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Book
xi, 474 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations ix Introduction 1 1. A Troubled Beginning 7 2. Walking the City 41 3. Political Worlds 81 4. A Turbulent Economy and an Anxious Society 129 5. Building a New Germany 169 6. Sound and Image 207 7. Culture and Mass Society 251 8. Bodies and Sex 297 9. Revolution and Counterrevolution from the Right 331 10. The Weimar Legacy: A Global Perspective 361 Conclusion 401 Notes 409 Bibliographic Essay 447 Acknowledgments 453 Index 455.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691157962 20160612
Weimar Germany still fascinates us, and now this complex and remarkably creative period and place has the history it deserves. Eric Weitz's Weimar Germany reveals the Weimar era as a time of strikingly progressive achievements--and even greater promise. With a rich thematic narrative and detailed portraits of some of Weimar's greatest figures, this comprehensive history recaptures the excitement and drama as it unfolded, viewing Weimar in its own right--and not as a mere prelude to the Nazi era. Weimar Germany tells how Germans rose from the defeat of World War I and the turbulence of revolution to forge democratic institutions and make Berlin a world capital of avant-garde art. Setting the stage for this story, Weitz takes the reader on a walking tour of Berlin to see and feel what life was like there in the 1920s, when modernity and the modern city--with its bright lights, cinemas, "new women, " cabarets, and sleek department stores--were new. We learn how Germans enjoyed better working conditions and new social benefits and listened to the utopian prophets of everything from radical socialism to communal housing to nudism. Weimar Germany also explores the period's revolutionary cultural creativity, from the new architecture of Erich Mendelsohn, Bruno Taut, and Walter Gropius to Hannah Hoch's photomontages and Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's theater. Other chapters assess the period's turbulent politics and economy, and the recipes for fulfilling sex lives propounded by new "sexologists." Yet Weimar Germany also shows that beneath this glossy veneer lay political turmoil that ultimately led to the demise of the republic and the rise of the radical Right. Thoroughly up-to-date, skillfully written, and strikingly illustrated, Weimar Germany brings to life as never before an era of creativity unmatched in the twentieth century-one whose influence and inspiration we still feel today. In a new chapter, Weitz depicts Weimar's global impact in the decades after the destruction of the republic, when so many of its key cultural and political figures fled Nazi Germany. The Weimar style they carried with them has powerfully influenced art, urban design, and intellectual life from Tokyo to Ankara, Brasilia to New York. They made Weimar an example of all that is liberating, and all that can go wrong, in a democracy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691157962 20160612
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Book
xviii, 463 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Master narratives and rival interpretations of modern German history-- Part I. German Central Europe Before Modern Nationalism: 2. The pyramid of power in pre-modern Germany-- 3. Baroque and Enlightenment Germany, 1648-1789-- 4. Power states (Machtstaaten): the rise of the Prussian and Austrian military-bureaucratic monarchies-- 5. Aufklarung: the German Enlightenment and other spirits of the age-- Part II. German Identities Between Liberalism, Nationalism, and Socialism, 1789-1914: 6. Revolution on the march: French challenge, German response, 1789-1815-- 7. 'Land of poets and thinkers': the transition from Enlightenment universalism to German national culture-- 8. Freedom and voice, 'blood and iron': the struggle over liberalism and nationalism, 1815-1914-- 9. Power to the people: German social democracy in the age of industrialization-- 10. Women, family, feminism, 1789-1914-- 11. Habsburg Austria: a multinational path in German history-- 12. Jews, Germans, German Jews, 1789-1914-- Part III. Nation in Crisis: Defeat, Turmoil, Aggression, 1914-5: 13. The Prussian-German monarchy's sudden death: World War I and postwar revolution, 1914-20-- 14. Democracy's bitter fruits: society and politics, 1918-33-- 15. The rise of Hitlerism: middle-class discontent and populist utopia-- 16. The 'people's community' at Hitler's command: national and socialist Germany, 1933-45-- 17. Lebensraum: the war for empire in Eastern Europe-- 18. Banned from nation and earth: German Jews after 1914, Nazi 'Jewish policy', and the Holocaust-- Part IV. The Cold War Germanies and Their Post-1989 Fusion: A Nation Reforged from Its Remnants?: 19. Return from the abyss: defeated Germany and the West German Federal Republic, 1949-89-- 20. 'Real existing socialism': Soviet-occupied Germany and the German Democratic Republic, 1949-90-- 21. Present-day Germany: the post-unification scene in West and East.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521191906 20160614
