher. 'Why not?' the Marquise replies. 'As for me, I'd put myself into their nets of my own volition just to have the pleasure of seeing those who caught me'. In this imaginary conversation of three hundred years ago, readers can share the excitement of a new, extremely daring view of the universe. "Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds" ("Entretiens sur la pluralite des mondes"), first published in 1686, is one of the best loved classics of the early French enlightenment. Through a series of informal dialogues that take place on successive evenings in the marquise's moonlit gardens, Fontenelle describes the new cosmology of the Copernican world view with matchless clarity, imagination, and wit. Moreover, he boldly makes his interlocutor a woman, inviting female participation in the almost exclusively male province of scientific discourse. The popular Fontenelle lived through an entire century, from 1657 to 1757, and wrote prolifically. H. A. Hargreaves' fresh, appealing translation brings the author's masterpiece to new generations of readers, while the introduction by Nina Rattner Gelbart clearly demonstrates the importance of the "Conversations" for the history of science, of women, of literature, and of French civilization, and for the popularization of culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520071711 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01
Book
xii, 127 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
A study of the work and ideas of Galileo.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226279039 20160528
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
HISTORY-140A-01

8. On the revolutions [1978]

Book
xvii, 450 p. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01
Book
x, [35], 273 p. ([35], 270 p., facsim. illus.) 22 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-140A-01