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8 results

1. Simplicissimus [1999]

Book
433 pages, 1 map ; 20 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01

2. The free sea [2004]

Book
xxv, 145 p. : port., map ; 23 cm.
The freedom of the seas -- meaning both the oceans of the world and coastal waters -- has been among the most contentious issues in international law for the past four hundred years. The most influential argument in favour of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing was that put forth by the Dutch theorist Hugo Grotius in his 1609 'Mare Liberum'. "The Free Sea" was originally published in order to buttress Dutch claims of access to the lucrative markets of the East Indies. It had been composed as the twelfth chapter of a larger work, "De Jure Praedae" ('On the Law of Prize and Booty'), which Grotius had written to defend the Dutch East India Company's capture in 1603 of a rich Portuguese merchant ship in the Straits of Singapore. This new edition publishes the only translation of Grotius's masterpiece undertaken in his own lifetime -- a work left in manuscript by the English historian and promoter of overseas exploration Richard Hakluyt (1552-1616). This volume also contains William Welwod's critque of Grotius (reprinted for the first time since the seventeenth century) and Grotius's reply to Welwod. Taken together, these documents provide an indispensable introduction to modern ideas of sovereignty and property as they emerged from the early-modern tradition of natural law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780865974319 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01

3. The Figaro trilogy [2003]

Book
xxxvi, 306 p. ; 20 cm.
  • The barber of Seville
  • The marriage of Figaro
  • The guilty mother.
The Barber of Seville * The Marriage of Figaro * The Guilty Mother Eighteenth-century France produced only one truly international theatre star, Beaumarchais, and only one name, Figaro, to put with Don Quixote or D'Artagnan in the ranks of popular myth. But who was Figaro? Not the impertinent valet of the operas of Mozart or Rossini, but both the spirit of resistance to oppression and a bourgeois individualist like his creator. The three plays in which he plots and schemes chronicle the slide of the ancien regime into revolution but also chart the growth of Beaumarchais' humanitarianism. They are also exuberant theatrical entertainments, masterpieces of skill, invention, and social satire which helped shape the direction of French theatre for a hundred years. This lively new translation catches all the zest and energy of the most famous valet in French literature.Beaumarchais[title should link to the catalogue entry][insert cover image 2804138].
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01
Book
2 v. ; 23 cm.
First published in 1776, the year in which the American Revolution officially began, Smith's "Wealth of Nations" sparked a revolution of its own. In it Smith analyzes the major elements of political economy, from market pricing and the division of labour to monetary, tax, trade and other government policies that affect economic behaviour. Throughout he offers seminal arguments for free trade, free markets and limited government. Criticizing mercantilists who sought to use the state to increase their nations' supply of precious metals, Smith points out that a nation's wealth should be measured by the well-being of its people. Prosperity in turn requires voluntary exchange of goods in a peaceful, well-ordered market. How to establish and maintain such markets? For Smith the answer lay in man's social instincts, which government may encourage by upholding social standards of decency, honesty and virtue, but which government undermines when it unduly interferes with the intrinsically private functions of production and exchange. Social and economic order arise from the natural desires to better one's (and one's family's) lot and to gain the praise and avoid the censure of one's neighbours and business associates. Individuals behave decently and honestly because it gives them a clear conscience as well as the good reputation necessary for public approbation and sustained, profitable business relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780865970076 20160528
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01
Book
xxvii, 177 p. ; 24 cm.
"A wonderful book... Ginzburg is a historian with an insatiable curiosity, who pursues even the faintest of clues with all the zest of a born detective until every fragment of evidence can be fitted into place." -- New York Review of Books.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801823367 20160527
A survey of popular culture in 16th century Italy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801843877 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01
Book
xxiv, 124 p. ; 24 cm.
The central principles of what today is broadly known as political liberalism were made current in large part by Locke's "Second Treatise of Government" (1690). The principles of individual liberty, the rule of law, government by consent of the people, and the right to private property are taken for granted as fundamental to the human condition now. Most liberal theorists writing today look back to Locke as the source of their ideas. Some maintain that religious fundamentalism, 'post-modernism', and socialism are today the only remaining ideological threats to liberalism. To the extent that this is true, these ideologies are ultimately attacks on the ideas that Locke, arguably more than any other, helped to make the universal vocabulary of political discourse.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780915144938 20160528
Green Library
ECON-23N-01, HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01

7. Three treatises [1970]

Book
316 p. 20 cm.
Green Library
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01
Book
412 p. : maps ; 18 cm.
  • The expedition of Francisco Hernandex de Cordoba-- the expedition of Juan de Grijalva-- the expedition of Hernando Cortes - preparations-- the voyage-- Dona Marina's story-- a pause on the coast-- the stay at Cempoala-- the foundation of Vera Cruz-- the march to Cingapacinga and return of Cempoala-- events at Vera Cruz - the destruction of the ships-- the Tlascalan campaign-- peace with Tlascala - embassies from Mexico-- the march to Mexico-- the entrance into Mexico-- the stay in Mexico-- Montezuma's captivity-- Cortes in difficulties-- the flight from Mexico-- Cortes collects fresh strength-- expeditions around the lake-- the siege and capture of Mexico.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140441239 20160528
Vivid, powerful and absorbing, this is a first-person account of one of the most startling military episodes in history: the overthrow of Montezuma's doomed Aztec Empire by the ruthless Hernan Cortes and his band of adventurers. Bernal Diaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing in Mexico in 1520 and their amazement at the city, the exploitation of the natives for gold and other treasures, the expulsion and flight of the Spaniards, their regrouping and eventual capture of the Aztec capital.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780140441239 20160528
Green Library
HISTORY-10B-01, HISTORY-110B-01