This history of German-speaking central Europe offers a very wide perspective, emphasizing a succession of many-layered communal identities. It highlights the interplay of individual, society, culture and political power, contrasting German with Western patterns. Rather than treating 'the Germans' as a collective whole whose national history amounts to a cumulative biography, the book presents the pre-modern era of the Holy Roman Empire; the nineteenth century; the 1914-5 era of war, dictatorship and genocide; and the Cold War and post-Cold War eras since 1945 as successive worlds of German life, thought and mentality. This book's 'Germany' is polycentric and multicultural, including the multinational Austrian Habsburg Empire and the German Jews. Its approach to National Socialism offers a conceptually new understanding of the Holocaust. The book's numerous illustrations reveal German self-presentations and styles of life, which often contrast with Western ideas of Germany.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521191906 20160614
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Book
xv, 205 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
  • PART I: INTRODUCTION: UNDERSTANDING NAZI GERMANY PART II: THE DOCUMENTS THE WEIMAR REPUBLIC AND THE RISE OF THE NAZI PARTY Adolf Hitler, On His Hopes for Germany in 1914 from Mein Kampf, 1925 Magnus Hirschfeld, Sexual Catastrophes, 1926 Elsa Herrmann, This is the New Woman, 1929 Adolf Hitler, Anti-Semitic Speech, April 22, 1922 Adolf Hitler, On the Use of Mass Meetings from Mein Kampf, 1925 Elsbeth Zander, Tasks Facing the German Woman, January 23, 1926 Adolf Hitler, Adolph Hitler's Manifesto, September 10, 1930 Albert Speer, On Joining the Nazi Movement in 1931, 1969 Melita Maschmann, A German Teenager's Response to the Nazi Takeover in January 1933, 1963 New York Times, Germany Ventures, January 31, 1933 Poster Critiquing Hitler, 1932 LIFE IN NAZI GERMANY Reports on the Sources of Working-class Support for the Nazis and the Limits to Opposition, 1935-39 Joseph Goebbels, 'The Tasks of the Ministry for Propaganda, ' March 15, 1933 William Shirer, Description of the Nazi Party Rally in Nuremberg, September 4-5, 1934 Concordat between the Holy See and the German Reich, July 2 , 1933 Protestant Church Leaders, Declaration of Independence from the Nazi State, October 21, 1934 Adolf Hitler, Opening Address at the House of German Art in Munich, July 19, 1937 'Degenerate Music' Brochure, 1939 New York Times, Report on a Visit to a Reich Prison Camp, July 26, 1933 Gabriele Herz, Description of an Early Concentration Camp for Women, 1937 Reports on Working-class Attitudes Toward the Murder of SA leader Ernest Rohm Adolf Hitler, Speech to the National Socialist Women's Organization, September 8, 1934 'Healthy Parents, Healthy Children!' Poster, 1934 Jutta Rudiger, On the League of German Girls, 1939 Peter Gay, A Jewish Teenager Remembers the 1936 Berlin Olympics, 1998 Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring, July 14, 1933 SS Security Service, Report Assessing Public Response to the Film I Accuse, January 15, 1942 Heinrich Himmler, On the Question of Homosexuality, February 18, 1937 Heinrich Himmler, Fight against the Gypsy Nuisance, December 8, 1938 Otto D. Tolischus and Frederick T. Birchall, Reports Introduction of Anti-Semitic Laws Marta Appel, Jewish Life after the Nazi Seizure of Power in 1933, 1940 -41 Inge Deutschkron, Growing up Jewish in 1930s Germany, 1978 David Buffum, Report on Kristallnacht, November 1938 GERMANY GOES TO WAR Adolf Hitler, Speech before the Reichstag, September 1, 1939 Reich Commissioner for the Strengthening of the National Character of the German People, On the Re-Germanization of Lost German Blood, December 1940 Melita Maschmann, A German Colonizer of Poland in 1939 or 1940 , 1963 Karl Fuchs, A German Soldier's Letters from France, 1940 Field Marshal Walter von Reichenau, Conduct of Troops in Eastern Territories, October 10, 1941 Karl Fuchs, A German Soldier's Letters from the Eastern Front, 1941 'Total War' Cover Illustration, 1943 Kathe Ricken, Life Under the Bombs, 1943 THE PERSECUTION OF THE JEWS AND THE 'FINAL SOLUTION' Victor Klemperer, Reflections on the Meanings of the Yellow Star for Jews in Germany in 1941, 1947 Jewish Cultural Association of Wurttemberg, On Deportation, November 17, 1941 Ria Broring, A German Woman's Account of Jewish Deportations, April 23, 1942 Description of a Mass Execution of Jews in Ukraine in 1942,1945 Heinrich Himmler, Speech to SS Officers in Posen, October 4, 1943 Chaim Kaplan, In the Warsaw Ghetto, 1939-42 Hirsh Glick, Jewish Partisan Song, 1943 Ruth Kluger, A Young Girl's 'Lucky Accident' at Auschwitz in 1944, 1992 Hanna Levy-Hass, The Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp, 1944-45 THE LIMITS TO RESISTANCE National Socialist Reich Youth Leadership, Report on 'Swing' Dancing as a Form of Resistance, 1942 Jokes about the Nazi Regime, 1940 -43 The White Rose, Resistance to the Nazi State, 1942 Fabian von Schlabrendorff, Account of the Military Conspiracy to Assassinate Hitler, 1944 Soviet Slave Workers in Germany, Anti-Nazi Leaflet, November 27, 1944 THE LAST DAYS OF THE NAZI REGIME Melita Maschmann, The Mobilization of Youth in the Winter 1945, 1963 Anna Schwartz, Account of the Entry of Soviet Army Troops into Danzig on March 27, 1945, 1952 Gene Currivan, Report on a Visit to a Nazi Concentration Camp Liberated by the U.S. Army, April 18, 1945 Adolf Hitler, My Political Testament, April 29, 1945.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312454685 20160604
