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Book
xiv, 298 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Africans in colonial Cuba
  • Rural slave networks and insurgent geographies
  • The 1843 rebellions in Matanzas
  • To raise a rebellion in Matanzas: the urban connection, 1841-1843
  • And the women also knew: the gendered terrain of insurgency
  • The anatomy of a rural movement
  • African Cuban sacred traditions and the making of an insurgency.
Envisioning La Escalera--an underground rebel movement largely composed of Africans living on farms and plantations in rural western Cuba--in the larger context of the long emancipation struggle in Cuba, Aisha Finch demonstrates how organized slave resistance became critical to the unraveling not only of slavery but also of colonial systems of power during the nineteenth century. While the discovery of La Escalera unleashed a reign of terror by the Spanish colonial powers in which hundreds of enslaved people were tortured, tried, and executed, Finch revises historiographical conceptions of the movement as a fiction conveniently invented by the Spanish government in order to target anticolonial activities. Connecting the political agitation stirred up by free people of color in the urban centers to the slave rebellions that rocked the countryside, Finch shows how the rural plantation was connected to a much larger conspiratorial world outside the agrarian sector. While acknowledging the role of foreign abolitionists and white creoles in the broader history of emancipation, Finch teases apart the organization, leadership, and effectiveness of the black insurgents in midcentury dissident mobilizations that emerged across western Cuba, presenting compelling evidence that black women played a particularly critical role.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469622347 20160618
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
xii, 208 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
xiii, 279 p. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. The gender of violence-- 2. 'Beyond the limits of decency': women in slavery-- 3. Making 'better girls': Southern women and the claims of domesticity-- 4. 'Nothing but deception in them': the war within-- 5. Out of the house of bondage: a sundering of ties, 1865-1866-- 6. 'A makeshift kind of life': free women and free homes-- 7. 'Wild notions of right and wrong': from home to the streets.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521879019 20160528
The plantation household was, first and foremost, a site of production. This fundamental fact has generally been overshadowed by popular and scholarly images of the plantation household as the source of slavery's redeeming qualities, where 'gentle' mistresses ministered to 'loyal' slaves. This book recounts a very different story. The very notion of a private sphere, as divorced from the immoral excesses of chattel slavery as from the amoral logic of market laws, functioned to conceal from public scrutiny the day-to-day struggles between enslaved women and their mistresses, subsumed within a logic of patriarchy. One of emancipation's unsung consequences was precisely the exposure to public view of the unbridgeable social distance between the women on whose labor the plantation household relied and the women who employed them. This is a story of race and gender, nation and citizenship, freedom and bondage in the nineteenth century South; a big abstract story that is composed of equally big personal stories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521879019 20160528
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
x, 340 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Death, power, and Atlantic slavery
  • Worlds of wealth and death
  • Last rites and first principles
  • Expectations of the dead
  • Icons, shamans, and martyrs
  • The soul of the British Empire
  • Holy ghosts and eternal salvation
  • Gardens of remembrance.
What did people make of death in the world of Atlantic slavery? In "The Reaper's Garden", Vincent Brown asks this question about Jamaica, the staggeringly profitable hub of the British Empire in America - and a human catastrophe. Popularly known as the grave of the Europeans, it was just as deadly for Africans and their descendants. Yet among the survivors, the dead remained both a vital presence and a social force.In this compelling and evocative story of a world in flux, Brown shows that death was as generative as it was destructive. From the 18th-century zenith of British colonial slavery to its demise in the 1830s, the Grim Reaper cultivated essential aspects of social life in Jamaica - belonging and status, dreams for the future, and commemorations of the past. Surveying a haunted landscape, Brown unfolds the letters of anxious colonists; listens in on wakes, eulogies, and solemn incantations; peers into crypts and coffins, and finds the very spirit of human struggle in slavery. Masters and enslaved, fortune seekers and spiritual healers, rebels and rulers, all summoned the dead to further their desires and ambitions. In this turbulent transatlantic world, Brown argues, "mortuary politics" played a consequential role in determining the course of history.Insightful and powerfully affecting, "The Reaper's Garden" promises to enrich our understanding of the ways that death shaped political life in the world of Atlantic slavery and beyond.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674024229 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
xi, 270 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Prologue: The Path of Strangers
  • 1 Afrotopia
  • 2 Markets and Martyrs
  • 3 The Family Romance
  • 4 Come, Go Back, Child
  • 5 The Tribe of the Middle Passage
  • 6 So Many Dungeons
  • 7 The Dead Book
  • 8 Lose Your Mother
  • 9 The Dark Days
  • 10 The Famished Road
  • 11 Blood Cowries
  • 12 Fugitive Dreams.
In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman traces the history of the Atlantic slave trade by recounting a journey she took along a slave route in Ghana. Following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast, Hartman reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy and vividly dramatizes the effects of slavery on three centuries of African and African-American history. The slave, Hartman observes, is a stranger, one torn from family, home, and country. To lose your mother is to be severed from your kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as an outsider, an alien. There are no known survivors of Hartman's lineage, no relatives in Ghana whom she came hoping to find. She is a stranger in search of strangers, and this fact leads her into intimate engagements with the people she encounters along the way and draws her deeper into the heartland of slavery. She passes through the holding cells of military forts and castles, the ruins of towns and villages devastated by the trade, and the fortified settlements built to repel predatory armies and kidnappers. In artful passages of historical portraiture, she shows us an Akan prince who granted the Portuguese permission to build the first permanent trading fort in West Africa, a girl murdered aboard a slave ship, and a community of fugitives seeking a haven from slave raiders. --Jacket flap.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
xi, 296 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
Slave Country tells the tragic story of the expansion of slavery in the new United States. In the wake of the American Revolution, slavery gradually disappeared from the northern states and the importation of captive Africans was prohibited. Yet, at the same time, the country's slave population grew, new plantation crops appeared, and several new slave states joined the Union. Adam Rothman explores how slavery flourished in a new nation dedicated to the principle of equality among free men, and reveals the enormous consequences of U.S. expansion into the region that became the Deep South. Rothman maps the combination of transatlantic capitalism and American nationalism that provoked a massive forced migration of slaves into Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi. He tells the fascinating story of collaboration and conflict among the diverse European, African, and indigenous peoples who inhabited the Deep South during the Jeffersonian era, and who turned the region into the most dynamic slave system of the Atlantic world. Paying close attention to dramatic episodes of resistance, rebellion, and war, Rothman exposes the terrible violence that haunted the Jeffersonian vision of republican expansion across the American continent. Slave Country combines political, economic, military, and social history in an elegant narrative that illuminates the perilous relation between freedom and slavery in the early United States. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in an honest look at America's troubled past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674016743 20160528
ebrary Single-user access
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
viii, 142 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01
Book
xii, 78 p. 21 cm.
Green Library
AFRICAAM-107D-01, HISTORY-107D-01, HISTORY-7D-01