"The Nazi State and German Society "invites students to view the history of the twentieth century's most infamous totalitarian regime through the voices of people who experienced it. Robert Moeller's comprehensive introduction presents an overview of the Nazi regime, from Weimar to the end of the war, explaining the factors that led millions of ordinary Germans to sacrifice individual rights in the interest of collective goals and national security. The effects of Nazi rule on Aryans, Jews, and other "undesirables" are explored, along with a discussion of why so few people organized against the regime. Over 50 documents from a broad range of perspectives -- including speeches, memoirs, letters, diaries, and propaganda posters -- bring this history to life and illustrate the effect of Nazi rule on German society. Document headnotes, a chronology, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography provide pedagogical support.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312454685 20160604
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Video
1 videodisc (2 hr., 12 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
A group of young World War I German recruits pass from idealism to disillusionment with war.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Video
1 videodisc (137 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
A 1984 East Berlin simple surveillance assignment: Capt. Gerd Wiesler, a Stasi officer and a specialist in surveillance, has been assigned to keep an eye on Georg Dreyman, a respected playwright, and his actress girlfriend, Christa-Maria Sieland. Though Dreyman is known to associate with blacklisted director Albert Jerska, a known dissident, Dreyman's record is spotless. Wiesler discovers that Minister Hempf has an ulterior motive in spying on this seemingly upright citizen. Wiesler's sympathies shift from the government to its people - or at least to this one particular person.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Book
261 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Book
270 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
In 1900, in a small country town in the eastern reaches of the German Empire, a German boy is found frozen beneath the ice. He has been brutally murdered, the blood drained from his dismembered body. The crime resembles traditional blood libel accusations against the Jews. When a Jewish butcher is accused of committing the murder, the town explodes in an anti-Semitic fervour. Using vast amounts of previously undiscovered material, Helmut Walser Smith, a professor of German history, has pieced together the web of false stories and accusations, the abundance of rumour and malice that engulfed this Prussian town. Reminiscent of a true historical thriller in its dramatic intensity, The Butcher's Tale presciently anticipates the Nazi pogroms that would descend on Germany three decades later.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393050981 20160527
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Video
1 videodisc (132 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
A group of young World War I German recruits pass from idealism to disillusionment with war.
Media & Microtext Center
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Book
xxii, 271 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
This study is an account of how a unit of average middle-aged Germans became the cold-blooded murderers of tens of thousands of Jews. Browning tells about such Germans, and helps the reader to understand, not only what they did to make the Holocaust happen, but also how they were transformed psychologically, from the ordinary men of the title into active participants in the most monstrous crime in human history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780060995065 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01
Book
139 p. ; 22 cm.
The Berlin Wall is represented in this novel as more personal than politically symbolic. Real people cross the Wall not to defect but to quarrel with their lovers, see movies, and sometimes just because they can't help themselves. The Wall has divided their emotions as well as their country.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226739410 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-138A-01, JEWISHST-138A-01